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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Read more
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Once an academic advisor has been assigned for your program of study, you should make an appointment to discuss your preferences and career aspirations. The program of study that you accept when you enter the program will be the one you will follow until you graduate. If there are any changes, they need to be approved by your advisor.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/macmhc/

The master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is designed to prepare students for employment and practice in public and private mental-health settings. The curriculum offers course work and applied experiences for students’ specialty interests to include areas such couple/family counseling, addictions counseling, play therapy, and similar specialty practice with unique populations or using unique methods of counseling. The clinical mental health counseling program is 60 credit hours and meets accreditation criteria put forward by Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program: Select Courses

While the majority of your courses will be offered through the Program in Counselor Education (designated as BCE) many required courses will be offered by affiliated programs. During your academic career, you will likely enroll for courses in Educational Psychology (designated as BEP), Educational Research (designated as BER), School Psychology (designated as BSP), and other areas. These courses afford the opportunity to take advantage of the expertise of faculty in other programs in the College of Education. Please refer to the Program Planning Record for Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

BCE 512 – Counseling: Theory and Process. Three hours. Introduction to counseling, counseling theories, and the counseling relationship; and an overview of the counseling process.

BCE 513 – Career Development. Three hours. An introduction for counselors and teachers to career development concepts, labor force information, and other resources needed to help persons with career planning and decision making.

BCE 514 – Counseling Skills. Three hours. An experiential course involving applied elements of theoretical models and customary helping skills to orient and prepare students for their initial supervised work with counseling clients.

BCE 515 – Practicum in Counseling I. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 514 and permission of the faculty. Laboratory training in attending, listening, and influencing skills. Supervised experience in counseling.

BCE 516 – Practicum in Counseling II. Three hours. Prerequisites: BCE 515 and permission of the faculty. Supervised practice in counseling.

BCE 518 – Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three hours. Seminar and fieldwork designed to acquaint the student with the functions and roles of the counselor in various community and agency settings.

BCE 521 – Group Procedures in Counseling and Guidance. Three hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Background in group methods, including group guidance, group counseling, and group dynamics. One-half of class time is spent in a laboratory experience during which each student is provided an opportunity to function in a group.

BCE 522 – Individual and Group Appraisal. Three hours. Prerequisite: BER 540. An overview of measurement methods, practice in administration and interpretation of standardized tests, and evaluation of tests and testing programs for counseling and guidance.

BCE 525 – Internship in School and Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three to twelve hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Supervised field experience in an appropriate job setting.

BCE 528 – Advanced Seminar in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 518. Advanced study and discussion of a variety of agency-specific issues and topics.

BCE 611 – Multicultural Counseling. Three hours. This course is designed to introduce students to multicultural issues unique to counseling and other helping professions.

BCE 650 – Counseling Strategies for Family Relationships. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 512 or permission of the instructor. Examination of theoretical and applied elements of systemic intervention with troubled families.

BER 500 – Introduction to Educational Research. Three hours. An overview of the research process, primarily for master’s students.

BER 540 – Statistical Methods in Education. Three hours. Descriptive and basic inferential statistics, including graphs, frequency distributions central tendency, dispersion , correlation, and hypothesis testing. Computer applications are included.

BEP 550 – Life span Development. Three hours. A study of principles and concepts of physical, cognitive personality, and social development from conception through death.

BSP 660 – Psychopathology. Three hours. Thorough examination of the history, scope, and understanding of abnormal behavior through the life span, with emphasis on educational and clinical implications. The most recent classification system is used to structure topics and issues in the course.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. Read more
The master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to prepare rehabilitation counselors to serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings. The rehabilitation counseling program is 48 credit hours and is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Mission

Professional rehabilitation counselors encourage and support persons with disabilities and their families to fully participate in their community by providing individual and group counseling, vocational assessment, case management, advocacy, assistive technology, and consultation services to help meet their personal, social, vocational, psychological, independent living, and quality of life goals. The mission of the Rehabilitation Counselor Education (RCE) distance-based program at the University of Alabama is to prepare professional rehabilitation counselors who will provide quality rehabilitation counseling services for persons with disabilities from diverse backgrounds and their families.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/marehab/

In addition to objective of the Program in Counselor Education, the RCE Program has the following objectives:

Objectives

1. To introduce the philosophy and historical tenets of rehabilitation counseling through new literacies of technology and interpersonal communication.

2. To deliver a 21st century, distance-based curriculum of didactic and clinical experiences that encourages active learning and adheres to the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards.

3. To prepare qualified rehabilitation counselors to work in both public and private settings located in rural and urban communities to facilitate the needs of all persons with disabilities and their families.

4. To recruit, select, and matriculate rehabilitation counseling graduate students who represent minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities.

5. To provide our rehabilitation counseling graduate students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a philosophical orientation and approach reflective of their commitment to meeting the needs of persons with disabilities and their families, as well as employer and community needs.

6. To foster our university’s mission in advancing the intellectual and social condition of the people by communicating to our rehabilitation graduate counseling students the need for advocacy, community integration, and social responsibility.

7. To prepare our rehabilitation counseling graduate students to become ethical rehabilitation counselors by understanding and following the Code of Professional Ethics for rehabilitation counselors.

8. To promote the involvement of our rehabilitation counseling graduate students in rehabilitation counseling professional associations (e.g., National Rehabilitation Association, National Rehabilitation Counseling Association, American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, National Rehabilitation Counselors and Educators Association) to enhance awareness of professional issues and service that are important to the growth of our field.

The RCE master’s program is 48 semester hours in length. However, a 60-semester hour option is available for students who wish to pursue 60 hours of graduate coursework. The curriculum provides both didactic and experiential learning and culminates in a 600 hour internship under the supervision of a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. The RCE program is fully accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE). Students completing the RCE program are eligible to become Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC). For more information about becoming a CRC, visit the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification website: http://www.crccertification.com/

The RCE program is an on-line program. Distance students must meet criteria for full or conditional admission. Distance students who can enroll for 9 hours (fall and spring) and 6 hours (summer) may complete the degree program in two calendar years. Distance students may take more or fewer hours each semseter with advisor approval. Some rehabilitation courses are offered as synchronous courses and will require weekly participation via live virtual classroom.

In most states, program graduates are eligible to begin the process of becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). The following link provides a listing of counselor licensure boards in all of the states: http://www.counseling.org/Counselors/LicensureAndCert/TP/StateRequirements/CT2.aspx

Employment Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook (2009), jobs for rehabilitation counselors are expected to grow by 19%, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Rehabilitation counselors serve persons with disabilities in a variety of work settings including, but not limited to, state-federal vocational rehabilitation agencies, non-profit community rehabilitation programs, private-for-profit rehabilitation companies, rehabilitation hospital settings, community mental health and substance abuse programs, correctional facilities, and private practice.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Read more
All Counselor Education Master’s degree programs have a planned program of study. The plan follows the appropriate requirements for accreditation in that area. Once an academic advisor has been assigned for your program of study, you should make an appointment to discuss your preferences and career aspirations. The program of study that you accept when you enter the program will be the one you will follow until you graduate. If there are any changes, they need to be approved by your advisor.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/esprmc/counseling/maschool/

The master’s degree in School Counseling is designed to provide prospective school counselors with the skills necessary to establish and conduct effective developmental guidance and counseling programs in schools, pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Students preparing for positions in School Counseling are provided experiences qualifying them for work at all levels of school counseling. The school counseling program is 48 hours and meets accreditation criteria of National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

School Counseling Program: Select Courses

While the majority of your courses will be offered through the Program in Counselor Education (designated as BCE) many required courses will be offered by affiliated programs. During your academic career, you will likely enroll for courses in Educational Psychology (designated as BEP), Educational Research (designated as BER), School Psychology (designated as BSP), and other areas. These courses afford the opportunity to take advantage of the expertise of faculty in other programs in the College of Education. Please refer to the Program Planning Record for School Counseling.

BCE 511 – Principles of Guidance. Three hours. Explores the rationale for guidance by examining human development and sociological, psychological, and philosophical bases for guidance. Provides awareness of services by surveying components of guidance programs.

BCE 512 – Counseling: Theory and Process. Three hours. Introduction to counseling, counseling theories, and the counseling relationship; and an overview of the counseling process.

BCE 513 – Career Development. Three hours. An introduction for counselors and teachers to career development concepts, labor force information, and other resources needed to help persons with career planning and decision making.

BCE 514 – Pre-practicum in Counseling. Three hours. An experiential course involving applied elements of theoretical models and customary helping skills to orient and prepare students for their initial supervised work with counseling clients.

BCE 515 – Practicum in Counseling I. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 514 and permission of the faculty. Laboratory training in attending, listening, and influencing skills. Supervised experience in counseling.

BCE 516 – Practicum in Counseling II. Three hours. Prerequisites: BCE 515 and permission of the faculty. Supervised practice in counseling.

BCE 521 – Group Procedures in Counseling and Guidance. Three hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Background in group methods, including group guidance, group counseling, and group dynamics. One-half of class time is spent in a laboratory experience during which each student is provided an opportunity to function in a group.

BCE 522 – Individual and Group Appraisal. Three hours. Prerequisite: BER 540. An overview of measurement methods, practice in administration and interpretation of standardized tests, and evaluation of tests and testing programs for counseling and guidance.

BCE 523 – Program Development and Management. Three hours. An examination of the organization and implementation of the guidance functions of schools and the guidance responsibilities of counselors, teachers, and administrators.

BCE 525 – Internship in School and Community Counseling. Three to twelve hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty. Supervised field experience in an appropriate job setting.

BCE 650 – Counseling Strategies for Family Relationships. Three hours. Prerequisite: BCE 512 or permission of the instructor. Examination of theoretical and applied elements of systemic intervention with troubled families.

BCE 611 Multicultural Approaches to Counseling. Three hours.

Prerequisites: Majors only or with instructor permission. This course is designed to introduce students to multicultural issues unique to counseling and other helping professions.

BER 500 – Introduction to Educational Research. Three hours. An overview of the research process, primarily for master’s students.

BER 540 – Statistical Methods in Education. Three hours. Descriptive and basic inferential statistics, including graphs, frequency distributions central tendency, dispersion , correlation, and hypothesis testing. Computer applications are included.

BEP 550 – Life span Development. Three hours. A study of principles and concepts of physical, cognitive personality, and social development from conception through death.

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts. Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/. Read more
Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/

Application Process

Visit the UA Graduate School website where you will:

- Complete the online application http://graduate.ua.edu/application.

- Submit official GRE or MAT scores.

- Submit official transcripts from all previous post-secondary institutions attended.

- Submit a statement of purpose.

- Submit 3 letters of recommendation (one from your principal or supervisor).

Due Date for Applications

Applications for admission will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by April 1 for entry into a cohort that will begin the program in the subsequent summer. All applications for entry into a cohort that will begin in the spring are due November 1, and all applications for entry into a cohort that will begin the subsequent fall will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by July 1. All applicants for this program must provide a Supplemental EXP completed by their current and/or previous school system(s) verifying at least three full years of full-time, acceptable professional educational experience including at least one full year of full–time P-12 teaching experience. The original notarized form(s) should be sent to:

Dawn Bryant
Student Services & Certification
College of Education
The University of Alabama
Box 870321
Tuscaloosa, Al, 35487-0231

Portfolio

In addition to the general application materials required by the University of Alabama Graduate School and the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies, applicants must construct an application portfolio, as required by Ala. Admin. Code §290-3-3-.48(1)(b). For entry into a cohort beginning in the Summer Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by April 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Spring Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by November 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Fall Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by July 1.

The application portfolio must contain the following items:

- Three letters of recommendation, including one from the applicant’s principal or supervisor;

- Completed copy (all forms) of most recent performance appraisal to include the professional development component if available;

- Evidence of ability to improve student achievement;

- Evidence of leadership and management potential including evidence of most recent accomplishments in the area of educational leadership;

- Summary statement of applicant’s reasons for pursuing instructional leadership certification;

- Summary statement of what the applicant expects from the program; and,

- The applicant’s vitae.

Items should be placed in a large envelope in the order of the above list, have divider pages between items, and mailed to Vanessa Williams, The University of Alabama, Box 870302, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0302 or hand-delivered to 301 Graves Hall (main campus) or to the UA Gadsden Center.

Assessment Center

The purpose of the Assessment Center is to first fulfill the regulatory requirement of a face-to-face interview with each applicant. The Assessment Center will also include other activities designed to provide additional information, particularly with respect to candidate dispositions and candidate writing skills, to adequately assess candidate aptitude for instructional leadership.

Scheduled Assessment Centers appear below. Candidates electing to participate in an Assessment Center at the Gadsden Center should contact Dr. Brenda Mendiola ().

Cohort Numbers

Cohorts will be limited to twenty-five participants at two locations: Tuscaloosa (main campus) and at the UA Gadsden Center. Additional cohorts will be admitted at either location, if there are sufficient eligible candidates and available faculty members.

Program of Study

The program of study for the Master of Arts Degree in Educational Leadership, leading to initial certification in Alabama for Instructional Leadership, will be composed of thirty (30) semester hours of coursework, including the following courses:

AEL 520: Leadership for Communities and Stakeholders (3 semester hours)
AEL 521: Leadership for Continuous Improvement (3 semester hours)
AEL 522: Leadership for Teaching and Learning (3 semester hours)
AEL 523: Human Resource Development (3 semester hours)
AEL 524: Ethics and Law (3 semester hours)
AEL 525: Management of Learning Organizations (3 semester hours)
AEL 526: Data-Informed Decision-Making (3 semester hours)
AEL 527: Internship in Instructional Leadership (3 semester hours)
BER 540: Quantitative Research; Statistics (3 semester hours)
BEF graduate-level Foundations Course from approved list (3 semester hours)
Total: 30 semester hours for Masters Degree in Educational Leadership

*Note: To receive certification at the “A” level, students are also required to have taken a special education survey course (SPE 300 or SPE 500 or the equivalent). If students have taken a special education survey course as part of the requirements for an earlier certificate, it will not have to be taken again. If students have not taken a special education survey course for an earlier certificate, SPE 500 must be taken in addition to the 30 semester hours detailed above.

Field experience objectives, including progression from observation through participation to leading behaviors, will be embedded in each course and assessed by the faculty member of record for each course. Throughout this program, instructional activities are aligned with instructional objectives. The faculty member of record has the responsibility of assigning the LiveText assessment (1, 2, 3, 4) for each objective, and instructional activities will also generate documentation for the electronic portfolio aspect of LiveText, which will append to the assessment ratings.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
You must first be accepted into The University of Alabama, and then into a degree program in the College. For graduate admissions, visit the Graduate School home page. Read more
You must first be accepted into The University of Alabama, and then into a degree program in the College. For graduate admissions, visit the Graduate School home page.

A minimum of 30 hours of course credit must be earned, as follows: curriculum and teaching, 6 hours; foundations of professional studies, 3 hours; evaluation of teaching and learning, 3 hours; teaching field, 12 hours; electives (which may be specified), 6 hours. If the special education requirement has not been fulfilled, the student may be required to complete an additional 3-hour survey course in special education. Students may not count more than 6 hours in certain seminar/workshop/problems courses toward the completion of the degree. A maximum of 12 hours of transfer credit, if approved by the student’s advisor, may be applied toward the degree. Students should see their advisers regarding which courses are appropriate for transfer credit.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/ci/elem/ma/

The Elementary Education program

The Elementary Education program at The University of Alabama emphasizes the contextual basis for learning, particularly within the ever-expanding global community that includes many diverse kinds of learners and educators. Our initial and advanced degree programs are dedicated to developing professionals and scholars who understand and can apply theories of teaching and learning. We seek to graduate accomplished educators who reflect through their teaching and scholarship a deep understanding of pedagogy, content, and the nature of the learner.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Health Science offers a Master of Arts in Health Studies. This program is tailored to train Health Promotion professionals to design, implement and evaluate interventions to foster behaviors conducive to health. Read more
The Department of Health Science offers a Master of Arts in Health Studies. This program is tailored to train Health Promotion professionals to design, implement and evaluate interventions to foster behaviors conducive to health. All of our graduate programs are theory-driven and based on related research findings. Completion of the Master of Arts Program qualifies students to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam. The CHES certification, offered by NCHEC, is the only mechanism for demonstrating competence in Health Education in the US.

Program Guidelines: This 30 semester hours program has a core of 18 credit hours of required coursework and requires an additional 12 credit hours of electives. The entire Masters program can be completed on campus or via distance education (http://bamabydistance.ua.edu//degrees/ma-in-health-studies-online/).

**Students may transfer 12 graduate credit hours into the program (subject to advisor approval) or take a minimum of 12 credit hours of electives, independent study, or fieldwork courses from UA. Transfer credits can be no older than 6 years from the date the student graduates from UA.

Students interested in the on campus Master of Arts in Health Studies should contact Dr. Dave Birch at for further information on the program or advice related to application procedures. Students interested in the Distance MA program should contact Dr. Brian Gordon at . Other applicable guidelines include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Students need to be aware of and adhere to guidelines established by The University of Alabama′s Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/).

- Students should select courses and plan a course of study in consultation with their faculty advisor.

- Students need to select either the thesis or non-thesis option after the completion of 12 semester hours of coursework.

- Students are required to earn a minimum of 30 semester hours for degree completion.

Visit the website http://www.health.ches.ua.edu/master-of-arts-in-health-studies.html

REQUIRED COURSES (18 HOURS)

HHE 515: Advances in Health Science
HHE 520: Health Behavior
HHE 530: Health Promotion Techniques
HHE 565: Organization and Implementation of Health Promotion Programs
HHE 566: Evaluation of Health Education and Promotion
HHE 506: Techniques of Research

ELECTIVE COURSES (12 HOURS MINIMUM)

Acceptable support courses include but are not limited to:

BEP 561: Social and Cultural Basis of Behavior
BEP 565: Personality and Social Development
BER 540: Statistical Methods in Education
BSP 500: Intro to School Psychology
CHS 500: Rural Environ/Occup Health
CHS 525: Biostatistics
HCM 573: Survey Issues in Health Care Management
HCM 577: Ambulatory Care
HCM 576: Long-Term Care
HD 501: Child Development
HD 512: Adult Development
HHE 504: Health Counseling
HHE 526: Biostatistics
NHM 532: Advanced Nutrition Counseling and Education
NHM 561: Advanced Nutrition
NHM 569: Advanced Community Nutrition
NHM 557: Childhood Obesity (Summer only)
NHM 648: Secondary Analysis of Survey Data (summer only)
WS 579: Gender Race Class Cross Culture

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

All students are required to pass a six hour written comprehensive examination that addresses the content of the six core courses in order to obtain their Master of Arts degree. This exam is proctored and students may not use any outside resources. Each one of the two parts of the exam is graded as “passed”, “passed with contingency”, or “failed”. Sections “passed with contingency” require additional work before the contingency can be lifted. Failed sections must be retaken. Failed sections can only be retaken once.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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University of Alabama College of Education
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
We have two exciting opportunities for students to receive a master of arts in Higher Education from The University of Alabama. One is on our main campus in Tuscaloosa and the other is in Northeast Alabama at the University’s Gadsden Center. Read more
We have two exciting opportunities for students to receive a master of arts in Higher Education from The University of Alabama. One is on our main campus in Tuscaloosa and the other is in Northeast Alabama at the University’s Gadsden Center.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/hea/ma/

The Master of Arts is a 36-hour degree program and is designed for students seeking to enter a range of professional careers in higher education. Students gain academic preparation necessary for entry-level leadership positions. Additionally, the MA program offers current two-or four-year administrators an opportunity to expand their skills and improve their understanding of the entire institution. Because our classes are available in the evenings and on weekends at both our main Tuscaloosa campus and our Gadsden Center, the MA can be pursued without interrupting a professional career.

Master of Arts in Higher Education Program of Study (for students admitted before Fall 2014) (http://education.ua.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/MA_HEA_POS.pdf)

Master of Arts in Higher Education Program of Study (for students admitted after Fall 2014) (http://education.ua.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/MA-Program-Planning-Sheet-Higher-Ed-Fall-20141.pdf)

Program Requirements

Two plans are offered for the master’s degree:

Plan I. Candidates for the masters degree under Plan I must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit in coursework and write a thesis (a minimum of 6 semester hours of thesis research required).

Plan II. Candidates for the masters degree under Plan II must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit and complete a culminating or “capstone” experience as described under the Comprehensive Examinations section below. Both plans require a minimum of 18 semester hours in the major subject. With the approval of the major program, the remainder of the coursework may be completed in either the major or a related field.

In some divisions and in many departments of the University, candidates are required to do their work under Plan I. Candidates working under Plan II may be required to participate successfully in seminar or problem courses that will give them an acquaintance with the methods of research and an appreciation of the place and function of original investigation in the field.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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University of Alabama College of Education
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The Department of Kinesiology has as its mission the preparation of educators, researchers, and citizens who are professionally and academically prepared and are dedicated to addressing the physical activity needs of our society in school, community, work-site, health, medical, or athletic environments. Read more
The Department of Kinesiology has as its mission the preparation of educators, researchers, and citizens who are professionally and academically prepared and are dedicated to addressing the physical activity needs of our society in school, community, work-site, health, medical, or athletic environments. In this regard, the Department of Kinesiology is committed to diverse cultural, educational, scientific, and cross-disciplinary approaches that emphasize the total person. One vital aspect of these efforts is to understand and educate our students and the public in the science and benefits of human movement. We support a broad multi-disciplinary, technologically sophisticated, integrative perspective that identifies exercise, sport, and skill acquisition as critical factors in preparing children and adults to become healthy, knowledgeable, culturally sensitive, and valued members of society.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/kine/

The Department uses the same multi-disciplinary and integrative approach to address the physical activity issues of an aging, and many times, under-served adult population, emphasizing the role of behaviors in the quality of education, quality of life and prevention of illness. The relationships between physical activity in human beings and various sciences are emphasized. Students will gain an understanding of the development, interpretation, application, and dissemination of knowledge that relates physical activity to human well-being.

The degrees in human performance place an emphasis on the attainment of disciplinary knowledge in the anatomical, biomechanical, developmental, physiological, and sociological aspects of physical activity, explore how physical activity relates to human well-being, and offer a choice of an area of emphasis in physical education and exercise and sport science.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Department of Journalism offers the master of arts degree with a major in journalism. Students work closely with a faculty dedicated to the principles and practices of sound journalism and scholarly inquiry. Read more
The Department of Journalism offers the master of arts degree with a major in journalism. Students work closely with a faculty dedicated to the principles and practices of sound journalism and scholarly inquiry.

Visit the website https://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/

Research track

This traditional two-year master’s degree (http://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/research-track-2-year/) is well suited for applicants who plan to continue their graduate studies and pursue a doctorate, though many graduates have gone on to teach and/or practice journalism. The research track is designed for individuals who seek in-depth knowledge of some journalism-related topic or question, and the ability to gain this knowledge through systematic research. Topics may fall within a number of areas, including news media’s effects on society; issues or problems related to news content; problems within the journalism field or industry; journalism history; media law; and many others.

Often, individuals who pursue this track have some professional journalism background and are interested in pursuing a Ph.D. or teaching. However, the track is open to recent B.A. recipients and those with no journalism background.

Read more about the department’s research track (https://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/research-track-2-year/).

One-year professional track

The Department’s one-year master’s program in Community Journalism (http://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/professional-track-1-year/) is best suited for applicants who plan to pursue or continue a career in journalism. The program emphasizes the role of news media in communities (including small towns, urban areas or other kinds of communities), and is operated in partnership with the award-winning Anniston Star newspaper. This professional track is designed for those who seek to work professionally in writing, editing, visual journalism and/or digital journalism, but who also wish to develop their conceptual knowledge of the field, as well as critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

Most who pursue this track have some educational background in journalism, but limited professional experience. However, the program is open to those with no or limited journalism education.

Read more about the department’s one-year professional track (https://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/professional-track-1-year/).

Job Placement

The program has an impressive record of job placements. In the first seven years of our Community Journalism program, more than 80% of our graduates were working full time in journalism or were furthering their education within six months of graduation. This rate is significantly higher than the national average over the same period, according to the Annual Surveys of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates.

Find out how to apply here - https://jn.ua.edu/graduate-programs/how-to-apply/

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The history of business is set forth in its accounts. But accounting is more than record keeping—it is one of the most important, proactive and challenging fields of modern business, and a perfect fit for motivated and enterprising students. Read more
The history of business is set forth in its accounts. But accounting is more than record keeping—it is one of the most important, proactive and challenging fields of modern business, and a perfect fit for motivated and enterprising students. The Culverhouse School of Accountancy offers one of the most challenging programs of any American university.

Key benefits

- Enrollment means access to some of the nation's top accounting scholars, a huge network of alumni, top firms and organizations, great academic and career advising, and the best preparation for a career accounting for tomorrow's business today.

- Accounting students also enjoy access to a special Spring Internship Program that matches them with some of the best firms in the world: http://mycba.ua.edu/accounting/internships

Visit the website: http://culverhouse.ua.edu/academics/departments/accountancy

Course detail

Accountancy at the master's level replaces the rudiments of financial management with real hands-on experience. The Master of Accountancy degree program provides students with a greater understanding of accounting and business than is possible in an undergraduate program.

Purpose

The program prepares students for careers as professional accountants in financial institutions, government, industry, nonprofit organizations and public practice.

Format

Graduates are prepared to research various databases related to troublesome accounting problems, and to exercise judgment in making accounting-related decisions by drawing on their integrated, comprehensive body of accounting knowledge and experience—what all masters have in common.

Students must take a minimum of 30 hours of graduate courses, including a minimum of 21 hours of accounting courses as listed below. Up to nine elective hours, as approved by an advisor, may be chosen from 500-level courses and must be approved by the coordinator of the MAcc program. Students cannot receive graduate credit for a course if they have taken an equivalent course at the undergraduate level. Another accounting course should be substituted with the approval of the coordinator of the MAcc program.

- Required courses -

AC 512
Advanced Financial Reporting & Analysis

AC 523
Business Valuation & Performance Measurement

AC 532
Advanced Governance, Risk Assessment & Assurance

AC 534
Fraud Risk Management

AC 561
Accounting for Business Management

AC 589
Systems Analysis & Control

AC 597
Financial Statement Analysis

Students are encouraged to take electives in disciplines such as Data Mining, Business Analytics, Real Estate, and Finance. However, students are free to choose their own elective tracks.


How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

Student Financial Aid provides comprehensive information and services regarding opportunities to finance the cost of education at The University of Alabama. We recognize that financial assistance is an important key to helping reach your educational and career goals. The financial aid staff is dedicated to making the financial aid process as straightforward as possible. Visit the website to find out more: http://financialaid.ua.edu/

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University of Alabama College of Arts & Sciences
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
A master’s degree in American studies from The University of Alabama gives students an opportunity to explore their interests and develop writing and thinking skills that expand career options. Read more
A master’s degree in American studies from The University of Alabama gives students an opportunity to explore their interests and develop writing and thinking skills that expand career options.

Visit the website: http://ams.ua.edu/graduate/

Course detail

The flexibility of this two-year program gives you the freedom to take an interdisciplinary approach to intriguing questions, in a department that’s small enough to allow close interaction with faculty and fellow students, yet large enough to encompass a wide range of research interests.

Pursue your interests

This program allows graduate students to build on their academic backgrounds and interests through sustained study in a particular area. Our diverse faculty teaches a broad range of topics, and the program allows students to take courses in other departments, broadening their educational opportunities.

Format and assessment

Students may select of one two options: Plan I (consisting of 24 semester hours and a thesis) or Plan II (consisting of 30 semester hours).

All students take four required courses: American Experience I and II and American Studies Colloquium I and II. Students generally take these courses in their first year of the program. The American Experience courses survey American cultural history and introduce students to some of the prevalent texts, scholars, and ideas in the field of American Studies. The American Studies Colloquium, a sustained study that takes place over the course of two semesters, gives students the opportunity to develop a publishable paper on a topic of their choosing. In the course of this project, students do independent research, undergo peer review, and revise various drafts to produce a polished final paper.

In addition to the required courses, students can select from a range of elective courses. Student need at least six hours in seminar-style courses. Although the American Studies Department offers an array of courses each semester, students may choose to take up to nine hours outside of the department.

At the end of the program, students take comprehensive exams, which test their knowledge of the material that they encountered in their particular program of study. Many students find that comprehensive exams provide an exceptional way to review the things that they have learned in the program, and these exams also provide students who want to pursue a PhD with valuable experience doing this kind of exercise.

One of the unique aspects of the program is the opportunity to design and teach a course in your second year — to develop course ideas, design the syllabus, assign readings, and actually teach a subject you’re passionate about. In recent years students have taught courses on Woodstock, Walt Disney, Ronald Reagan, and modern gay America.

Work closely with faculty

The moderate size of our department creates an environment in which faculty are open and accessible, able to build close relationships with their students. And because our program offers only a master’s degree, here you won’t have to compete with doctoral students for faculty members’ time and attention.

Career options

This program prepares students for careers in journalism, public policy, law, public relations, historic preservation, academia, nonprofit organizations and more. While many of our graduate students go on to pursue doctorates at institutions nationwide, other students build meaningful non-academic careers from their connections and experiences in the program. Additionally, many students choose to do internships, which help them make career connections and earn academic credit.

How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

In the past five years (2011-2016), 90.6% of Alabama MA students have received funding. Whether supported by fellowships or graduate teaching assistantships – both of which include tuition, health insurance, and a stipend – the vast majority of our students receive financial assistance. Visit the website: http://ams.ua.edu/graduate/financial-aid/

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University of Alabama College of Arts & Sciences
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
A four-field approach is taken in the M.A. program, embracing Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology. Read more
A four-field approach is taken in the M.A. program, embracing Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, Linguistics and Cultural Anthropology.

Visit the website: http://anthropology.ua.edu/programs/graduate-programs/masters-degree/

Course detail

Each student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours. All students are required to complete satisfactorily a core curriculum composed of one graduate course in at least three of the four fields of anthropology:

- ANT 501 (Anthropological Linguistics);
- ANT 625 (Survey of the History of Archaeology);
- ANT 636 (Social Structure) or ANT 641 (Culture);
- and, ANT 670 (Principles of Physical Anthropology).

Additionally, a seminar in Research Methodology (ANT 600) is required.

These four core courses should be taken during the student’s first year in residence. Remaining credit hours are based on coursework in the student’s area of interest, and thesis hours for students taking the thesis option (see below).

Format and assessment

There are then three options for completing the degree. In a thesis option, the student writes a thesis based on original research. In the research paper option, the student either submits a paper for publication or presents a paper at a national meeting. In the non-thesis options, the student completes additional coursework. Any student interested in study beyond the master’s level should only take the thesis or research paper options.

All students must take and pass comprehensive examinations on their knowledge of the field of anthropology. The student will take three-hour written exams in at least three of the four subdisciplines. The selection of the three areas will be made in collaboration with the faculty advisor. All anthropology faculty will participate in composing the exam questions. The examinations are evaluated by the entire faculty of the department, and performance on the exam is certified by the student’s committee.

Admission

Entering students must provide evidence of having taken introductory-level courses in each of the four fields before taking the graduate courses. A student who has not had an introductory course may be required to take or audit the appropriate undergraduate course before enrolling in the graduate course.

Each student is required to demonstrate competency in either a foreign language or research skill (especially statistics).

How to apply: How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

Student Financial Aid provides comprehensive information and services regarding opportunities to finance the cost of education at The University of Alabama. We recognize that financial assistance is an important key to helping reach your educational and career goals. The financial aid staff is dedicated to making the financial aid process as straightforward as possible. Visit the website to find out more: http://financialaid.ua.edu/

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University of Alabama College of Arts & Sciences
Distance from Tuscaloosa: 0 miles
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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