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Sociology×

Bangor University, Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology

We have 7 Bangor University, Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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This is a one year programme, undertaken entirely by research on a topic proposed by the candidate and approved by the University. Read more
This is a one year programme, undertaken entirely by research on a topic proposed by the candidate and approved by the University. A supervisor will be appointed who will provide formal research supervision to the candidate for the 12 month period. At the end of the period, students will be expected to present a piece of work approximately 40,000–50,000 words in length.

There are four methods of doing the programme either pursuing full-time study at the University; pursuing full-time research at an external place of employment or either of these pathways on a part-time basis over a period of 24 months instead of the full-time 12 month period.

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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**This course is only available through the medium of Welsh**. Mae nifer y cymunedau a’r gweithleoedd dwyieithog ac amlieithog ar gynnydd, a chynllunio ieithyddol yn faes o bwysigrwydd cynyddol. Read more
**This course is only available through the medium of Welsh**

Mae nifer y cymunedau a’r gweithleoedd dwyieithog ac amlieithog ar gynnydd, a chynllunio ieithyddol yn faes o bwysigrwydd cynyddol. O’r herwydd, ceir mwyfwy o alw am unigolion sydd â’r wybodaeth a’r sgiliau angenrheidiol i lunio strategaethau a systemau effeithiol sy’n hyrwyddo cydraddoldeb ieithyddol. Wrth i ystyriaethau ieithyddol ddod yn flaenoriaeth ar gyfer llawer o feysydd - datblygu, cynllunio, addysg, iechyd, TG, marchnata - mae angen i staff mewn amrywiaeth eang o feysydd ddatblygu dealltwriaeth a sgiliau ym maes cynllunio ieithyddol. Ar ben hynny, mae cyhoeddi Mesur y Gymraeg (Cymru) (2011) wedi newid y fframwaith cyfreithiol ynghylch defnyddio'r Gymraeg ac felly’n golygu galw cynyddol fyth am weithlu dwyieithog, amryddawn.

Mae’r MA mewn Polisi a Chynllunio Iaith yn archwilio, mewn modd arloesol a chynhwysfawr, faes sy’n dod yn fwyfwy pwysig yng Nghymru a’r tu hwnt. Mae’r rhaglen yn elwa o arbenigedd amrywiol ysgolion Prifysgol Bangor ym meysydd Gwyddorau Cymdeithas, Ieithyddiaeth, Y Gyfraith, Busnes, Y Gymraeg, a Gwyddorau Iechyd a fydd yn rhoi i fyfyrwyr ddealltwriaeth o’r cwestiynau theoretig yng nghyswllt Cynllunio Iaith, yn ogystal â’r cwestiynau cymhwysol hollbwysig.

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The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

Read less
The structure of the programme will be as follows. Part I. Taught Courses. The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. Read more
The structure of the programme will be as follows:

Part I: Taught Courses
The MA Criminology and Law, which is run by Bangor School of Social Sciences and Bangor Law School, will provide students with postgraduate level knowledge and skills in the interdisciplinary area of criminology and law. It builds on criminological and legal skills and knowledge so as to provide specialist training in criminological, criminal justice and legal research. The programme enables students to develop an international perspective on crime, justice and law through national and cross-national approaches and case studies of other societies, and/or ‘cutting edge’ issues in contemporary criminology and law. Students will also acquire a wide range of transferable skills.

Employment opportunities
Graduates will be sought after by law-enforcement agencies such as the police. Other employment opportunities include public administration: e.g. crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, and international institutions. Political associations and NGOs are also possible employers. Graduates may take up work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice and law broadly conceived. Jobs are also available in research at universities and other research institutions. Of course, students may progress into further postgraduate study leading to a PhD.

Structure
Part 1: Taught Courses

Modules in Criminology and Law are taught in two semesters between September and May. Of these modules, half will be law based and taught in the Law School and half will be criminology based and taught in the School of Social Sciences. Modules together give 60 credits for Law and 60 for Criminology.

For this MA, Bangor Law School will offer a ground breaking course Forensic Linguistics in Court, which will examine the use of language in the criminal process. Training in Legal Research will include working with databases such as LexisNexis or Westlaw. Topics in International Criminal Law include international criminal courts and the offences they deal with. In the School of Social Sciences issues such as sentencing policy, theories of deviance, victimisation, international terrorism, the operation of the penal system and theories of policing and law enforcement can be studied both from a UK and international perspective. Teaching is mainly seminar based and allows for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Part 2: Dissertation

Students will write a 20,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice from within the broad remit of Criminology. Any topic can be suggested that is of interest for students and dissertation tutors.

Compulsory Modules:

International Case Studies in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Legal Research
Forensic Linguistics in Court
International Criminal Law
Dissertation on any topic within Criminology

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