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Politics & Government×

Keele University, Full Time MA Degrees in Politics & Government

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This course offers an exciting opportunity to study human rights in the interdisciplinary context of law, politics and philosophy. Read more

Overview

This course offers an exciting opportunity to study human rights in the interdisciplinary context of law, politics and philosophy. The course content reflects that human rights is one of the key discourses of our times. The course is aimed both at people working in related fields (for example, professionals working in the fields of law, government and public sector, social services, human resource management, or human rights advocacy), and anyone else interested in further study in this area.

- The course is taught on a semesterised basis. Course content combines analysis of current human rights law and practices with a critical exploration of the structures, potential, and limits of law and legal reform, at the domestic, European, and international levels.

- The focus on ‘Globalisation and Justice’ emphasises the contemporary and interdisciplinary nature of the course. We do not aim at a simple endorsement of the discourse, but at a set of critical reflections that draw upon varied global and local human rights philosophies, policies and practice.

- Postgraduate students will find a range of support structures, including: research training; accessible staff supervisors; good library resources; access to postgraduate study rooms; and access to IT and legal research tools.

- This course builds on existing strengths of the Law School and SPIRE in research and teaching. Both Schools are committed to maintaining our teaching at the highest standard. Law and SPIRE are both highly regarded in their subject areas with international reputations for teaching and research. In the recent 2014 REF, Keele University stood out for its world-leading impact of research in Philosophy, Politics, and Law (with Philosophy and Politics both ranked first for Impact nationally). Keele hosts a wide range of seminars, workshops, lectures and visiting fellowships. Many of these activities are available without charge to Keele students. Both Schools are characterised by their energy and enthusiasm, as well as their friendliness and collegiality.

- Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has constantly been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

Internship Programme:
As part of our concern to develop our students' experience in the field of human rights, one of our founding course team members and longstanding members of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), Professor Patrick Thornberry will host students at the Committee's sessions in Geneva.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanrightsglobalisationandjustice/

Course Aims

- This Masters programme aims to enable students to develop strong practical and theoretical understandings of human rights law, politics and philosophy at domestic, regional and international levels.

- The course also aims to provide students with a set of critical reflections that draw upon the varied global and local social and political contexts in which human rights operates.

- The course aims to develop not only subject-specific knowledge and skills, but also transferable skills. In terms of the latter, particular attention is paid to research and analytical skills. The course also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level.

- Course content combines analysis of current human rights law and practices with a critical exploration of the structures, potential, and limits of law and legal reform at the domestic, European, and international levels.

Course Content

The programme consists of 3 core modules and 5 elective modules. Students taking the MA in Human Rights, Globalisation and Justice write 8 module essays and a dissertation of between 15,000-20,000 words.

The MA requires 180 credits, made up of taught modules (120 credits) and a 60-credit dissertation. The modules are taught between September and April, and the dissertation is submitted in the following September.

Students who prefer not to undertake a dissertation may conclude their studies with a Postgraduate Diploma, if they achieve 120 credits by taking 7-8 taught modules.

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment of taught modules is normally by means of coursework. This requires a written assignment of 2,000-3,000 words for each module. The pass mark is 50% and students must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation.

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

International

Keele Law School is known internationally for our outward-looking and distinctive law degrees delivered in a supportive and dynamic learning environment. Students at Keele Law School learn from leading, internationally recognised academics that come from all over the world. We work hard to ensure that our ever-expanding body of international students joining us from around the world are given every support to help them succeed while studying at Keele in order to achieve their aspirations as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons. We are committed to ensuring that your time at Keele Law School will be both successful and enjoyable.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Columbia, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, Turkey, France, Japan, Bangladesh, Israel, and Germany who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK

Special Features

Opportunity to apply for an Internship at the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UN CERD) in Geneva, Switzerland. Internships will be offered to 1-3 students, following an interview.

Support from a personal supervisor and tutors.

In campus accommodation.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Read more

Overview

Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Each of these challenges has political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions; each provides an opportunity to rethink longstanding debates and opens up new fields of political enquiry.

SPIRE’s Masters in Environmental Politics has run since 1996 and is taught by some of the most prominent figures in the field. The course is designed for people who wish to understand and analyse the wide range of political and policy questions thrown up by increasingly complicated environmental problems. It has attracted students from all over the UK, the EU and the world. The international mix of students and staff adds greatly to the nature of discussion and learning.

Keele University has an unrivalled reputation for its work in Environmental Politics, with internationally recognised experts in various fields of social science environmental research particularly in the fields of sociology, political theory, economics, international relations, environmental ethics and public policy. Our interdisciplinary approach, together with a large and active research community on environmental issues within Keele, contributes to a thriving intellectual culture of which you can expect to be a part as an Environmental Politics student.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/environmentalpolitics/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Environmental Politics is to provide you with an intensive period of study in which to learn about environmental politics and policy in a systematic and critical manner. It aims to provide you with a foundation in the theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenging, interdisciplinary field. In addition to your core modules for the MA/MRes, we recommend that you take our Dimensions of Environmental Politics module, which introduces five key fields of political inquiry in relation to the environment. It looks at: green political theory; the political sociology of the environment; the environment and public policy; environment and political economy; and international environmental politics. Your other chosen elective modules and your dissertation project give a broad scope in which to pursue specific environmental topics of your own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics (recommended)
• Environmental Diplomacy (recommended)
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy (recommended)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Read less
In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. Read more

Overview

In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. So one important way to understand international politics is to examine the practices of diplomats and the contexts within which they operate.

Keele's MA/MRes in Diplomatic Studies aims to meet this need. The first of its kind in the UK, it continues to provide a solid, advanced grounding in the legal foundations, and the theory and practice of diplomacy. Many students on the course are from diplomatic backgrounds, and so the course provides a useful link between the worlds of academia and of practical policy-making.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/diplomaticstudies/

Course Aims

The course aims to ground students in the central legal, theoretical and practical aspects of diplomacy. It does this within a context of a more general understanding of International Relations. It also prepares students for research – both research that they may do for their dissertation, but also research that they may undertake in their future academic or professional work. The optional modules and the dissertation give students a broad scope in which to pursue topics of their own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and international Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management Reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law (recommended)
• Diplomatic Practice (recommended)
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Background reading:
There is no single textbook for this course. Some of the basic texts include: R.P. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, G.R. Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, C.M. Constantinou, On the Way to Diplomacy, J. Der Derian, On Diplomacy, K. Hamilton and R. Langhore, The Practice of Diplomacy, H. Nicoslon, The Evolution of Diplomatic Method, E. Satow, Guide to Diplomatic Practice, and A. Watson, Diplomacy: The Dialogue Between States.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. Read more

Overview

As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. From a discipline which focused closely on a certain set of interactions between sovereign states, it has expanded greatly to encompass a much wider set of questions about the nature of international or global political structures and processes.

Correspondingly, a whole set of theoretical tools have also emerged to try to explain or interpret this newly expanded field

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationalrelations/

Course Aims

The course aims to provide you with an innovative grounding in the central theoretical and practical aspects of both the traditional and the expanded conceptions of International Relations. It also aims to equip you with the conceptual and analytical skills to think critically about the nature of global structures and processes. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management reform
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda (recommended)
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Read less
Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques. Read more

Overview

Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques.

This novel exciting course reflects the latest trends in security studies and is designed to provide students with the elements to become world-class global security analysts. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students and offers direct applications for policy-makers, risk professionals, and students seeking to pursue an academic path.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/globalsecurity/

Course Aims

This novel exciting programme reflects the latest trends in security studies, cutting-edge security research developed at Keele, and innovative and creative teaching methods. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students eager to develop their analytical skills on the breathtaking world of global security. The uniqueness of the programme lies on its creative approach to teaching and research designed to inspire critical thinking for the analysis of a complex world. Teaching is complemented by academic-trips intended to provide students with an opportunity to experience in situ security analysis. The overall objective of the programme is to help students to unleash their curiosity on learning and researching security.

This course aims to provide you with an up-to-date, advanced and critical introduction to the theory and politics of global security. In doing so it also seeks to promote and nurture the development of the complex analytical and conceptual skills that the study of this discipline requires. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The European Union and the Global Commons
• The Politics of Global Security (recommended)
• The Theory of Global Security (recommended)
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Read less
The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Read more

Overview

The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Arguably, nowhere are these developments more evident than in contemporary Europe.

On the one hand, European integration has undoubtedly challenged the role and powers of the nation state. While nation states remain in control of many aspects of domestic politics and policy, more and more policies are being shaped by decisions made at the European Union level. While these trends raise all sorts of questions about issues of sovereignty, democratic accountability, representation and efficiency, they also open up new opportunities for the nation states to cooperate more closely, and for the EU itself to develop further as a regional and global actor.

On the other hand, developments within nation states have challenged the ways political decisions are made and how citizens are linked with this decision-making. Traditional communities have become less cohesive, political loyalties have waned, and trust in democratic institutions has declined. At the same time, however, we have also witnessed the rise of new values, identities and actors. Together, these developments are putting pressure on longstanding patterns and processes of representation, political intermediation and decision-making and are challenging the traditional way of conducting politics.

This course is unique in the UK in that it examines developments within Europe through an interdisciplinary lens, combining political science and international relations perspectives with historical and cultural ones. This broad outlook is made possible by the range of expertise of the teaching staff at Keele and by SPIRE’s research strengths.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanpoliticsandculture/

Course Aims

The aims of this Masters course are to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to think critically about and develop an understanding of the political and cultural dynamics of contemporary Europe, viewed in a global, regional and national context.

In addition, the course aims to assist students in developing a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to their intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare students for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and non-governmental organizations, the European institutions, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management Reform
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

It is also possible to take a modern foreign language (other than English) as one of the optional modules. Language modules run over both semesters. Languages currently available are:

* French (beginners, intermediate, advanced, post A-level 1 or post A-level 2 level)
* German (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Spanish (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Japanese (beginners, intermediate or advanced level)
* Russian (beginners or intermediate level)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Read less
Climate change is as much a political issue as a scientific one, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Those able to understand and address the social, ethical and political challenges it poses will be highly valuable citizens and employees. Read more

Overview

Climate change is as much a political issue as a scientific one, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Those able to understand and address the social, ethical and political challenges it poses will be highly valuable citizens and employees.

This MA draws on both natural and social sciences to set these challenges in context. Core modules cover international agreements, national regulation and policymaking, NGO campaigns, and grassroots activism. Formal and informal responses to climate change are examined from economic, business, scientific, governmental, and civil society perspectives. Students develop an in-depth understanding of the complex relationships between climate politics and related areas of concern such as peak oil, resource depletion, biodiversity, gender, food sovereignty, and environmental security.

The course is hosted in the School of Politics, International Relations and the Environment (SPIRE) and primarily taught by members of the Centre for Environmental Action and Thought (CREATe), the UK’s pre-eminent cluster of environmental politics specialists. Additional expert input is drawn from other academic departments and from experts outside the University.

Keele’s large campus is undergoing a major redevelopment programme with sustainability at its heart. As a student on the MA in Climate Change Studies you will be able to see these exciting developments at first hand.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/climatechangestudies/

Course Aims

The aims of the course are to enable students to: Think, talk, and write about climate change, and the ways in which it is represented, in a systematic, critical and well-informed way. Understand, evaluate and apply a range of theories about the political consequences of climate change, and appreciate the theory and empirical reality of responses to climate change in their social and political contexts. Develop the ability to conduct and report on their own research using appropriate techniques of scholarship in the social sciences. These research skills are essential for the dissertation, but also give a good grounding for future academic or professional work.

Course Content

Completion of the MA requires 180 credits, obtained through four 30-credit modules and a 60-credit dissertation of 15,000 words. This degree is part of the overarching pathway structure for postgraduate environment degrees at Keele. Students will be eligible to undertake environment-related modules from both SPIRE and the School of Physical and Geographical Sciences.

SPIRE Modules include:
- Dimensions of Environmental Politics (Core)
- Environmental Diplomacy
- EU and the Global Commons
- Green Political Theory
- Environmental Decision-making in the UK
- US Environmental Politics and Policy
- Environmental Movements North and South

Dissertation:
15,000-word dissertation on any aspect of climate change politics, to be agreed with supervisory staff. Students may be able to undertake relevant fieldwork to research the work of an organisation working in the field of climate change.

Teaching & Assessment

Each module is assessed by a coursework essay plus a range of skills-training exercises. Students demonstrating an outstanding level of work will receive their degree with distinction.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry material, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Columbia, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK (see the ‘International Applicants’ button above).

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Like them or loathe them, political parties and elections are important. Elections constitute an essential element of modern democracy and defining moments for the distribution of political power. Read more

Overview

Like them or loathe them, political parties and elections are important. Elections constitute an essential element of modern democracy and defining moments for the distribution of political power. For their part, political parties help link politics and society, compete in elections and structure political processes within and between key political institutions. As Schattschneider famously observed in 1942, ‘Modern democracy is unthinkable save in terms of … parties’.

Yet political parties vary enormously in respect of their social rootedness, policies, size, organisation, internal distribution of power and candidate recruitment, but also, for example, in how they operate within and between legislatures and executives. Similarly there is a myriad of ways in which electoral systems can be structured, and considerable diversity in, for example, the frequency, nature, financing, style and competitiveness of elections. Moreover, both parties and elections have in recent years undergone significant change, not least as a result of technological innovation, and both remain major topics of at times heated public debate.

In short, political parties and elections significantly shape the nature, quality and legitimacy of contemporary politics. This Masters is concerned above all with investigating the rich diversity of political parties and elections in the contemporary world. Keele was the first UK university to offer a taught Maters in political parties and elections and this course benefits from Keele’s unusually high concentration of international research and teaching expertise in this area, much of it organised in the Keele European Parties Research Unit.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/politicalpartiesandelections/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Political Parties and Elections is to provide you with the factual knowledge and conceptual and analytical skills that will enable you to reflect critically on the manner in which political parties and elections operate in the modern world. In addition, it provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate originality and self-direction in generating and investigating research questions. More broadly, it aims to assist you to develop a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to your intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare you for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and nongovernmental organisations, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Political Parties and Elections (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Political Parties and Elections (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Policy
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy (recommended)
• Right-Wing Radical Parties (recommended)
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks for modules, there are no additional compulsory additional costs.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The context underpinning this MA is the need to understand and respond to the problems and challenges generated by the UK’s diverse society. Read more

Overview

The context underpinning this MA is the need to understand and respond to the problems and challenges generated by the UK’s diverse society. Cultural and religious diversity is capable of promoting a culturally rich, open-minded society able to draw on a wide range of perspectives in confronting social, economic and political challenges at local, national and international levels. Conversely, a diverse society has the capacity to harbour deep divisions which can lead to problems of ghettoisation, social and political disengagement, inequality, resentment, mistrust, insecurity and discrimination. The need to address such difficulties and the aspiration to achieve a thriving diversity demands dialogue to increase interaction and understanding between different sectors of the community.

The MA in Dialogue Studies will provide Masters level teaching and experience catered to the demands of such efforts. It is intended to the equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to effectively engage in and lead meaningful dialogue advancing intercultural interaction, community cohesion and proactive citizenship. It aims to develop reflective practitioners and students of dialogue equipped to examine and evaluate theories of dialogue and carry them forward with appropriate adaptations and innovations. A distinctive and innovative feature of the programme is a placement with the Dialogue Society in London during which students will develop their skills through active participation in the work of this charity.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/dialoguestudies/

Course Content

The structure of the MA in Dialogue Studies is as follows:

Semester 1:
- Approaches in Dialogue (30 credits) core module
- Learning and Research Skills (30 credits) core module
- Students to choose one optional module (15 credits each)

Semester 2:
- Dialogue Work Placement (45 credits) core module

Summer Dissertation (60 credits) core module

Optional modules may include:
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.
- Approaches to European Integration:History and Practice
- Comparative European Politics
- Diplomatic Law
- The Changing International Agenda

Teaching & Assessment

The programme has three components: taught modules in the 1st semester; a placement at the Dialogue Society in the 2nd semester; and a dissertation to be completed by a September deadline.

The taught modules consist of a number of weekly 2 hour seminars. These modules provide students with theoretical and substantive knowledge, key learning and research skills, and an opportunity to interact with staff and other students. Assessment will vary between modules but typically will involve presentations, coursework, and essays.

The placement with the Dialogue Society in the 2nd semester will allow students to gain experience working for an NGO. Students will be involved in planning, organising and evaluating seminars; planning, organising and evaluating community events; and attending Dialogue Society training events which provide key leadership and communications skills. The placement will be assessed by a reflective diary.

The dissertation will be on a topic of the student’s choice relating to intercultural dialogue, community cohesion, diversity, citizenship or conflict resolution. Students will be assigned supervisors who they will meet on a regular basis.

Additional Costs

Students will be expected to buy textbooks for modules and additional costs may be incurred for travel to placement activities in London.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Columbia, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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