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Full Time MA Degrees in United Kingdom

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IN BRIEF. Ranked as ‘excellent’ by the Centre for Higher Education Development. Delivered by experienced staff. A pertinent and engaging subject with real-world relevance. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Ranked as ‘excellent’ by the Centre for Higher Education Development
  • Delivered by experienced staff
  • A pertinent and engaging subject with real-world relevance
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Intelligence and security issues are at the top of the political agenda following the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 and the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan.

And the increased availability of intelligence material means that it is possible to place these issues within their historical context.

This course is the longest-running non-governmental postgraduate course in the UK in the area of contemporary intelligence and security issues.

This programme can also be studied by part-time Distance Learning. MA Intelligence and Security Studies (Distance Learning) is currently only open to serving professionals in the armed forces, policing organisations and other related bodies. For more information please contact the Programme Leader, Dr. Dan Lomas ().

TEACHING

The course is taught through a combination of:

  • lectures, supported by worksheets, videos, and directed reading
  • seminars, which involve activities such as group discussions, case studies and presentations
  • guest lectures
  • conferences
  • Personal supervision

ASSESSMENT

Module performance is usually assessed by two essays of 3,500 words (50% each). In addition, MA students are required to submit a 14,000 word dissertation.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates follow a range of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, the media, think tanks and research institutions. Some pursue further study at doctoral level.

CAREER PROSPECTS

You will develop a wide range of skills on the course (writing, communication, presentation and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, international or non-governmental organisations, think-tanks and research institutions. You can also pursue further study at doctoral level.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

You are encouraged to attend the European Security, Terrorism and Intelligence (ESTI) seminar series. Convened by Dr Christopher J. Murphy, ESTI aims to bring together scholars with a research interest in European security, terrorism and intelligence and to transcend such artificial disciplinary boundaries in order to examine security, terrorism and intelligence issues together, in both their historical and contemporary dimensions.

Recent speakers have included Professor Keith Jeffery, author of MI6: The History of the Secret Intelligence Service, and Mr Michael Herman, author of Intelligence Power in Peace and War.

FURTHER STUDY

The University has its own research group for security issues called the Centre for European Security (CES). The group builds on the active research programme provided by the European Security, Terrorism and Intelligence (ESTI) network at the University of Salford. If your doctoral research is in security and intelligence issues you can become an associate member of this group. For more information see our website at http://www.espach.salford.ac.uk/page/es_research_centre



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This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. Read more

This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. You’ll directly address the complex nature of the politics and international relations of the Middle East to gain an oversight of internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations.

Covering a range of approaches from Politics, Comparative Politics and International Relations, it addresses the security, economic, identity and political dynamics of the region. The programme will be of interest to you if you’re wishing to study these issues in more depth and to make comparisons across the region.

You’ll benefit from our specific expertise and research interests in a diverse range of areas relating to the Middle East - with particular focus on security issues, regional relations and the interest of the outside powers in the Middle East, as well as our in-depth research and experience in specific sub-regional areas.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. They boast specialisms in a range of areas: the politics of Islamism; the Persian Gulf; the Israel-Palestine conflict; the international organisations of the Middle East; democratisation in the region and issues of terrorism and insurgency. Teaching on the programme draws upon a network of Middle East specialists based at the University. They come from a range of disciplines and participate in the Middle East Research Group (MERG).

Our rich research culture within the School of Politics and International Studies is specifically focused on the Middle East. It also draws on other regions and cross-cutting themes such as the prevalence of authoritarianism and the problems of democratisation, meaning that there is a combination of focus on the Middle East which is also influenced by wider insights and research focus.

Course content

The compulsory modules will give you the opportunity to:

  • gain an advanced understanding of the issues of security, economy and society across the Middle East
  • undertake a comprehensive analysis of the ever-changing dynamics of this complex region
  • examine the pressing contemporary issues facing the Middle East
  • gain an insight into the internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations
  • study in-depth the ongoing peace negotiations in Israel-Palestine.

You’ll also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

Each semester you will take 60 credits amounting to 120 credits across the whole year. In semester one you will study Contemporary Politics of the Middle East and in semester two you will study The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict, along with your chosen optional modules.

If you’re a part-time student, you’ll take one compulsory module and study some optional modules in your first year. You’ll then take the second compulsory module, the dissertation module and other optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Debating the Middle East: Islam, Politics and Culture 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Nuclear Non-Proliferation and WMD 15 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • Hezbollah: From Islamic Resistance to Government 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Theoretical Approaches in International Relations 30 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Relations and Politics of the Middle East MA Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You’ll also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment consists of a mixture of essays, exams and group presentations. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

The programme is both academically cutting-edge and policy relevant at a time when the Middle East is undergoing radical change. It will produce graduates who are able to fill the growing need for experts on the region in a variety of industries from oil and investment to security and services. The Middle East is a growing market for many firms who all want to understand the risks and opportunities of working in the region better.

There is a growing market from employers for graduates with expertise in Middle Eastern politics, including NGOs and international institutions; ministries of foreign affairs, trade and defence; as well as consultancy and risk-management/analysis firms engaged in the region.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research. Read more

This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research.

Whether you’re already a teacher or you plan to become one, this degree offers you a deeper understanding of how language is structured, used and interpreted and how this can inform language teaching. Core modules will introduce you to key topics in linguistics such as syntax, phonetics and phonology, as well as teaching methodologies and how they are applied. You’ll also improve your knowledge of research methods in language sciences.

To enhance your knowledge, you’ll choose from optional modules to suit your career plans or interests, on topics such as language acquisition or sociolinguistics. With support from expert tutors within the Language at Leeds research network, you’ll gain valuable skills and a sound knowledge base to prepare you for further research or to inform your teaching practice.

Specialist resources

Leeds is a fantastic place to study linguistics and phonetics. Our tutors and research students are active members of the wider Language at Leeds network which brings together researchers from across the University. You’ll be able to enhance your learning with an array of research events throughout the year.

Postgraduates also have access to our extensive facilities, including the Human Communications Suite complete with a recording studio and lab space for psycholinguistics experiments. You can make use of our phonetics lab and the Language Zone, a state-of-the-art space where you can use a range of language-based teaching materials whenever you want.

This is an academic programme which approaches English language teaching from the perspective of linguistics, and it is therefore not intended for those who are seeking vocational teacher training or classroom experience.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules in your first semester will give you a good grounding in key topics and approaches in linguistics, introducing you to syntax, phonetics, phonology and language acquisition. You’ll also develop the skills you need to study linguistics effectively.

In the following semester you’ll build on this foundation, improving your linguistic research skills while learning about language teaching methodologies and practices. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on topics that interest you, such as pragmatics and language development.

Throughout this programme you’ll develop sophisticated research and analytical skills, as well as a wealth of subject knowledge and teaching techniques. You’ll demonstrate this in your dissertation, where you’ll independently research a topic of your choice and submit the finished product by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Linguistics and Phonetics) 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Methodology in Language Teaching 15 credits
  • Language Teaching in Practice 15 credits
  • Academic Skills in Linguistics 15 credits
  • Research Methods in Linguistics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use diverse teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from our tutors’ expertise. They include seminars, lectures, online learning, tutorials and practicals. Independent study is also a vital element of the course. You’re also encouraged to sit in on classes in modules that you’re not taking, which gives you a great opportunity to gain a broad base of knowledge in linguistics and phonetics.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, assessment methods will vary. However, they usually include coursework , essays and practicals, while core linguistics modules also include exams.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a deeper understanding of human communication and how language is taught and learned. It will also give you high-level research and analysis skills that are valued in all kinds of industries and organisations.

Graduates have pursued a wide range of careers in fields such as language teaching, preparing language teaching materials, lexicography, editing work, the media, marketing and journalism. Many others have pursued PhD level study in fields such as applied linguistics and education.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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IN BRIEF. Study in a dynamic interdisciplinary research and teaching environment. Draw upon the resources and expertise of cultural and literary institutions in the region. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study in a dynamic interdisciplinary research and teaching environment
  • Draw upon the resources and expertise of cultural and literary institutions in the region
  • Share your work with peers and academic staff at our Annual MA Conference
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course is your chance to refine your critical skills through analysis of the literature and language of the modern period. During your time with us, you’ll learn in a lively research environment and benefit from the University’s links with local cultural organisations, including the International Anthony Burgess Foundation.

Your studies will focus on key aspects of literary modernity and explore the interaction between literature and theory. The interdisciplinary nature of the course encourages and stimulates debate on cultural, political and historical issues, as well as analysing the relationships between literature and other cultural forms.

COURSE DETAILS

MA Literature, Culture and Modernity helps you to acquire specific skills in a number of areas including critical thinking, research methods, cultural and literary theory, analysing literary and cultural texts in the context of debates on modernity.

You will develop your analytical and conceptual thinking skills and gain the expertise to focus on a specific research topic that interests you. During this course you will carry out advanced research and produce original and innovative studies.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The syllabus consists of four taught modules, followed by a dissertation. You will select three option modules from a range which varies from year to year. Modules focus on nineteenth, twentieth and twenty first century literature and culture, exploring literature in relation to popular and working-class culture, analysing the interaction between literature, cinema and theory, and examining issues of identity, gender and power. You will also follow the core module Literary Research Practice which helps prepare for the dissertation and for further study.

TEACHING

Teaching for most modules takes place in weekly, two-hour seminars. Personal supervision is provided throughout the course and in support of the writing of the dissertation.  The module Literary Research Practice is taught in three longer block sessions, with additional one-to-one supervisory sessions with a member of staff.

ASSESSMENT

You will be assessed through:

  • Written and oral assignments (66%)
  • Written dissertation(34%)

EMPLOYABILITY

Many graduates of this course have used it as part of their career development in areas as diverse as teaching, librarianship, media, publishing and the arts. Others use it as a means of access to PhD study or further research. You will develop a wide range of skills on this course (writing, communication, presentation and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers.

CAREER PROSPECTS

This course will suit you if you want to either progress in a career you already have experience in, re-skill for a different career path or continue the studies you took as an undergraduate.

Graduates from this course have progressed onto a number of careers within the arts, museums, libraries, education and others have progressed to PhD study. Graduates have gone on to work for companies including Hello Magazine, the University of Salford, local museums, secondary schools and further education, and to obtain competitive scholarships for PhD study.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The English Subject Directorate has links with the BBC at MediaCityUK. We also have links with local publishers and cultural organisations, including:

  • Working Class Movement Library
  • Imperial War Museum North
  • Manchester Jewish Museum
  • John Rylands Library
  • Chetham's Library
  • International Anthony Burgess Foundation.

Guest speakers from publishers and from other universities across the UK and from abroad regularly visit the Centre for English Literature and Language, as well as making contributions to the module Literary Research Practice. As an MA student on our course you would be encouraged to attend as many of these guest lecturers as possible. Colleagues in English frequently organise international conferences and specialist workshops to which MA students are also warmly invited.

FURTHER STUDY

Research in the English Subject Directorate is coordinated by Dr Scott Thurston, Director of the Research Centre for English Literature and Language. There are over 15 research-active academic staff in English and a number of early career researchers engaged in a range of research projects. We welcome PhD applications from MA students. You can find more information and contact details here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/arts-media/research/centre-for-english-literature-and-language.



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The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

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The MA in 21st Century Media Practice (formerly Media Production MA) aims to provide the ground for producing new and innovative forms of practice in media production that are socially, politically, economically and ethically engaged with everyday life. Read more
The MA in 21st Century Media Practice (formerly Media Production MA) aims to provide the ground for producing new and innovative forms of practice in media production that are socially, politically, economically and ethically engaged with everyday life. Joining a participatory and engaged community of practice is what makes the course a special and stimulating experience.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA is committed to opening up media education and practice to current debates and the massive changes occurring within the media landscape.

You will be involved in practical hands-on projects throughout the course using our extensive media resources.

Projects are based on a structured approach to research, writing, presentation and production.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Skye plus video Students are taken seriously as media producers. The course offers a creative space in which experimental and innovative ways of working can be accommodated.

It is based in critical practice and invites the students to respond to the problems of media production now and how it has been shaped by key historical practitioners.

By making students as much aware of the historical contingencies as they are of the latest practical, technological and theoretical developments within the profession, the MA in 21st Century Media Practice seeks to equip them with the means to construct new forms of material imagination.

This imagination is, by definition, a form of shared social and political engagement with the world.

Modules
-Critical Media Praxis
-Emergent Media Praxis
-Sensory Praxis
-Narrative Forms
-Final Project

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

With its emphasis on media futures and media business, this MA is ideal for you whether you are a graduate continuing from your BA or someone in the industry who wants time and space in a supportive yet rigorous atmosphere to look at where and how you want to work next.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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This programme is designed to furnish graduates, and other entry-qualified students who wish to further their scholarship, animation experience, practical application and reinforce their professional attributes, with an experience which will further encourage and develop their creativity, expand their practical capabilities and sharpen their media awareness and critical faculties. Read more
This programme is designed to furnish graduates, and other entry-qualified students who wish to further their scholarship, animation experience, practical application and reinforce their professional attributes, with an experience which will further encourage and develop their creativity, expand their practical capabilities and sharpen their media awareness and critical faculties.

Key Features

Students will develop the ability to initiate and carry out ambitious projects, (both personally and in teams) be personally decisive in complex and unpredictable contexts, manage their own learning, employ scholarly reviews and original materials relevant to their discipline and show critical self-judgement.

They will also extend intellectual development abilities, such as reflective critical thinking and analytical approaches to creative design with an awareness of social, ethical and cultural implications. Above all, students will become much better animators.

Modules

-3D Animation (Part I)
-Production Methods (Part I)
-Production Management (Part I)
-Pre-Production (Part I)
-Post Production (Part I)
-Major Project (Part II)

Assessment

The programme is assessed through course work and oral presentations/examinations in accordance with the awarding body's regulations. The course work is varied and the nature of assessment depends on the nature of the outcomes being assessed. Students receive, as part of the Student Handbook, details of the assessment scheme used to assess work. Specific assessment criteria is contained in individual assignment briefs which are given to each student at the start of each assignment/project.

Career Opportunities

So far the programme has an excellent track record in respect of students being employed by the animation industry. Since the first cohort of animation students completed in 2010, the following companies have employed SDM graduates:
-The Mill
-Framestore
-Icreate
-Tonto Films
-Tornado Films

Further Information

The 3D Computer Animation Industry demands a potential employee who has a professional attitude, who has a range of creative and practical attributes and who is self-motivated, team compatible and who will make up for their lack of experience by raw enthusiasm and willingness to constantly learn. This programme has been devised to produce such a person.

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The Master’s Degree in Academic Writing Theory and Practice offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. Read more
The Master’s Degree in Academic Writing Theory and Practice offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. The course focuses on writing, rhetoric and literacies research and on the ways this research informs the teaching of writing. The programme is based upon Coventry University’s international reputation in the teaching of academic writing at the Centre for Academic Writing.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

As part of the programme, you can:
-Facilitate academic writing for students and academics
-Situate academic writing in English in a knowledge economy
-Research academic writing
-Submit a portfolio of professional practice or a dissertation for your MA degree project

Full-time and part-time routes are also available.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

-Teaching Academic Writing
-Supporting Academics, Postgraduates and Professionals in Writing for Publication
-Forms and Practices of Disciplinary Writing
-Writing Programme Development and Management
-Researching Academic and Professional Writing: Text Focus
-Researching Academic and Professional Writing: Practices and Processes
-Academic Writing and the Transnationalisation of Knowledge
-Rhetorical Theory
-Dissertation Research and Writing
-Professional Portfolio in Supporting Academic Writing

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OVERVIEW. The Master’s Degree in Academic Writing Theory and Practice offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Master’s Degree in Academic Writing Theory and Practice offers a new type of qualification aimed at graduates and professionals interested in studying, researching and teaching writing. The course focuses on writing, rhetoric and literacies research and on the ways this research informs the teaching of writing. The programme is based upon Coventry University’s international reputation in the teaching of academic writing at the Centre for Academic Writing.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Module information

Mandatory modules

Teaching academic writing,
supporting academics, postgraduates and professionals in writing for publication,
forms and practices of disciplinary writing,
writing programme development and management,
researching academic and professional writing: text focus,
researching academic and professional writing: practices and processes,
academic writing and the transnationalisation of knowledge,
rhetorical theory,
dissertation research and writing,
professional portfolio in supporting academic writing
Masters with Merit is awarded for an overall mean mark of 60% but less than 70% Masters with Distinction is awarded for an overall mean mark of 70% or higher.

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MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. Read more
MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. On another level, it is a thought-provoking, life-changing reflection on the function and art of the actor – exploring techniques from some of Europe’s most influential practitioners as well as innovative professional practice from the UK and internationally.

Example structure

We offer dynamic and unique course for actors, directors, technical theatre specialists and students of theatre practice. Training at East 15 draws upon 50 years of tradition combined with a keen sense of the world of stage and screen today.

First Term
In the first term, there are classes in movement, voice and singing, as well as contextual studies. The entire programme of teaching across the course coheres to lead the actor from an exploration of personal self to that of the body in time and space and from there to the creation of character and the realisation of text.

Acting classes promote the development of intuitive, creative responses which are then framed by the introduction of techniques to build character and play actions. Showings of short naturalistic scenes give opportunity to integrate and apply technical voice and movement work in the context of an acting exercise.

Second Term
In the second term, skills classes continue. The acting work begins with an intensive Shakespeare module which develops and strengthens the integration of technical skills with acting technique. This is followed by the Research Performance Project in which you engage with specific time in history and experience East 15’s distinctive Living History Project.

This signature project is a non-performed improvisation in which the actor can, through rigorous ‘actor-centric’ research and a residential period away from the campus environment, experience and identify with the practical and visceral realities, as well as the psychological and emotional attributes of the character.

Subsequent to this you devise a studio performance based on your intellectual, emotional and sensory experience. You are also given responsibilities in stage management and production to enhance your overall understanding of what it is to make theatre and to prepare you for the realities of the industry.

Towards the end of term two participants begin to research and develop their MA project.

Third Term
The first part of Term Three focuses on media. The film project teaches skills of acting for the camera and provides material for the actor’s show reel. The radio drama project teaches radio skills and microphone technique and provides material usable in a voice reel. At the same time, you begin work on your MA Projects. The MA Projects involve working in small groups on self-generated projects, in which participants are given independence and autonomy as company members. These are performed in East 15’s Corbett Theatre or in other venues as appropriate.

The second half of term 3 sees a full production of a text-based play usually in our on-campus Corbett Theatre.

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This is a unique professional course that has been designed specifically for overseas students. MA Acting (International) offers the full spectrum of acting skills, including voice, movement and singing and approaches to rehearsal and public performances. Read more
This is a unique professional course that has been designed specifically for overseas students. MA Acting (International) offers the full spectrum of acting skills, including voice, movement and singing and approaches to rehearsal and public performances. The course focuses on advanced practical acting skills and also takes in the study of Shakespeare and other classical traditions.

Example structure

We offer dynamic and unique course for actors, directors, technical theatre specialists and students of theatre practice. Training at East 15 draws upon 50 years of tradition combined with a keen sense of the world of stage and screen today.

First Term
The first term includes the module Acting Technique based on the Stanislavsky approach, which addresses the key physical and vocal skills for acting, enabling students who are coming from a variety of training traditions to identify and achieve the required level of preparation for the subsequent modules.

It also allows tutors to make a diagnostic assessment of your skills and potential, and identify and implement any additional work in these core areas.

The module on Shakespeare enables you to develop your understanding of the meaning and mechanics of Shakespeare’s text. It introduces you to specific vocal techniques for the performance of Renaissance text and allow you to consider how a range of archaic and contemporary performance settings influence the actor’s and director’s approaches to Shakespeare in performance.

In addition, you study a range of analytical and experimental approaches to script that are useful to the actor and there are opportunities to develop your clarity, accuracy, and expressiveness in speaking Renaissance text. The Shakespeare module normally includes a two-week workshop at Shakespeare’s Globe, where you have an opportunity to perform on the Globe stage.

Second Term
The second term includes the Character and Scene Study module which extends the work begun in Acting Technique. It uses a Realist approach to acting as its base, allowing you to pursue longer and more challenging acting explorations. Scene work is undertaken on scripts by, for example, Ibsen, Strindberg, and Realist texts from the last 50 years. The module extends and applies Realist acting techniques, and includes a study of theories and assumptions underlying Realism.

A module on Contemporary UK Texts introduces you to key contemporary texts from the UK theatre, and to scripts from the twentieth-century that continue to have a place in and to influence contemporary UK theatre. It allows you to extend your vocal, physical, and analytical skills in the creation of roles that reflect a current cultural context and offers an opportunity to create and perform a complete role in the context of a fully staged play.

Third Term
You work on a written dissertation or a practical project. The year usually culminates in a full length production in a London venue.

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Why Surrey?. This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills. Read more

Why Surrey?

This Guildford School of Acting (GSA) programme emphasises practical actor training, delivered via a series of project workshops and rehearsals supported by extensive classes in relevant technical skills.

GSA is one of the UK’s leading accredited drama schools, providing dedicated conservatoire training within a purpose built environment on the University of Surrey campus.

Programme overview

The MA Acting programme is specifically designed for those seeking a career in the performing arts, and who already have an undergraduate degree or have a minimum of five years’ professional experience.

This intensive programme offers practical training which focusses on the acquisition of technical skills in acting, voice and movement.

These support a range of rehearsal projects, screen acting projects and public performances. Students also take professional development workshops and classes in audition technique.

Cohorts are kept small to ensure that students receive the maximum amount of personal attention and contact.

Performance opportunities include a devised project, a final public production led by a production team of industry professionals, and a West End Showcase.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Advanced Practice module.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To deepen experiential knowledge and critical understanding of the practice of acting
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the techniques and methodologies that constitute a personally evolved rehearsal process
  • To develop an integrated technical approach to the practice of acting in rehearsal and performance
  • To provide an ensemble training context for the development of professional acting skills based on practical and theoretical understanding and reflective practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An experiential and theoretical knowledge of key practical acting methodologies
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the physical and vocal techniques required to maintain an expressive body and the optimum functionality of the voice
  • A critical understanding of key theoretical and methodological developments in the practice of acting
  • An advanced understanding, which will inform ongoing skill attainment, of the application of technique to differing theatrical forms, styles, genres and historical contexts
  • A comprehensive understanding of current industry practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Recognise, interpret and contextualise approaches to performance texts
  • Identify and develop an individual methodological approach to rehearsal
  • Select vocal and physical techniques appropriate to voice, person and situation
  • Recognise and respond appropriately to the demands of different performance media
  • Critically analyse and reflect on their own and others’ practice

Professional practical skills

  • Successfully apply integrated vocal and psycho-physical techniques to the practice of acting in differing media
  • Sustain and develop an effective and creative individual rehearsal process
  • Demonstrate creative and imaginative work in performance
  • Contribute effective and appropriate practices and concepts to an ensemble process
  • Demonstrate evidence of practical research and effective preparation for entry into the current performance industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Be disciplined and consistent in a professional context
  • Conduct themselves constructively, positively, and sensitively towards others
  • Able to lead and collaborate as part of the team on practical and research projects
  • Communicate effectively and at an advanced level in both verbal and written form
  • Seek out, critique, and employ information appropriately
  • Recognise and develop commercial and artistic career opportunities

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Degree information

This programme has been developed to respond to educational practitioner needs in both UK and International settings.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

The PG Diploma is awarded for 120 credits in any available modules. The PG Certificate is awarded for 60 credits in any available modules.

Core modules
There is only one true core module for the MA Advanced Educational Practice which is a research methodology module, usually completed before or alongside the dissertation or report thesis. Students are encouraged to identify a theme to study compatible modules up to 60 credits which can be taken from any 'core' module listed below.
-The Action Researcher: exploring issues and contexts (the 'core' module)
-Teacher as Author: curriculum design and development
-Supporting Learners and Learning
-Developing Mentoring Practices
-Independent Study Module
-Assessing Colleagues' Learning
-Developing the Role of the Tutor

Optional modules
The optional modules for the MA Advanced Educational Practice are any of the available modules within the programme (as listed below) or any UCL Institute of Education modules residing in other MA programmes. These are only available at the discretion of the Module Leader and the Advanced Educational Practice Programme Leader.
-Independent Study module
-Developing the Role of the Tutor
-Supporting Learners and Learning
-Teacher as Author: Curriculum Design and Development
-Assessing Colleagues' Learning
-Developing Mentoring Practices
-Participants may also bring 60 credits into this MA from successful completion of a PGCE (Primary, Secondary or Post-Compulsory routes).

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates either in a report of 10,000 words (30 credits) or a dissertation of 20,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
All modules are taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. All participants are assessed through coursework (which may be a long essay, portfolio or presentation) at the end of each module and receive both formative written assessment on a draft and summative written assessment following final submission.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is ranked first in the world for education for the third year running (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016) and first in the UK for research strength (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

This programme has been developed to respond to educational practitioner needs in both UK and International settings.

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Course Overview

The course is based on individual, bespoke tuition provided by a team of distinguished coaches, including Dennis O’Neill, the Academy Director, Nuccia Focile, Jane Samuel, and a number of visiting consultants, such as Dame Kiri te Kanawa (WIAV’s honorary president), Ryland Davies, Anne Murray, Richard Bonynge, Joseph Rouleau, and so on. There are also master classes, group teaching classes and participation in public events and professional placement.

Key Features

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Assessment

Part 1
-80% Recital
-20% Academic Interview (Vivas)
-One Portfolio Module

Part 2
-70% Recital
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Career Opportunities

Graduates from the programme will have significantly enhanced employment prospects. This is demonstrated by the destinations of graduates from pre-cursor progress and WIAV alumni.

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