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Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology, Swansea, United Kingdom

We have 8 Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology, Swansea, United Kingdom

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The MA in Equality and Diversity in Society is an exciting development in response to The Equality Act 2010 and global concerns regarding equality. Read more
The MA in Equality and Diversity in Society is an exciting development in response to The Equality Act 2010 and global concerns regarding equality. Awareness of equality and diversity is now seen as an integral requirement of many organisations, as well as an aspiration for society as a whole.

Course Overview

There is recognition that the underlying body of knowledge and theories surrounding equality and diversity, which are directly linked to social policy, sociology and social and cultural theory, are essential in developing informed professionals. This Master's Programme will extend professional knowledge and understanding and aims to develop reflective/reflexive practitioners through an integrated set of compulsory modules. This programme will give a sound understanding of equality and diversity and its implications for society, organisations, communities, families, individuals and policy-makers.

The Master's in Equality and Diversity in Society is grounded in the quest to ‘provide an understanding of the long-term and underlying causes of disadvantage that need to be addressed by public policy’ (Equalities Review, 2007: 13). To this end, the principle of equality and inclusion is embedded within and throughout the programme. The programme recognises that philosophers, economists, and political and social theorists debate the concepts of equality and diversity from a range of different perspectives; allowing the student to explore competing interpretations of what ‘equality’ and ‘diversity’ might mean in our society. Through engaging with ‘the intellectual traditions and perspectives of the social science, students will be encouraged to explore social processes and the links between theory, policy and practice. It allows students to debate societal issues, and promote engagement with ‘new ideas …. relating to issues such as the impact of globalisation on … social justice, sustainable development, social inclusion..’

Part I comprises four taught modules which can be access through weekend taught sessions or through an online virtual learning environment or through a blended learning approach.

Part II is the dissertation component where the student will explore an aspect of equality and diversity through either an extended literature review or primary research (15,000 words).

Modules

Part 1
SJEQ7001 - Researching and Reflecting upon Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
SJEQ7002 - The Personal and the Political: Influences on Policy, Affecting Individuals and Groups in the UK today
SJEQ7003 - Equality and Diversity: Power and Social (Re)production of Inequality
SJEQ7004 - Sustainable Communities: Equality in Action
SJEQ7008 - Equality, Gender and Sexual Diversity

Part 2
SJEQ7007 - Dissertation: Equality and Diversity in Society

Key Features

The public policy drive has highlighted the need for professionals who are able to understand ‘the complexities involved in social policy formation, implementation and development’ (SPA, 2007: 8). This programme has been designed both as a natural progression for BA Social Inclusion graduates, and as preparation for students who wish to enter or are already professionals working in a diverse range of fields (for example: teaching, health and/or social care, educational settings, probation service, voluntary organisations, youth support, community education, police services). It also acknowledges the Welsh Assembly Government’s vision for all teachers to be qualified to Master's level.

The programme is designed to enable students to further develop the range of skills gained at initial degree level, which transfer easily to the world of work:
-Communicating effectively
-ICT
-Researching, preparing and delivering presentations
-Making effective use of visual aids
-Working collaboratively or as part of a team
-Working to deadlines.

Further skills within this Master's programme will include:
-Creativity in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to develop and interpret knowledge
-Ability to acquire and critically analyse data and information, to evaluate their relevance and validity, and to synthesise a range of information in the context of new situations
-Conceptual understanding that enables the student to: evaluate the rigour and validity of published research and assess its relevance to new situations; extrapolate from existing research and scholarship to identify new or revised approaches to practice

(QAA: Master's Benchmark Statement for Business and Management, 2007: 5.1)

The programme encourages students to use critical skills in their professional practice to enable them to:
-Consistently apply their knowledge and subject-specific and wider intellectual skills
-Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and -Communicate their conclusions clearly to a range of audiences
-Be proactive in recognising the need for change and have the ability to manage change
-Be adaptable, and show originality, insight, and critical and reflective abilities which can all be brought to bear upon problem situations
-Make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations
-Evaluate and integrate theory and practice in a wide range of situations
-Be self-directed and able to act autonomously in planning and implementing projects at professional levels
-Take responsibility for continuing to develop their own knowledge and skills

(QAA: Master's Benchmark Statement for Business and Management, 2007: 5.2)

Evidence indicates that these are the skills that are highly valued by employers. Although it is not primarily a vocational programme, it prepares students to move in a vocational direction. Graduates are expected to secure employment or be in employment in a range of positions including:
-Child Care Officer
-Education Officer: Local Education Authority
-Family Aide
-Fostering Service Project Worker
-Health care professional
-Language and Numeracy Assistant
-Learning Coach
-Probation Officer
-Social Worker/Social Services
-Support Assistant for disabled people
-Teacher
-Voluntary youth organisation worker

Assessment

The assessments within this programme aim to not only allow a student to demonstrate their academic understanding but also ‘upskill’ them through the use of assessments directly related to the needs of employers in this field, including:
-Assignments
-Seminar presentations
-Reflective diaries
-Extended essays
-Questionnaire design
-Case studies
-Designing a leaflet and supporting academic paper
-Community profile
-Dissertation

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This course aims to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of children and childhood.

Key Features of Childhood Studies

Performance:

- strong links with a range of international networks and similar university departments in Europe and around the world

Teaching and Employability:

- excellent learning experience and cross cultural views because of international student cohorts

- opportunity to continue studies to pursue a PhD supervised by a well-qualified member of the team

- opportunity to take part in a local field trip

The course in Childhood Studies is designed for a wide range of professionals working with children.

A broad range of topics are covered and students are encouraged to critically reflect on their practice and address theory and research relevant to their own interests in Childhood Studies.

The Childhood Studies course will:

- reflect upon the nature of childhood as a concept and the way in which it comes to be construed as it is

- consider holistic child development in contemporary society

- reflect on childhood and family policy in a variety of contexts

- consider professional roles (one’s own and others) in relation to services for children and their families

- encourage critical analysis of research in relation to childhood

- encourage professional reflective practice.

Modules

Modules on the Childhood Studies course may include:

Researching Childhood

Understanding and Observing Child Development

Child Health

Children's Rights and Safeguarding Children and Young People

Perspectives on Play

Advanced Practice with Children

Therapeutic Work with Children

Childhood Illness

Childhood Nutrition and Growth

Staff Expertise

Team members are active researchers and their work is well published in Childhood Studies.

Childhood Studies students are encouraged to publish their own research – thereby demonstrating the high quality of their work.

Team members include:

Amy Brown – an expert in child health

Jill John – an expert in safeguarding and children’s rights

Pete King – an expert in child development and children’s play across children’s services.

Justine Howard – an expert in child development and play across children’s services

Zac Maunder – an expert in children’s emotional health

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, Childhood Studies students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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The MA in Cultural Astronomy and Astrology is a unique course which deals with the ways in which human beings attribute meaning to the planets, stars and sky, and construct cosmologies which provide the basis for culture and society. Read more
The MA in Cultural Astronomy and Astrology is a unique course which deals with the ways in which human beings attribute meaning to the planets, stars and sky, and construct cosmologies which provide the basis for culture and society.

Course Overview

The MA focuses on Cultural Astronomy and Astrology. We define Cultural Astronomy as the study of the application of beliefs about the stars to all aspects of human culture, from religion and science to the arts and literature. It includes the new discipline of archaeoastronomy: the study of astronomical alignments, orientation and symbolism in ancient and modern architecture. Astrology is the practice of relating the heavenly bodies to lives and events on earth. We therefore examine the relationship between astrological, astronomical and cosmological beliefs and practices, and society, politics, religion and the arts, past and present.

The MA is a hybrid of history and anthropology. As historians we pay attention to documentary evidence but are heavily influenced by recent trends in anthropology; this means that modern western culture can be subjected to the same academic scrutiny as pre-modern or non-western cultures, and by questions such as the requirement for the scholar or researcher to engage in practice as part of their study of practice.

The words astronomy and astrology have distinct meanings in modern English. Astronomy is the scientific study of the physical universe. Astrology is more akin to a study of the psychic universe. The split between the two, though, is a feature of modern western thought.

Both words are of Greek origin: astronomy means the ‘law’ of the stars, while astrology is best translated as the ‘word’, or ‘reason’, of the stars, so in the classical world their meanings overlapped. To the Greek scholar Claudius Ptolemy, writing in the second century CE, there were two forms of astronomy: one dealt with the movement of the stars, the other (which we would call astrology) with their effects or significance. From then until the 17th century, the two words were interchangeable. In ‘King Lear’, Shakespeare had Edgar refer to his brother Edmund, who had been posing as an astrologer, as a ‘sectary astronomical’.

Other terms Shakespeare might have used included mathematician (the astronomer Johannes Kepler studied astrology as part of his duties as ‘Imperial Mathematician’) or Chaldean (both astrology and astronomy were commonly traced to Chaldea, another term for Mesopotamia). Neither do most non-western countries employ different words to distinguish traditional astronomy from astrology.

In India both are jyotish, the ‘science of light’. In Japan they are onmyōdō, the ‘yin-yang way’. In China, the observation and measurement of celestial phenomena was inseparable from their application to human knowledge which, in turn, was divided into two, li, or li fa, calendar systems, and tian wen, or sky patterns. All cultures have ways of visualising the stars, many without a single name for the practice. The title of the MA, whose subject matter includes the beliefs and practices of pre-modern and non-western cultures, as well as contemporary worlds, is therefore necessarily ‘Cultural Astronomy AND Astrology’.

Modules

Students take six modules, and then write a 15,000-word dissertation based on independent research. There are three compulsory modules and students then take one ‘pathway’ of two optional modules, and any third optional module.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by 5,000 words of written work or the equivalent. For example, some modules require one short essay of 1,000 words and a longer, 4,000-word essay, normally due in week 10 to 12. Assessment requirements, lengths and due dates can vary from module to module. The shorter essays may be a critical review of a piece of writing, or be picked from a choice of two titles. For the longer essays there is a wider choice of titles. In some modules, the title and subject is negotiated with the course tutor. Each is then returned with comments from either one or two tutors, and students are offered the chance to have a tutorial via Skype in order to discuss the comments.

Students who take the entire MA then go on to write a 15,000-word dissertation based on a piece of independent research on a topic chosen by the student in discussion with the module tutor, and other appropriate members of staff. Each student is allocated a supervisor who can guide them through the research and writing process.

Career Opportunities

Most of our students take the MA as an end in itself because they love the subject. Some go on to study for PhDs, either with us, or at other universities.

The relationship between all academic work and non-academic employment is always based on potential employers’ appreciation of the generic skills acquired in MA study. Typically, these include critical thinking, communication skills, time-management and the ability to take on and complete independent projects. The latter quality is particular prized by many employers. One graduate is teaching at undergraduate level while another, a school teacher, was awarded a promotion and pay rise on her graduation.

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Swansea University College of Arts and Humanities
Distance from Swansea: 0 miles
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Gender and Culture offers an innovative interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach to the study of Gender and Culture.

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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The MA in Youth work offers both a professional qualifying route for those looking to gain a professional qualification in Youth Work and an academic route for those seeking CPD opportunities. Read more
The MA in Youth work offers both a professional qualifying route for those looking to gain a professional qualification in Youth Work and an academic route for those seeking CPD opportunities.

The MA is underpinned by a key set of principles and values and also addresses contemporary issues affecting work with Young People in society.

Course Overview

The MA Youth Work offers both a professional qualification in Youth Work and opportunities for CPD. The programme can be undertaken through the medium of Welsh and bilingually.

It is run on a flexible, part-time bases (twilight sessions and Saturdays); as well as the opportunity to study the non-qualifying route on a full or part time bases via flexible and distributed learning.

Youth Work is a profession with a clearly stated purpose, values, and principles. The key purpose of Youth Work in the United Kingdom is to:

‘Enable young people to develop holistically, working with them to facilitate their personal, social and educational development, to enable them to develop their voice, influence and place in society and to reach their full potential’

This statement refers to the holistic development of young people, recognising that personal, social and educational development can also include, for example, physical, political and spiritual development (LSIS, 2012).

Youth Work regards itself as rare among wider services for young people; being driven by a clear set of agreed values, these values are summarised in the National Occupational Standards for Youth Work and include:
-Participation and active involvement
-Equity, diversity and inclusion:
-Partnership with young people and others
-Personal, social and political development

The Programme is committed to a vision of Youth Work clearly based upon these principles, including the voluntary engagement of young people being fundamental to the process of Youth Work.

Additionally a form of Youth Work which empowers young people and adopts a stance where they are partners in the process of learning. The programme team are committed to teaching a form of Youth Work which has at its core the importance of providing safe environments for young people and of supporting the safety as well as their development and well-being. Fundamental to the MA in Youth Work are also the principles of equality and inclusion.

Modules

-Researching and Reflecting upon Youth and Community Practice
-Social Education
-Professional Practice
-Sustainable Communities
-Outreach and Detached Youth Work
-Adolescent Psychology
-Supervision and support skills

Key Features

-The MA Youth Work offers both a professional qualification in Youth Work and opportunities for CDD
-The programme can be undertaken bilingually.
-Fieldwork opportunities offering links to employment.
-Professionally Qualified staff who are research active.
-Opportunities to progress to PhD

Assessment

-Field Work Portfolios
-Essays
-Seminar Presentations
-Online discussions

Career Opportunities

-Youth and Community Worker
-Community Worker
-Learning Support Worker
-Health Based Youth Worker
-Young people’s Participation Worker
-Youth Justice
-Voluntary Sector

Professional Accreditations

The programme is a professionally endorsed programme by the Education and Training Standards for Wales.

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Swansea University College of Law and Criminology
Distance from Swansea: 0 miles
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology

• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system

• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills

• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

• Quantitative Methods

• Qualitative Methods

• Case Studies in Applied Social Research

• Data Visualisation

• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol

• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

• Applied Criminal Justice

• Understanding Policing

• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice

• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children

• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”



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Swansea University College of Arts and Humanities
Distance from Swansea: 0 miles
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Gender and Culture (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Key Features of MA in Gender and Culture

This is an interdisciplinary MA scheme in Gender and Culture taught by Gender specialists across the Arts and Humanities – in the subject areas of Development Studies, Political and Cultural Studies, English Literature, Egyptology, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies.

If you are interested in gender and gender relations in politics, literature, culture, and history, like engaging in discussion and intellectual argument, and are excited about the idea of working within and across different subject areas, this MA in Gender and Culture is ideal for you.

The MA Gender and Culture examines the production, reproduction and transformation of gender in culture and society.

The Gender and Culture degree is supported by the research activity of GENCAS, the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society in the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Gender and Culture course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. In part one, students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. In part two, students are required to write the dissertation component which draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year.

Part-time study is available for the Gender and Culture programme.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Gender and Culture is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Gender and Culture is the University of Regensburg. Founded in 1962, Regensburg is a renowned international centre of teaching and research. Although it has over 21,000 thousand students, the university offers a broad range of disciplines of study, as well as having excellent infrastructure and a favourable staff-student ratio. Regensburg is also active in research, with six special research areas supported by the German Research Society and a strong presence in German- and EU-funded research initiatives. The university has a significant international presence, offering exchange links with more than 200 European institutions and 45 overseas universities. Students will have access to the complete range of services and facilities offered at the university, along with inclusion in the many academic and social activities that take place. Located right in the heart of the old town of Regensburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the university is situated in the centre of a culturally and socially rich area with over 2000 years of history.

Gender and Culture Programme Aims

To develop independent thinking and writing. You devise your own essay projects in consultation with a gender specialist - this combines the benefits of expert guidance with the rewards of shaping an intellectual project for yourself. To sharpen and develop your skills and take them to a new level by providing the chance for original thinking and intellectual freedom in writing the ‘dissertation’ element, where you complete your own research project.

Modules

Modules on the Gender and Culture programme include:

• Women and Politics

• Civil Society and International Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Rights-Based Approaches to Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• Approaches to IR

• Violence, Conflict & Development

• Governance, Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• The Policy Making Process

• State of Africa

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• War in Space

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• War, Identity and Society

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Gender Trouble: the Medieval Anchorite, and Issues of Wombs and Tombs

• Women Writers of the 1940’s

• Women Writing India

• ‘The Great Pretender’: Masculinity in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• British Women’s Fiction 1918-1939

• Contemporary Women’s Writing

• Angela Carter

• Gender in Contemporary European Culture

• Literature in Social Context

• Women and Gender in Ancient Egypt

• Nature’s Stepchildren: European Medicine and Sexual Dissidents, 1869-1939

• The making of Modern Sexualities, 1650-1800

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Gender and Culture from a Classics and Ancient History, English, European Languages, History, Media Studies, and Political and Cultural Studies or related background. Professionals interested in the challenge of digital studying Gender and Culture. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to gender and culture.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Gender and Culture graduates. Our graduates are employed in diverse and dynamic vocations such as education, business, law and finance, marketing, sales and advertising; commercial, industrial and public sectors; media and PR; creative and professional writing; social and welfare professions; heritage and tourism; government and politics; foreign affairs and diplomatic corps; humanitarian organisations and some go on to study a PhD.



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The MA in Philosophy and Religion. Eastern and Western Thought is a distance-learning programme designed for students who want to explore important philosophical and religious issues about life and the nature of our existence, but don’t want to be limited in their study to one particular pathway or tradition. Read more
The MA in Philosophy and Religion: Eastern and Western Thought is a distance-learning programme designed for students who want to explore important philosophical and religious issues about life and the nature of our existence, but don’t want to be limited in their study to one particular pathway or tradition.

Course Overview

The MA in Philosophy and Religion: Eastern and Western Thought will explore key topics in philosophy and religion, such as the nature of the self, the nature of reality, and the nature of religious experiences, from various philosophical and religious perspectives, from both eastern and western traditions. It includes the study of Buddhist Philosophy, the Daoist and Confucian traditions of China, Analytic and Continental Philosophy, and theories and practices of Western Religions.

Modules

The MA consists of taking six taught modules and a writing 15,000 word dissertation. The choice of taught modules available are:
-The Self: East and West
-Buddhist Philosophy
-Chinese Conceptions of the Self
-Philosophy of Religion
-Mind & Body: Descartes and Wittgenstein
-Religion, Spirituality and Secularisation
-Religious Experience Today

Key Features

-The course is delivered via distance-learning and its structure allows students the flexibility to arrange their study around their other commitments.
-Students have access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that provides them with a wide range of electronic resources.
-Coursework assessment, with no exams.
-Students receive support from subject specialists in Philosophy, Religious Studies and Chinese Studies.

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