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Full Time MA Degrees in Sheffield, United Kingdom

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

An English Literature masters from Sheffield is the mark of an independent thinker, a skilled researcher, someone who can bring complex projects to fruition. Our graduates go into teaching, management and consultancy, advertising, journalism, publishing, and all branches of the arts – especially theatre, film, and creative writing. Our courses are also excellent preparation for a PhD.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Modules

Memory and Narrative in Contemporary Literature; Exchanging Letters: art and Correspondence in twentieth-century American culture; Tales of the City; Analysis of Film; White Like Me; Rocket-State Cosmology.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Reconsidering the Renaissance.

Examples of optional modules – literature

Modules may include: Early Modern Paleography (i.e. training in reading sixteenth and seventeenth-century manuscripts); The English Civil War; The Country House; Directed Reading: Early Modern Books; Pastoral Literature (online module) and Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists (online module).

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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You’ll develop skills in textual and theoretical interrogation of narrative film, in both popular and art cinema. Close textual analysis of the moving image is supplemented by a range of optional national cinema studies, including Australian cinema and British visual culture. Read more

About the course

You’ll develop skills in textual and theoretical interrogation of narrative film, in both popular and art cinema. Close textual analysis of the moving image is supplemented by a range of optional national cinema studies, including Australian cinema and British visual culture. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Examples of optional modules

Modules may include: Analysis of Film; Approaches to the American Gothic (spring semester); Postwar British Drama, Film and Television.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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This module brings literature and linguistics together. Through a series of interdisciplinary modules, you’ll explore the language of literature. Read more

About the course

This module brings literature and linguistics together. Through a series of interdisciplinary modules, you’ll explore the language of literature. Subjects include: stylistics, cognitive poetics, postcolonial language and literatures, and the history of literary and linguistic thought.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core modules

Literary Language: narrative and cognition; Literary Language: history and culture.

Examples of optional modules

May include: Literature and Language in the Workplace; Exchanging Letters; Contemporary Poetry; Memory and Narrative; Languages of the British Isles.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Our MA in Aegean Archaeology offers a series of specialist modules on the archaeology of the Aegean and neighbouring regions, situated within a sophisticated and intellectually demanding theoretical context. Read more

About the course

Our MA in Aegean Archaeology offers a series of specialist modules on the archaeology of the Aegean and neighbouring regions, situated within a sophisticated and intellectually demanding theoretical context. We encourage a diachronic perspective and broad range of approaches and throughout the programme we will encourage and support you in the development of intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem-solving and independent judgement.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Current Issues in Aegean Prehistory
Reinventing Archaeology
Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation
Dissertation

Indicative optional modules

Mediterranean Landscapes
Rethinking the Ancient Economy
Experimental Archaeology
The Archaeology of Cyprus
Introduction to Human Osteology
Ethnography in Archaeology: Materialising Culture: Agents, Things and Social Processes
Reconstructing Ancient Technologies: Ceramics
Archaeobotany
Archaeozoology

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University of Sheffield Department of History
Distance from Sheffield: 0 miles
Contemporary politics shows that there is more need than ever for critical understanding of the formative political, social, economic and intellectual trends in American history. Read more

About the course

Contemporary politics shows that there is more need than ever for critical understanding of the formative political, social, economic and intellectual trends in American history. This MA allows you to study the historical development of the United States from the first encounter between Europeans and Native Americans in the colonial period through to the end of the Cold War.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Approaches to the American Past; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Another Country: America and the Problem of Decolonisation; City Life in Jacksonian America, 1828-1850; Burying the White Gods: Indigenous People in the Early Modern Colonial World; A People’s Conflict: The Union and the US Civil War; Eighteenth-century British American Colonies.

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On this course you will experience a broad range of skills and techniques relating to a range of different areas within the animation and digital effects industries before choosing a specific area to specialise in. Read more
On this course you will experience a broad range of skills and techniques relating to a range of different areas within the animation and digital effects industries before choosing a specific area to specialise in. You then develop your skills and knowledge in that chosen area to become a multi-talented animation and digital effects artist.

You are supported in the production of creatively driven work to a professional standard and encouraged to challenge boundaries and think in original ways. You develop intellectual and critical approaches to creative tasks and production processes in animation and digital effects. The course provides an environment where you are enabled to work flexibly and independently within the diverse media industries.

We have up-to-date industry standard animation and digital compositing software and facilities allowing you to build your professional skill set throughout the course. You develop practical and conceptual skills in animation production through real world scenarios. You make and complete animations and digital effects to a high professional standard and develop a portfolio of work that showcases your skills to future employers.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-animation-and-digital-effects

Course structure

Full time – 13 months. Part time – 2-3 years. Starts September.

Postgraduate Certificate modules
-3D fundamentals
-Acquisition and digital effects 1
-Observational drawing
-Character animation

Postgraduate Diploma core modules
-Advanced animation techniques
-Acquisition and digital effects 2
-Communicating research
Postgraduate Diploma electives (choose from either)
-Concept art
-Asset creation

Masters modules
-Masters animation project

Assessment: coursework; dissertation.

Other admission requirements

Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.

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Sheffield Hallam University Sheffield Business School
Distance from Sheffield: 0 miles
This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more
This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to:
-Develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice.
-Develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice.
-Engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology.
-Complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights.
-Learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations.

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including:
-Gender violence.
-Children as soldiers.
-Radicalisation and counter-terrorism.
-Deaths in custody.
-Refugees and asylum seekers.
-Global security.
-Torture.
-Poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime.

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-applied-human-rights

Course structure

Full time – 1 year. Part time – 2 years. Starts September.

Modules
-Human rights in the 21st century
-Advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
-Principles of human rights and social justice
-Researching human rights
-Project management for human rights
-Dissertation

Assessment: essays, reports, case studies, dissertation.

Other admission requirements

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS 6.5 score with a minimum of 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other skill areas or equivalent. If your English language skill is currently below IELTS 6.5 we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English score.

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On this course, you will consider fundamental questions about humanity and the processes that brought about significant changes in human history. Read more

About the course

On this course, you will consider fundamental questions about humanity and the processes that brought about significant changes in human history. You will develop skills to critically evaluate sources of information and work between the theoretical and practical demands of the discipline.

This programme allows you flexibility to choose from our entire portfolio of modules. If your first degree is in another subject, this is an excellent conversion course, preparing you for specialised research at PhD level.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation or Fieldwork Placement.

Indicative optional modules

Choose modules to the value of 75 credits from those specified. The majority of our modules are 15 credits.

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This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. Read more

About the course

This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. It creates a strong platform for future doctoral research combining these approaches. You can specialise in early history (classical antiquity) or later prehistory (Late Bronze Age-Early Iron Age), but a diachronic perspective and broad range of approaches are encouraged.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Greeks, Romans and ‘Others’ in the Ancient World; Rethinking the Ancient Economy; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Current Issues in Aegean Prehistory; Mediterranean Landscapes; Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practise; Roman Italy and its Hinterland; The Archaeology of Cyprus; Funerary Archaeology; Archaeobotany; Advanced Archaeobotany; Archaeozoology; A module from the Department of History; Enhanced Languages Project (Modern Language Teaching).

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University of Sheffield School of Architecture
Distance from Sheffield: 0 miles
This studio-based course will help you develop your own distinctive design practice. You’ll explore design processes and methodologies. Read more

About the course

This studio-based course will help you develop your own distinctive design practice. You’ll explore design processes and methodologies. There are opportunities to work on real-life projects with local and regional groups. You can take the course as a stand-alone MA or as preparation for a PhD via our PhD by Design programme.

Advance your career

Our graduates are architects, project managers, urban designers and client advisers.

Employers include the Olympic Park Legacy Company, Hawkins Brown, Renzo Piano Building Workshop and URBED (Urbanism, Environment and Design) Ltd. With a post-qualification degree, you could move on to a senior position or further academic research and teaching.

Learn from experts

You’ll be joining one of the largest and most diverse groups of full-time architecture academics in the country. Our staff come from the arts, physical and social sciences, and engineering. This connects our research to other disciplines and stimulates debate about the future of architecture.

Our international research projects shape policy and address public and professional needs. We integrate those projects with our teaching on courses that will develop your core skills. You’ll be encouraged to provide social and environmental solutions to the challenges of our time.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us fourth in the UK.

Explore your ideas

You’ll have access to a lot of specialist facilities. Our media unit has a range of audio-visual and environmental equipment including artificial sky for daylight simulation, a thermal imaging camera and a mixed reality imaging suite. We have our own photography studio, reprographics unit and 3D printers. There are design studios, research rooms and computer labs.

Our teaching is more than lectures and seminars. Our student-led design projects help you learn by doing. Working with real clients on real projects, you’ll discover the benefits of socially engaged design and collaborative working. The outcomes make
a difference to communities.

Code modules

Special Design 1 ‘Live Project’; Design Project 1 and 2; Reflections on Architectural Design; Thesis Design Project; Route A – Research by Design (Theory) Critical Spatial Theory; Route B – Research by Design (Practice) Theory and Research in Design, Environment and Technology in Design.

Examples of optional modules

Reflections on Architectural Education; Conservation and Regeneration Principles and Approaches; Conservation and Regeneration Traditional Materials and Techniques; Conservation and Regeneration Policy and Law; Participation in Urban Design and Architecture; History and Theory of Urban Design; Reflection on Urban Design Practice; Principles of Building Physics for Sustainable Design; Building Environmental Simulation and Analysis; Renewable Energy; Parametric Architectural Geometry; Critical Application of Building Information Modelling.

Teaching and assessment

Learning is through studio-based design work with individual and group tutorials, block seminars and workshops, traditional lecture modules, live projects involving real clients and real community projects. You’ll be assessed on course assignments and examinations, design thesis and a dissertation.

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After launching over 20 years ago to cater for students seeking the key skills to work in the cultural sector, many graduates from this course now work in high profile arts jobs all over the world. Read more
After launching over 20 years ago to cater for students seeking the key skills to work in the cultural sector, many graduates from this course now work in high profile arts jobs all over the world. Drawing on close working relationships with a host of partner organisations, including Museums Sheffield and the Cultural Industries Quarter Agency, this course combines a thorough grounding in cultural policy and theory with practical management skills.

With the creative economy continuing to out-perform other sectors in the UK and overseas, this course is ideal if you are:
-A cultural manager seeking a further qualification.
-A graduate from any area wanting to develop professional and vocational skills at postgraduate level.
-Working in a different sector and seeking to change your career path to cultural management.

We offer flexible September and January start dates and full-time and part-time study options. You are supported to secure voluntary work experience with a range of partner organisations including Sheffield Theatres, Sheffield Industrial Heritage Museums, Site Gallery and several festival producers.

UK and international students undertake modules covering the policy, strategy and management of cultural organisations. Key areas of study include:
-UK and international arts funding models.
-The impact of heritage and regeneration policies on regional and national identity.
-The benefits of arts engagement in education, health and prison settings.
-An investigation of how issues of diversity are played out in museums.

You have the opportunity to go on study visits to Glasgow, Liverpool, Leeds and Manchester, which are complemented by visiting lectures from a range of well-established sector professionals from the visual and performing arts, heritage and community arts sectors.

Our experienced staff offer guided support to our small cohort of students, many of who progress to PhD study after excelling on our research methods and dissertation modules.

Thanks to our impressive reputation among employers, our graduates have found employment with
-Arts Council England
-The Natural History Museum
-Hampton Court Palace
-Yorkshire Sculpture Park
-Baltic contemporary art gallery
-Manchester's Contact Theatre
-Guanfu Museum of Antiquities
-798 Artzone in Beijing

For further details, visit the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/ma-arts-and-cultural-management

Course structure

Full time – 1 year
Part time – typically 2 years
Starts September and January

Modules
-Cultural policy
-Management of cultural organisations
-Policy and Identity: heritage, museums and regeneration

Assessment
-By assignment, oral presentation and professional report plus dissertation for MA.

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University of Sheffield Department of Biblical Studies
Distance from Sheffield: 0 miles
This course will prepare you for further research at MPhil/PhD level. We’ll give you training in research methods, then you’ll work with your supervisor to formulate a research topic and complete a 12,000–15,000-word dissertation. Read more

About the course

This course will prepare you for further research at MPhil/PhD level. We’ll give you training in research methods, then you’ll work with your supervisor to formulate a research topic and complete a 12,000–15,000-word dissertation.

The rest of your coursework is up to you. You might choose to develop your language skills in Hebrew, Greek, French or German,
or you could focus more on the postcolonial and contemporary cultural aspects of biblical studies.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates go into a range of careers all over the world, including university lecturing, the creative industries and religious education. They work for a variety of organisations, from charities to museums and libraries.

The MA Biblical Studies Research is designed to be a good preparation for a PhD.

About us

This is one of the world’s leading institutes for multidisciplinary research on the Bible. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us among the UK top ten for quality output.

We take a dynamic, contemporary approach to the subject. Drawing on expertise from various disciplines including archaeology, history and social science and literature, we examine the Bible’s influence on culture, society and politics.

Our current research includes projects on biblical literacy, religion and conflict, embodied religion, the Bible and forced migration, and religion and rape culture.

Outstanding teaching

When you study with us, you tap into a huge amount of specialist expertise. As a masters student, you’ll be part of the culture of the department, giving presentations at research seminars and engaging with visiting researchers.

Funding

Studentships are available for Home students through the AHRC Research Preparation Masters Scheme. The deadline for applications is May 1. For details see:

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through interactive lectures, seminars and supervised research. You’ll be assessed on your coursework and a dissertation.

Core module

Research Methods in Biblical Studies.

Examples of optional modules

Options include: Issues in Cultural Studies; the Bible and Visual Culture; Issues in Religion, Theology and the Bible, and reading modules for which you can agree your own focus with the tutor to reflect your research interests.

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Specialise in Catalan Studies with the support of our expert and experienced staff. You’ll develop your existing skills in Hispanic Studies, modern languages or related disciplines. Read more

About the course

Specialise in Catalan Studies with the support of our expert and experienced staff. You’ll develop your existing skills in Hispanic Studies, modern languages or related disciplines. You’ll study the Catalan language and its cultural context.

There are modules on the literature, politics and history of Catalan culture. You’ll receive intermediate to advanced tuition in spoken and written Catalan; beginners language tuition is also available.

The course includes research training, supervised study on a specialised topic, and a dissertation. You can also choose optional tailor-made directed reading modules.

If you’re interested in the MA Catalan Studies, please contact us before you apply.

Our department

We’re very strong on Latin American literature, culture and society, contemporary Spanish culture and society and nineteenth-century Spanish literature – with a major research project on Pérez Galdós.

We specialise in Catalan studies, and the modern literature and culture of the Portuguese-speaking world. We also have expertise in contemporary Spanish politics and the novel, and Hispanic linguistics, language policy and planning.

Facilities and resources

We’re based in a new, specially designed building, with modern facilities for teaching and research. Our regular research seminars, conferences and study days give you the chance to keep up with innovative thinking and research.

You’ll have access to all the materials you’d expect from a major research university, including an extensive collection of Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan-language literature and films, newspapers and periodicals.

Core modules

Dissertation; Research Skills.

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Accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute. The largest and fastest-growing cities in the world are in low and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Read more

About the course

Accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute

The largest and fastest-growing cities in the world are in low and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. This new course explores the urban development and planning challenges faced by governments and people in these regions and provides you with the analytical and practical tools to address them.

The MA uses cutting-edge theories in both urban and development studies to engage with changes in the global south, including: the globalisation of production and consumption, rapid urbanisation, environmental change, and the spread
of new forms of governance.

Optional modules include a team-based student consultancy project for an external client in the field of international urban development. There’s also a field class in the global south.

The course is suitable for recent graduates and those with professional experience.

It’s excellent preparation for careers (or further research) in international development, urban governance, planning and environmental policy focused on the global south.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates work in planning, real estate and related professions with private sector planning and real estate consultants, local authorities, policy analysts and international development and design agencies.

How we rate

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) says we’re the best RTPI-accredited planning school in the UK. 85 per cent of our research is classed as ‘world-leading’ ‘internationally excellent’ with ‘outstanding impacts’.

How we teach

Nothing is more important to us than your career. We work closely with industry to make sure our courses are up-to-the-minute and relevant so you’ll learn the skills you need to make it to the top in your chosen profession.

You’ll go on site visits and and take part in exercises that simulate real global challenges. Past field trips have included trips to London, Seoul, Cairo and Istanbul. We also organise work placements with planning agencies.

There are lectures, seminars, computer workshops and tutorials. You’re assessed on your coursework and a dissertation.

Autumn semester

Core modules: Theorising the City in the Global South; Urban Development in the Global South; Ideas and Practice in International Development; Research Methods.

Spring semester

Core modules: Urban Design in the Global South; International Field Class.

Examples of optional modules

International Urban Development Consultancy Project; Sustainable Development: a critical perspective; Managing Cities: the Seoul case study ; Public Participation; Regional Policy and Governance.

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