• Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Pennsylvania Featured Masters Courses
0 miles
Sociology×

University of Leeds, Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology

We have 11 University of Leeds, Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology

  • Sociology×
  • University of Leeds×
  • MA×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 11 of 11
Order by 
This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will allow you to benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to gain an in-depth understanding of key issues, debates and theoretical perspectives, and to critically analyse the relationship between culture, media and society.

Taught by leading researchers in the field, this programme covers key issues and concepts such as: media and social media; consumerism; audiences; representation; globalisation; migration and place; tourism; creative work and material culture. Through its grounding in sociological approaches to the study of culture and media, a concern with questions of power, inequality and identity will be threaded through the course, enabling you to think critically about the relationship between gender, class, race and ethnicity, and the cultural realm.

In addition to developing a specialist knowledge in the field, you will also acquire key transferable skills in research, communication, analytical skills, self-management and group working, which will open up a range of career pathways within the media and creative industries and beyond.

Highlights

  • Benefit from the expertise of both the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the School of Media and Communication.
  • Gain specialist knowledge in the areas of consumerism, media and social media, globalisation, representation and more.
  • Tailor the programme according to your interests with optional modules which cover PR, journalism, identity, cultural history and reality TV.
  • Develop transferable skills including in research, analysis, group work and communication.
  • Prepare for careers in PR, communications and media policy, social and digital media, media market, audience research and others.

Course content

Compulsory modules on Researching Society and Culture, Understanding Society and Culture, and Sociology of Media and Culture, will provide a solid grounding in key sociological theories for the study of society, culture and media, and methodological debates and approaches.

In addition to the core compulsory modules, you will have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules delivered by the School of Media and Communication, enabling you to tailor the programme to pursue your specialist interests.

The final dissertation project will allow you to design, develop and implement your own critical research enquiry into an aspect of culture and media.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Media & Culture) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Journalism Practice and Policy 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction? 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Society, Culture and Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Throughout the course you will be exposed to a variety of teaching methods including guest lectures, seminars, presentations, group work, blended learning and independent critical enquiry.

Assessment

Assessment will include a series of short quizzes, a group project, an essay and dissertation.

Career opportunities

The combined nature of the programme will equip you with key transferable skills and the specialist knowledge required to pursue a career in sociology or media and culture. The national and international growth of the media and creative industries has sparked greater demand for graduates who possess advanced skills and knowledge in the field, opening opportunities in communications and media policy, PR, social and digital media, media markets and audience research or other cultural and creative industries.

Additionally, the sociology element of the programme will allow you to apply your knowledge and skills in fields such as education, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities. The programme also provides a basis for progression onto a PhD in sociology and media studies, and a strong grounding for an interdisciplinary PhD.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Develop the skills and knowledge to produce meaningful social research with this challenging programme. Core modules will teach you how to turn social research issues and questions into workable research designs, as well as handling quantitative and qualitative data and issues such as ethics and funding applications. Read more

Develop the skills and knowledge to produce meaningful social research with this challenging programme.

Core modules will teach you how to turn social research issues and questions into workable research designs, as well as handling quantitative and qualitative data and issues such as ethics and funding applications. You’ll also have the chance to specialise through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to focus on research in topics such as disability studies, care, social policy analysis, criminology and evaluation of programmes and policies.

This taught programme has recently been redesigned to meet the new postgraduate training and development guidelines of the ESRC, meaning it stands alone as an MA but will also prepare you for doctoral research in this dynamic field of scholarship. You’ll be well prepared to become a specialist social science researcher, supported by expert tutors across our active research centres and institutes.

Research insight

You’ll learn in a research-intensive, stimulating environment. As well as the Leeds Social Sciences Institute which fosters collaboration, you’ll benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies, Centre for Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and many others. All of these centres run their own calendars of events such as workshops and seminars.

Find out more about Research in the School of Sociology and Social Policy

Course content

At the start of the programme you’ll build your knowledge of research design, learning to connect abstract theoretical and methodological perspectives with practical research strategies. Sampling and selection, choosing the right data collection and analysis methods, the ethics and politics of research design and creating research proposals will all be among the topics you explore.

You’ll also have the chance to deepen your subject knowledge with your optional module. You could focus on crime, social policy analysis or evaluative research as well as disability studies, care or social thought.

In Semester 2 you’ll begin intensive training in analysing quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll learn to use statistical software, design surveys and questionnaires and record, code, organise and manage qualitative data. You’ll evaluate different research methods, understanding the benefits, limitations, and ethical implications of each one and when to use them.

By the end of the programme in September, you’ll submit a research project that puts the skills you’ve gained into practice – and perhaps lay the foundations of your future research.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Dissertation 60 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Contemporary Social Thought 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social Research MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social Research MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to develop the research skills and theoretical knowledge you need. These include seminars, tutorials, and presentations. You’ll also attend practical sessions and workshops where you’ll get to grips with data analysis. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to refine your skills and prepare for your taught sessions.

Assessment

You’ll experience different assessment methods, including presentations, literature reviews, research proposals and essays. In data analysis modules, you’ll be expected to analyse and engage with data within your essays. We offer plenty of support with aspects such as academic writing.

Career opportunities

In the last decade there has been enormous growth in social research, leading to an increasing variety of career options. There are a number of different research environments, such as academic departments, third sector organisations, private research organisations and governmental agencies – all of which have distinctive research cultures.

There is an increasing emphasis on the production of high quality, rigorous and meaningful research by professionally trained researchers. We designed the MA in Social Research to provide such training, and the course will interest people pursuing, or enhancing, a research-related career in a wide range of settings.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This wide-ranging programme explores key concepts, methods, debates and applications in social and political theory. Core modules will introduce you to social and political thought and its relation to economic, social, political and cultural problems in a fast-changing, globalised world. Read more

This wide-ranging programme explores key concepts, methods, debates and applications in social and political theory.

Core modules will introduce you to social and political thought and its relation to economic, social, political and cultural problems in a fast-changing, globalised world. From the seminal works of Karl Marx to contemporary thinkers such as Judith Butler and Slavoj Zizek, you’ll think about how these approaches can help us understand social change on the global stage.

Beyond this, you’ll choose modules that suit your own interests – you could specialise in gender, racism and ethnicity studies, social policy, globalisation, care, health or disability among others. You can also pursue research training to prepare for further study.

Research insight - the Bauman Institute

You’ll become part of the Bauman Institute, launched in honour of Emeritus Professor Zygmunt Bauman to analyse social change around the world. It’s an exciting and stimulating research environment where you’ll learn from experts in their fields.

The Bauman Institute is inspired by Bauman’s sociological imagination, and has earned an international reputation for teaching and research. Bringing together researchers from diverse disciplines, it investigates the ways in which societies continue to evolve in areas such as power and resistance and the sociology of capitalism.

Course content

You’ll take core modules during the year that introduce you to different areas of social, sociological and political thought, from Marx and Weber to the Frankfurt School and recent feminist and psychoanalytic thinkers. You’ll consider the positioning and relevance of critical theory in relation to contemporary social phenomena.

These modules lay the foundations of the programme; you’ll build on them through your choice of optional modules which give you the chance to specialise. You could focus on areas such as research methods and design, healthcare, disability theory, globalisation, gender, racism and ethnicity studies or policy analysis and evaluation. If you’re planning to progress to PhD study, we’ll recommend you take modules focusing on research and data analysis.

At the end of the programme, you’ll submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research on a related topic of your choice, which allows you to demonstrate and apply the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Contemporary Social Thought 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Social and Political Thought) 60 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits

Optional modules

  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Sociology of Media and Culture 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Political Thought MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Political Thought MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our modules are taught using lectures, seminars and tutorials. Optional modules may also include workshops, online learning or other methods. However, independent study is still a crucial element of this programme, allowing you to develop your skills, pursue specific research interests and form your own ideas.

Assessment

Core modules are assessed using essays, as well as your final dissertation. Depending on the optional modules you choose, you may also be assessed using research reports, project work, presentations, literature and book reviews among other methods. If you select research methods modules, you’ll also be expected to engage with some data analysis in your essays.

Career opportunities

This programme will enable you to think critically with an ethical awareness and to understand how a consumer society has transformed social and political realities.

These qualities are crucially important for a wide range of potential careers from policy research to local authority and government roles, campaigning and political lobbying, work with development agencies and NGOs, and even entry to the academic profession and research-based employment.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities. Read more

This refreshed programme explores issues, concepts, and debates in social and public policy research to gain an insight into policy making and its social impacts on individuals and communities.

Core modules will explore social theories, issues and research methods relevant to social policy and welfare. You will also develop core skills in critical policy analysis and policy evaluation. There will be opportunities to study and debate current policy issues, such as work and welfare, child and family policy or the challenges of ageing populations, with a focus on real-life examples.

Supported by our well-known research centres and taught by expert tutors, you’ll tailor the programme to suit your own interests and career aspirations. With a range of optional modules to choose from, you could pursue further advanced research skills or study complementary social topics such as disability studies, gender studies, racism and ethnicity studies, or globalisation.

You’ll gain an insight into some of the most sensitive and complex social issues affecting governments worldwide.

Research insight

You’ll learn in a research-intensive, stimulating environment. As well as the Leeds Social Sciences Institute which fosters collaboration, you’ll benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies, Centre for Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and many others. All of these centres run their own calendars of events such as workshops and seminars.

From the start of the programme you’ll study core modules that introduce you to the social contexts and social problems that challenge policy makers, understanding society and social research. As the course develops you will focus more specifically on the welfare state, the process of social policy formation, and the kinds of evidence on which new policies and programmes are founded, and against which their effectiveness is evaluated.

You’ll gain a thorough understanding of research methods, the theoretical assumptions which underpin them and how these affect the way the findings are interpreted. You’ll also focus on specific examples such as welfare reform or employment activation policies.

With this foundation, you’ll choose from optional modules to specialise in topics that suit you. You could study contemporary social thought to contextualise your work, or look at issues such as labour mobility, care, healthcare, disability or ‘race’ and ethnicity. You could study further data analysis and research methods to prepare for future research.

At the end of the programme, you’ll submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research on a related topic of your choice, which allows you to demonstrate and apply the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Social Policy) 60 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Understanding Society and Culture 30 credits

Optional modules

  • China's Development 15 credits
  • Environmental Assessment 15 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Human Resource Management: An International Perspective 15 credits
  • Managing Change 15 credits
  • Understanding and Managing Effective Groups and Teams 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Management of Finance for Health 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Standards and Tools for Business, Environment and Corporate Social Responsibility 15 credits
  • Climate Change Mitigation 15 credits
  • System Dynamics: Modelling Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Public Policy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, workshops, tutorials and lectures. Optional modules may also use other methods such as online learning. However, independent study is crucial to this degree – it allows you to prepare for taught sessions, develop your research interests and build a range of skills.

Assessment

Your core modules will be assessed using essays. Optional modules may use other forms of assessment that reflect the diversity of the topics you can study, including presentations, book and literature reviews, research proposals and reports among others.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a wide range of knowledge and skills throughout this programme, including sophisticated skills in research, communication and analysis that will be useful in a variety of careers.

Social and Public Policy graduates have gone on to a wide range of posts across the third-sector public services, government and business. These have included central and local government departments, community bodies, housing and health organisations, research consultancies and advocacy or campaigning.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice. Read more

This exciting programme explores disability as an equal opportunities issue by focusing on contemporary organisations and institutionalised practice.

If you’re a service provider, practitioner or policy maker who wants to bring theory and practice together, or you’re planning a career in the field of disability, you’ll explore a range of disability-related issues from theoretical and practical perspectives.

Our refreshed core modules allow you to explore the frontiers of research in this rapidly developing field, and focus on social policy for disabled people in education, benefits, housing, transport, employment, health and social support services, as well as recent developments in social research on disability. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on the topics that best suit your own interests or career plans, from care to disability and development via research training or race and ethnicity studies.

Research insight

Taught by academics from the Centre for Disability Studies, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment where tutors’ teaching is informed by their own cutting-edge research.

The interdisciplinary Centre for Disability Studies is at the forefront of international research in the field, using social model approaches that recognise disability as a form of institutional discrimination and social exclusion, rather than a product of physical difference between individuals. You’ll benefit from the expertise of researchers from diverse backgrounds, drawing on the experiences and issues raised by the disabled people’s movement.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll take a core module examining recent debates and developments in social research on disability. You’ll critically assess positivist, interpretative and ‘emancipatory’ methodologies and the data collection and analysis strategies that come with them, and consider the emergence of the ‘social model’ of disability.

You’ll apply these perspectives to contemporary social policy in Semester 2, as you explore topics such as disability benefits, self-help, public amenities like housing, transport and public buildings, education, employment and social support services.

In addition, you’ll gain specialist knowledge when you select from a range of optional modules. You could pursue further training in quantitative and qualitative research methods, or study topics such as special educational needs. You’ll also focus on a specific topic when you complete your dissertation – an individual piece of research that allows you to showcase the knowledge and skills you’ve gained.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Social Policy, Politics and Disabled People 30 credits
  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Disability) 60 credits
  • Debates on Disability Theory and Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Educational Needs: Inclusive Curriculum 30 credits
  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Disability and Development 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Social Policy Analysis 15 credits
  • Social Policy Debates 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Disability Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use various teaching methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials in core modules. Optional modules may also include methods such as practical classes, workshops or online learning. Independent study is also crucial to this programme, allowing you to shape your own research questions, prepare for taught sessions and build research and analytical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods are likely to vary, depending on the optional modules you choose. Most of our taught modules are assessed through written work such as essays and book and literature reviews.

Career opportunities

There is a growing demand for students with a comprehensive knowledge of disability issues in all areas of social life.

In particular, there are many career opportunities in health and social support services, education, human resources, statutory and voluntary agencies, NGOs (non-governmental organisations), INGOs (international non-governmental agencies) and charities.

There are also excellent career openings in social research and universities – you’ll be well prepared for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
MA Design Future Society is an 18-month programme, leading to a joint award with Mannheim University of Applied Sciences. The programme includes study at both universities. Read more

MA Design Future Society is an 18-month programme, leading to a joint award with Mannheim University of Applied Sciences. The programme includes study at both universities. If you start the programme at Leeds your first semester will be at Leeds, your second semester will be at Mannheim and then you will return to Leeds for your third semester.

All students registered on the programme may apply for Erasmus+ funding which will contribute to travel and living expenses during the five month exchange. The School of Design and Leeds University’s International Office and Language Centre will provide support for applications for funding, visas and pre-sessional language tuition.

This future orientated programme provides opportunities to integrate research from philosophy, social science and digital technology with design thinking in addressing social issues; realigning design as a discipline with social and cultural value. You will be encouraged to employ design as a catalyst for change; articulating new perceptions, developing appropriate strategies and implementing future-oriented solutions, which affect our society, culture and economy.

Traditionally designers applied their skills post problem identification – we will address that imbalance by positioning the designer at the point of problem identification and need analysis, extending the function and purpose of design beyond fulfilling commercial objectives by developing new and relevant products and implementing sustainable solutions for public, private and third sectors. This unique educational experience embraces collaboration, teamwork and internationalism and we encourage applications from all disciplines.

At the School of Design and Fakultät für Gestaltung, Mannheim University of Applied Sciences you will be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There are computer-aided design (CAD) suites with access to the latest design software and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing and laser cutting facilities, and colour analysis/prediction labs, eye-tracking technology and digital photography.

At Leeds there is also an impressive range of resources you can use for research. We house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history, offering a fascinating insight into the changing nature of our culture over time.

Course content

Fundamentally multi-disciplinary and collaborative, course content encourages innovation and autonomy in response to set briefs and self initiated study supported by expertise in research, strategic thinking and practical implementation of communication design. Traditional academic study in the form of essays, literature reviews and reports, combines with social projects requiring, empathy, team working, concept realisation and execution. Students are required to provide evidence of effective decision-making, objective self-reflection and critical evaluation through visual and oral presentations, critiques, reflective logs and reports, visual diaries, poster presentations and portfolio development.

In the first semester students undertake theoretical and practical study in integrated media, semiotics, philosophy, sociology and research methodology in order to identify and manage complex social issues and communicate insights and design proposals by effectively employing advocacy skills and presentation techniques. Team work and collaboration are essential to the successful generation and implementation of creative solutions, therefore students are required, within this context, to demonstrate independent judgement, decision-making and personal responsibility.

In Semester 2 there is a five-month exchange programme to Mannheim which involves the application of design thinking within a different cultural environment through independent and group social projects; presenting significant challenges in comprehension, interpretation, empathy and communication. Students are encouraged to develop entrepreneurial attitudes in seeking opportunities for collaboration; contributing to professional development by operating in new areas of influence and articulating complex information into a coherent creative proposal.

In the third semester you will return from Mannheim and the programme concludes with a major research dissertation or innovation project, independently conceived and managed, demonstrating abilities in research, holistic understanding and applying contemporary knowledge to solving future problems. The knowledge, skills and qualities acquired through this postgraduate programme are transferable for employment in a variety of sectors.

Course Structure

Year one compulsory modules

  • Integrated Communication (Design Future Society) 15 credits
  • Social Aesthetics 15 credits
  • Design and Society 15 credits
  • Research Methodology 15 credits
  • Social Design Projects 30 credits
  • Design Futures 30 credits

Year two optional modules

  • Dissertation - Digital Social and Mobile Design 60 credits
  • Digital Innovation Project 60 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Design Future Society MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, creative and technical workshops, creative studio sessions, group learning, group critiques and peer assessment. There will be an emphasis on social and situated learning where dialogue, reflection, intuition, critical analysis and judgement are exercised within the context of group learning and group assignments, supported by utilising social media networks and content sharing to connect students from both institutions.

By employing social media and digital technology we aim to develop a user-centric information infrastructure and self-organisational system of information sharing in order to encourage the following:

  • Participation, through focused discussion/conversation
  • Responsible, self motivated, intrinsically motivated thesis to demonstrate understanding
  • Exploration, by identifying relevant questions and autonomy in decision-making
  • Experimentation, acknowledging risk, failure, evaluation and reflection
  • Understanding, through action, experiential engagement, observation and analysis

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed by a variety of methods. Your own creative work will be assessed via portfolios and projects, reports, presentations and literature reviews. Formal examinations do not contribute to assessment. Full details of assessment for each module can be found via the programme catalogue.

Career opportunities

Employment opportunities are broad and varied as there is growing demand for communication professionals with social enterprise skills in design and innovation with a clear focus on social and cultural interaction and collaboration. Therefore employment prospects extend beyond the traditional agency model into research, strategy and planning roles within a broad range of companies and organisations. In addition graduates could also consider academic research and take advantage of the significant number of calls for research proposals that currently identify social need.

Placement opportunities

5 month Erasmus+ funded exchange at Mannheim University of Applied Sciences.





Read less
Gender Studies is an exciting area of research, exploring gender relations in the past, present and future. This programme draws on a variety of perspectives to analyse social and cultural phenomena through the lens of gender. Read more

Gender Studies is an exciting area of research, exploring gender relations in the past, present and future. This programme draws on a variety of perspectives to analyse social and cultural phenomena through the lens of gender.

Supported by our Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies, you’ll be able to explore approaches from across a range of academic disciplines. You’ll learn the principles of conducting research on gender and examine issues that both shape and are shaped by gender relations, such as family roles, reproductive technologies, citizenship, sexuality and culture.

Core modules in gender theory and research will lay these foundations, and you’ll build on them by choosing from a range of options on topics such as gender and development, care, gender equality in the workplace, race and sexuality. There has never been a more exciting time to study gender, and this programme will give you an insight into this vital and fascinating field.

Research insight

The Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies at the University of Leeds is at the forefront of gender research, working closely with other research centres within the School and maintaining strong links with universities around the world. It’s a welcoming and stimulating environment in which to explore gender issues from a range of perspectives. 

Course content

Core modules in your first semester will introduce you to research and different theoretical approaches in gender studies.

You’ll consider feminist research practices, including ethical and epistemological issues. At the same time, you’ll engage with contemporary theoretical approaches to analyse different – and sometimes contradictory – explanations for the source and operation of gender, and how it affects different areas of social life.

These modules lay the foundations of the programme, supporting your learning as you choose from optional modules to focus on specific topics.

This programme will give you strong research skills as well as a broad base of knowledge. You’ll put these into practice when you complete a dissertation on a topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme in September.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Researching Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Theorising Gender 1 30 credits
  • Theorising Gender 2 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Gender) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 15 credits
  • Contested Bodies 15 credits
  • Que(e)rying Sexualities 15 credits
  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Policy and Programme Evaluation 15 credits
  • Power, Critique & Global Transformations 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Gender Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Gender Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, tutorials and lectures, depending on your choice of optional modules. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to develop your skills and form your own ideas.

Assessment

Assessment methods may vary, depending on the modules you choose. They could include presentations, book reviews, research proposals and essays. We offer plenty of support including feedback on essay plans and draft dissertation chapters and regular opportunities to meet with academic staff on a one-to-one basis.

Career opportunities

This degree programme equips students with transferable skills such as research, analysis and communication, as well as a range of subject-specific knowledge and skills.

Graduates have gone on to further study, or into careers in teaching, policy forums, NGOs, campaigning and activism, and local, national and international agencies.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



Read less
This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development. Read more

This programme examines political, economic, and socio-cultural transformations in the Global South and interrogates the dynamics, challenges and opportunities confronting its societies – with a focus on gender issues in development.

You’ll learn about the experiences and viewpoints of people and nations of the Global South regarding development issues, as well as the inter-relationships between global, national and local actors in contested strategies for development.

You’ll also review strategies, programmes and policies in development, including organisations and donors promoting development, and assess the progress made by different development actors towards key international development goals.

You’ll explore controversies at the centre of contemporary development challenges and analyse both the theories and realities of development, to understand the different approaches, practices and discourses involved.

Research insight

MA Global Development has a close working relationship with the Global Development and Justice research group that aims to examine central debates within the field of global development from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The Global Development and Justice research group is also actively involved, amongst others, in the Centre for Global Development, a university-wide network that promotes cross-disciplinary approaches to the field, as well as the Leeds Centre for African Studies.

Course content

Core modules examine key issues surrounding global development, such as markets, inequality, democratisation, gender, health, education, human rights, conflict, violence and crime. You’ll also learn about various aspects of development practice, like the theoretical and analytical principles of Project Cycle Management. Additionally, you’ll hone your research and writing skills and then showcase them in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on a topic of your choice.

These modules will equip you to analyse, understand and discuss the major changes, problems and opportunities facing societies and people in the Global South. You’ll study some of the broader social, political, and economic causes of the problems, and the achievements and setbacks that people have experienced in their efforts to tackle them at the global, national and local levels and improve their societies and lives. You’ll learn to analyse, understand, and discuss development in the Global South in the 2010s in all its dynamism, complexity and significance.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you, including natural resources struggles, global health, gender and globalisation, education, international political economy or issues related to Africa and China.

If you are a part-time student, you can choose how to spread your studies across two years. However, we recommend that you at least take your compulsory modules in your first year, and you have to take the compulsory dissertation module in your second year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Gender, Globalisation and Development 30 credits
  • Global Inequalities and Development 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Africa in the Contemporary World 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Education in Development 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Development Management Techniques 15 credits
  • Research Methodology for Development 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Global Development and Gender MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Modules are conducted through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops. Tutors also provide you with individual advice on written work and you should begin to develop expertise in improving your work through face to face discussion with your tutors, formative assessment and through detailed feedback. You’ll be expected to carry out a good deal of independent, detailed and considered study.

All part-time students attend exactly the same classes as full-time students which usually take place between 9am and 5pm; there are no evening classes.

Assessment

Each module is assessed separately, through assessments that range from long essays to projects and assignments, offering you the opportunity to work in your particular field of interest within each topic area. You will also carry out a dissertation into a research area of your choice.

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at students who would like to pursue either a professional career or further research in international development and related fields, and generally have a desire to put their education into practice in the Global South.

You’ll gain a wide range of professional skills on top of your subject knowledge. You’ll have an understanding of project design and management in a development context, as well as being able to analyse quantitative and qualitative data. You’ll be able to construct clear arguments, critically assess different options for action, analyse policy documents, write research reports and give presentations. You’ll also be trained to make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations.

Our programme equips you for various career paths. Compatible careers include working in international development agencies, international organisations, governments, politics, NGOs, research organisations, policy making, companies, media, and academia.

Graduates have gone on to work in, for instance, non-governmental organisations in the UK or overseas, research and consultancy firms, international organisations (such as the UN), the Civil Service, the media, or have continued with further study (e.g. PhD research).

We encourage you to seek practical work experience in the international development field, and advise you on how to go about it.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities. Read more

This programme takes a philosophical, theoretical and historical approach to cultural studies, exploring the work of cultural criticism, reception and production through new critical perspectives, interdisciplinary insights and a vast spectrum of applications and opportunities.

We study the major traditions of cultural theory, including semiology, deconstruction, feminism, psychoanalysis, and Frankfurt School theories of the aesthetic, the media and technology. This training enables you to shape your thinking critically and develop your interests in a rigorously analytical context.

These theoretical and historical perspectives allow us to tease out the critical charge embedded in the notion of culture itself, and the transformative potential of creative and critical work in the arts and humanities.

Close reading and textuality are at the heart of the course, encouraging you to think critically about issues of modernity and postmodernity, the postcolonial, subjectivity and sexuality.

Diverse and dynamic

Founded in 1987 (as MA Cultural Studies), and situated in the School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, this programme appeals to students from across the humanities who are interested in a broad range of objects and genres including literature, film and the visual arts, performance, music, and philosophy.

You’ll work alongside students in different creative and critical disciplines and benefit from the diverse research interests of our tutors. It’s a dynamic environment where you’ll gain valuable knowledge and skills in a city with a vibrant cultural life.

Leeds University Library is one of the major academic research libraries in the UK with extensive print, online and manuscript collections. The University Library offers a comprehensive training programme to help you make the most of them. The School houses Parallax, published by Taylor and Francis, an internationally distributed journal of cultural theory and analysis.

Course content

The two modules that sit at the heart of this course will develop your understanding of cultural theory over time.

A core module in Cultural Theory offers an introduction to key paradigms, focusing on theories of the commodity, language, discourse, subjectivity and sexuality.

The second core module, Cultural History, explores the genealogies of contemporary theory in relation to a longer tradition of cultural criticism that emerged, with modernity itself, in the 18th century. Emphasis is given to practices of close reading, the question of textuality and the case study.

You will develop an understanding of the ideas of ‘commodity’ and commodity fetish’ that are central to the study of consumer culture, as well as issues around language, sign and discourse and subjectivity. You will put this into the context of the development of cultural studies, focusing on thinkers from Rousseau to Kant and Homi Bhabha. You will use film and other texts to explore these ideas.

In each semester, you will also have the chance to specialise when you choose from a range of optional modules.

We provide an integrated course of training in advanced level research. The skills you will develop, combined with the specialist knowledge built through your optional modules, will ultimately be focused in your dissertation ― an independent and self-devised research project, which you will undertake with the guidance of your supervisor. In Semester 2, you will present some of your own research at the annual MA Symposium.

If you choose to study part-time, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Cultural Theory 30 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Cultural History 30 credits
  • Cultural Studies: Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • Aesthetics and Politics 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • The Origins of Postcolonial England 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Cultural Theory MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Cultural Theory MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

To help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, we use a range of teaching and learning methods. These include seminars, film screenings, lectures, online learning and tutorials. Independent study is also a crucial component, allowing you to form your own ideas and develop your research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods will vary depending on the modules you choose. However, among others they may include essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations, poster presentations and portfolio or e-portfolio work.

Career opportunities

This programme will develop your critical and cultural awareness and expand your subject knowledge in theories and histories of culture. In addition, it will equip you with sophisticated research, analytical, critical and communication skills that will put you in a good position to succeed in a variety of careers.

Many of our graduates have also continued with their research at PhD level and secured external funding to support them – including AHRC scholarships. A large proportion of our former research students are now developing academic careers in the UK, Europe, Asia, USA and Australia.

Some have taken up posts working as curators and education staff in museums and galleries, as well as in journalism, publishing, arts marketing, public relations, university administration and teaching.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Delivered by leading academics from the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies in one of the best law schools in the UK, the Criminal Justice and Criminology MA offers you the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge and skills in relation to the regulation of crime in the UK, Europe and across the globe. Read more
Delivered by leading academics from the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies in one of the best law schools in the UK, the Criminal Justice and Criminology MA offers you the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge and skills in relation to the regulation of crime in the UK, Europe and across the globe.

The programme combines advanced study of criminal justice processes and criminological theory so you can develop an in-depth understanding of the nature, purposes, dynamic processes and outcomes of the criminal justice process.

Throughout the course we’ll encourage you to:

explore the criminal justice process
investigate contemporary policy debates and perspectives in crime control
consider how policy debates inform the politics of crime control
develop your research skills.

Read less
This degree allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors. Read more

This degree allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors.

You’ll learn about the ethical issues that arise across medicine and healthcare practice, but you’ll also have the opportunity to specialise in areas that interest you or suit your career aspirations. You’ll take modules on topics such as ethical issues at the beginning and end of life, autonomy and psychiatry, professional issues and allocating medical resources fairly, and focus on a topic of your choice to complete an independent dissertation.

We’re constantly developing the course and consulting with professionals working in the field, so our courses are informed by the most recent developments in practice. But you’ll be taught by active researchers with expertise in teaching ethics across medical disciplines, giving you the chance to engage with the latest academic arguments and debates.

The programme is designed for people who’ve never studied ethics or medical ethics, although we do also have applicants who have studied philosophy before. If you’re interested in thinking about key ethical issues in a reasoned and independent way, you’ll be able to explore big questions in the biomedical and healthcare spheres with the support of the Interdisciplinary Ethics Applied Centre (IDEA).

This course is also available to study part-time and/or online. You could also choose to study for a PGDip qualification, where you’ll study fewer modules overall.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Reason, Virtues and Obligation 15 credits
  • Conscience, Codes and Professional Issues 15 credits
  • Autonomy, Rationality and Psychiatric Issues 15 credits
  • Distributive Justice and Scarce Medical Resources 15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics 30 credits
  • Health Care Ethics: Dissertation 60 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life 15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biomedical and Healthcare Ethics MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biomedical and Healthcare Ethics MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Taught modules are structured around weekly group seminars led by one of our tutors. Overall, each taught module normally involves about four hours per week of contact time. In some modules you may also take part in group project work. However, independent study is also a vital element of this degree, allowing you to improve your research and analytical skills and gain more varied perspectives on key issues.

Assessment

Essays are our most common form of assessment – usually of around 3,000 words. However, in some modules we may also use presentations or other methods to assess your progress.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in biomedical and healthcare ethics can improve your confidence in handling workplace decisions that have ethical implications. It will also allow you to improve your transferable skills such as research, analysis and oral and written communication.

Many of our graduates continue with their research, whether in academic appointments at universities, PhD studies or as researchers for other organisations such as the King’s Fund. Others have gone into healthcare management, joined research or clinical ethics committees or gone on to teach medical or healthcare ethics at medical schools part-time.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X