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Psychology×

Brunel University London, Full Time MA Degrees in Psychology

  • Psychology×
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About the Course. How are our behaviours influenced by unconscious motives?. Which conflicts lie at the heart of contemporary individual and social problems?. Read more
About the Course

How are our behaviours influenced by unconscious motives?
Which conflicts lie at the heart of contemporary individual and social problems?
What explains our cultural and ideological obsession with power and violence?

This MA is designed to provide you with a training in classical and contemporary psychoanalytic theory. It maintains a constant attention to the relation between theory and practice and provides a clinical grounding through its emphasis on the clinical writings of Freud, Klein and Lacan.

The MA also offers the opportunity to develop a psychoanalytic approach to contemporary socio-cultural issues, in particular questions of political ideology, social conflict and violence. It engages with the relation between the psychoanalytic and social fields by exploring how to conceive of a psychoanalytic social theory. It questions how we can provide a specifically psychoanalytic account of social relations and it engages with issues raised by post-structuralist and feminist accounts of sexuality.
Aims

This degree is relevant to a wide range of graduates in the Social Sciences, Humanities and Fine Art, as well as those with professional interests in psychotherapy and analysis who wish to develop and apply their skills to the issues and areas on which this degree focuses.

Previous and current students have included art and film students, teachers and art historians as well as psychologists and analysts - and recently included a performance artist. Many overseas students have also undertaken this degree not only from most European countries but also from Latin America and farther afield.


Special Features

We have an international research reputation, with particular expertise in areas such as neuropsychology, psychoanalysis, developmental psychology and social psychology.

The Centre for Cognition and Neuroimaging jointly owns a 3-Tesla fMRI scanner dedicated to research, as part of the ‘CU BIC ’ collaboration with Royal Holloway, Roehampton and Surrey Universities.

Academics have published high-impact journal articles and books on a broad range of subjects and have received research funding from a variety of bodies, including the EU, the Commission for Racial Equality, the Nuffield Foundation, the Economic and Social Research Council, the Home Office, the Department of Health, The Wellcome Trust, The Leverhulme Trust and the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Professor Dany Nobus (degree convenor) specialises in the study of development and disorders of sexuality; history of psychology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis; psychology of transgression and eccentricity. Current research projects involve an exploration of the impact of individual choice on the development of sexual identity, and an investigation into the effect of changing representation of fatherhood in western society on parenting practices and socialisation strategies.

Dr Antonios Vadolas' research explores the relationship between fascism, power and the category of perversion. His current research interests include the death drive in politics and art; the link between language and the body; psychopathology and psychoanalysis.

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This MA is designed to provide you with a training in classical and contemporary psychoanalytic theory. It provides you with a clinical grounding through its emphasis on the clinical writings of Freud, Klein and Lacan. Read more
This MA is designed to provide you with a training in classical and contemporary psychoanalytic theory. It provides you with a clinical grounding through its emphasis on the clinical writings of Freud, Klein and Lacan. Classic case studies, contemporary cases and case presentations by practising analysts are central to this course.

The MA also offers the opportunity to develop a psychoanalytic approach to contemporary socio-cultural issues, in particular questions of political ideology, social conflict and violence. It engages with the relations between the psychoanalytic and social fields by exploring how to conceive of a psychoanalytic social theory. It questions how we can provide a specifically psychoanalytic account of social relations and it engages with issues raised by post-structuralist and feminist accounts of sexuality.

Who is this degree for? Previous and current students have included art and film students, teachers and art historians as well as psychologists and analysts, and recently a performance artist. Many overseas students have also undertaken this degree, not only from European countries but also from Latin America and further afield.

Course Content
Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School on whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing, modules are likely to be drawn from the following areas:
Foundations of Psychoanalytic Theory, Clinical Interventions in Psychoanalysis, Symptom and Society, Research Methods in Psychoanalysis. Check the web for the latest updates.

Recent dissertation topics include:
Psychoanalysis and Racial Identity - Exploring the Impasse; The Perverse Prostitute, the Neurotic Woman, the Stereotyped Female; Psychosis and the Image; On Nightmares

Assessment
Assessment is by coursework and a final dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Careers
Upon graduation you will be equipped to further develop your interests in psychoanalytic practice and in the study of contemporary social issues. Some students have gone on to teach and lecture in this area while others have become (Lacanian) analysts, or have taken other intensive analytic training courses. Several students have subsequently undertaken PhD degrees not only directly in psychoanalytic studies but also in art history. Others have used their degrees in different ways through careers in business and the commercial sector, or in youth work and management.

Here is what a few of our past students have to say:

Doreen:
“I have worked as a therapist and social worker in the fields of mental health, addiction, palliative care and end-of-life care for several years. I completed my undergraduate education as well as clinical training in counselling and psychotherapy in Toronto, Canada. During my training, psychoanalysis was a key component of the curriculum and it sparked my interest in pursuing further studies in this area. Choosing to study the MA in Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Society at Brunel was a prudent decision. It offered me the opportunity to deepen and expand my understanding in this area which has had a positive and progressive impact on my work with my patients and clients. My experience at Brunel has been further inspired by the support, patience and encouragement of its teaching and administrative staff. My career, as well as various other dimensions of my life, continue to be enriched as I begin my PhD research at Brunel."

Stephen: “Having worked as a clinical psychologist in an NHS adult mental health service for several years, I was keen to extend my knowledge and understanding of psychoanalysis. I chose Brunel because the MA course provided the opportunity to learn to think psychoanalytically and to apply psychoanalytic thinking across social and cultural contexts. The course was a delight, being both intellectually stimulating and enjoyable; it has helped to enrich my clinical work with patients and has enabled me to think constructively about the various group and organisational contexts in which I work as a psychologist. It also provided a psychoanalytic perspective on art, literature and film, and this has continued to contribute to my cultural understanding and enjoyment."

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