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Full Time MA Degrees in Northampton, United Kingdom

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The University of Northampton has a long standing reputation for high quality teaching and research, and is passionate about transforming the lives of children and young people in the UK and internationally. Read more
The University of Northampton has a long standing reputation for high quality teaching and research, and is passionate about transforming the lives of children and young people in the UK and internationally.

With its thriving community of practice, Early Years at the University of Northampton has established a well-earned national and international reputation. Our tutors have all worked in health, education or social care practice and are experts in their respective disciplines within the early years’ field: the combination of our expertise is the strength of our teaching team which offers our students far more than the sum of our parts.

Our MA Education Early Years Pathway offers opportunities for graduates who work in early years to extend their knowledge, understanding and skills in ways that are ‘…inspiring and eye opening: it will change the way you think’ (MA Education Early Years Pathway student). ‘Challenge, inspiration, professional and personal growth are guaranteed through critical engagement with contemporary inter-disciplinary issues in early childhood education and care’ – Dr. Eunice Lumsden, Head of Early Years.

Course content

The MA Education Early Years Pathway offers Level 7 study to professionals working in the early years field to:
-Critically evaluate the impact of recent legislation and policy on Early Years provision.
-Enhance their knowledge and understanding of children’s development in its widest sense.
-Investigate and critique theoretical perspectives in early childhood and their applications to practice.
-Engage with multi-disciplinary research and literature influencing developments in Early Years policy and practice.
-Critically explore cutting-edge developments in the Early Years field, in the UK and internationally.

Throughout the Early Years MA Pathway, opportunities to engage in deep-level critical reflection with other like-minded professionals and specialist tutors enable our students to gain secure understanding of complex issues in the dynamic and exciting field of Early Years to inform their professional practice.

The MA Education (Early Years) offers a flexible approach through standard or blended approaches. You can either chose to study a full MA degree, or may exit the programme earlier to attain other qualifications:
-Stage one: two M level modules, exit with a Certificate in Postgraduate Studies in Education (Early Years).
-Stage two: two M level modules, exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Early Years).
-Stage three: Dissertation or Research Thesis, leading to the full MA degree.

Course modules (16/17)

-Research Thesis
-Supporting Parents and Developing Communities
-Promoting Inclusive Practice
-Autism in the Early Years
-Young Children’s Rights and Participation
-Contemporary and international Issues in the Early Years
-Young Children’s Literature, Media and Culture
-Documenting Young Children’s Learning
-Organisational Based Project
-Advanced Practice in Early Childhood Education
-Perspectives on Leadership and Management
-Dissertation
-Research Methods

Methods of Learning

The entire MA involves 140 hours of taught sessions, all of which are taught as interactive sessions involving activities and discussions. This means students will typically attend classes for 6 hours per week if studying full time, although this may vary depending on the modules taken. In addition full-time students will be expected to undertake a further 24 hours per week of private study and research. Part-time students taking the course over 3 years will be expected to do a third of this. You should however be aware that this is not consistently spread across the year and that at some points you may be working considerably more hours in a week. There will also be the chance to attend additional optional sessions and presentations connected to the research undertaken at Faculty of Education and Humanities.

Assessments

The course assessment involves essays, portfolios, presentations, practical projects and small scale studies. Students will complete their final Dissertation or Research Thesis on a topic negotiated with a tutor.

Careers

Typical career opportunities for MA graduates in the Early Years field include:
-Leadership roles in early years and schools.
-Lecturing in further and higher education.
-Research in the field of early years.
-Policy development in the field of early years.

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The programme is designed for teachers and other professionals working in the field of education as well as recent graduates. Read more
The programme is designed for teachers and other professionals working in the field of education as well as recent graduates.

The course provides participants with opportunities to enhance their practice by reflecting on their own personal and professional experiences and developing further skills, knowledge and understanding of aspects of specific interest. It can be taken both full and part time. The full-time course has a distinct international and comparative perspective, whilst the part-time option contains the same modules as the full-time course but with additional modules related to teacher-led research, mathematics and early years.

Distinctive approaches to learning and teaching

The course is taught through a series of lectures, seminars and workshops. All teaching takes place in small groups which enables you to engage in discussion and debate. In addition to the main programme, you will have opportunities to attend research seminars, day courses and other activities.

All modules are taught by members of the university’s academic staff. The course also makes use of visiting lecturers from other academic institutions from within the UK and further. The underpinning delivery principle of our teaching is that we seek to demonstrate the ongoing links between theory and practice: we offer all our course members the chance to engage in rich dialogue and critical reflection on work based issues, concerns and developments.

Additional Costs

There are no additional fees in connected with this programme other than the requirement to be a suitably equipped student with a pen and paper. There are computers and computer spaces available at the university and the university library contains all required texts.

Course content

The MA comprises of modules that can be studied one by one. A key element of many modules is the provision for ‘shared enquiry’, enabling participants to engage with other professional colleagues and researchers in developing critical approaches to enquiry within practical education (and education-related) contexts.

Assessment procedures are flexible and sensitive to existing professional workloads, and are usually based on aspects of work currently ongoing in the participant’s own school or setting.

There is a full time pathway through this MA. This is particularly targeted at international students and has a strong international and comparative flavour, although UK students are very welcome to apply. It consists of four compulsory modules and a thesis.

The four modules that must be taken on the full-time pathway are:
-School and Classroom Cultures
-Educational Leadership
-International Perspectives on Education
-Research methods

In addition to this the University now has pathways within the course which reflect two specific areas of professional and theoretical interest:
-MA Education (Mathematics)
-MA Education (Early Years)

There is also an MA Education Special Educational Needs and Inclusion which is run on a full and part time basis.

There are also a range of modules which enable teachers to engage with reflective, teacher-led research.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Perspectives on Education
-Research Methods
-Educational Leaderships
-Investigating Individual Professional Practice (Part 2) Post Threshold
-School and Classroom Cultures
-Dissertation

Methods of Learning

The entire MA involves 140 hours of taught sessions, all of which are taught as interactive sessions involving activities and discussions. This means you will typically attend classes for 6 hours per week if studying full time, although this may vary depending on the modules taken. In addition full-time students will be expected to undertake a further 24 hours per week of private study and research. Part-time students taking the course over 3 years will be expected to do one third of this. You should however be aware that this is not consistently spread across the year and that at some points they may be working considerably more hours in a week.There will also be the chance to attend additional optional sessions and presentations connected to the research undertaken at Faculty of Education and Humanities.

Assessments

There are no examinations. The course has a mixture of assessments involving essays, portfolios, presentations and small scale research projects. Participants will complete a final project/dissertation on a topic negotiated with a tutor for the MA Education.

Facilities and Special Features

-Modules relevant to those working in children’s and young people’s services.
-Recognised postgraduate professional development for teachers.
-Modules can be taken ‘stand alone’ for professional development.
-Modules can build into three successive postgraduate awards from Certificate to Diploma and Masters.
-Modules relevant to those working in early years or children’s services.
-Employment related course designed to fit with participants’ work.
-Modules designed to connect with practitioner work and context.
-Highly experienced and supportive tutor team.

Other admission requirements

Applicants who have recent professional experience of three years or more will be positively considered. In this case the applicant will be interviewed and must demonstrate suitability for the course by providing evidence of significant professional engagement in children’s services at graduate level or equivalent. The evidence will be in the form of a compendium or portfolio which sets out details of their specific responsibilities relating to their work with children and young people.

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The University of Northampton has a long standing reputation for high quality teaching and research and is passionate about transforming the lives of children and young people in the UK and internationally. Read more
The University of Northampton has a long standing reputation for high quality teaching and research and is passionate about transforming the lives of children and young people in the UK and internationally.

With its thriving community of practice, Education (Mathematics) at the University of Northampton has established a well-earned national reputation. Our tutors have all taught in schools and are experts in their respective disciplines within the mathematics teaching field: the combination of our expertise is the strength of our teaching team which offers our students far more than the sum of our parts.

Our MA in Education (Mathematics) Pathway offers opportunities for graduates who work in teaching to extend their knowledge, understanding and skills. One students says‘…[the tutor] makes managing studying alongside work manageable. What we learn is so interesting it doesn’t seem like a chore. Thank you.’ (MA in Education [Mathematics] student).

Course content

The MA in Education (Mathematics) Pathway offers Level 7 study to professionals teaching mathematics to:
-Critically evaluate the impact of recent legislation and policy on mathematics provision.
-Enhance their knowledge and understanding of children’s mathematical development.
-Investigate and critique theoretical perspectives in mathematics and their applications to practice.
-Engage with research and literature influencing developments in mathematics teaching policy and practice.
-Critically explore cutting-edge developments in the mathematics teaching field, in the UK and internationally.

Throughout the MA in Education (Mathematics) Pathway, opportunities to engage in deep-level critical reflection with other like-minded professionals and specialist tutors enable our students to gain secure understanding of complex issues in the dynamic and exciting field of mathematics teaching to inform their professional practice.

The MA in Education (Mathematics) offers a flexible approach through standard or blended approaches. Participants can either choose to study a full MA degree, or may exit the programme earlier to attain other qualifications:
-Stage one: two specified M level modules, exit with a Postgraduate Certificate in Primary Mathematics.
-Stage two: two further M level modules, exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (Mathematics).
-Stage three: Dissertation or Research Thesis, leading to the full MA in Education (Mathematics) degree.

Course modules (16/17)

-Research Thesis
-Curriculum Leadership in Mathematics
-Contemporary Issues in Mathematics Education
-Mathematical Topics
-Mathematical Processes
-Inclusion in Mathematics Teaching and Learning
-Organisational based Project
-Principles and Practice in Coaching and Mentoring

Methods of Learning

The entire MA involves 140 hours of taught sessions, all of which are taught as interactive sessions involving activities and discussions. This means students will typically attend classes for six hours per week if studying full time, although this may vary depending on the modules taken. In addition full-time students will be expected to undertake a further 24 hours per week of private study and research. Part-time students taking the course over three years will be expected to do one third of this. You should however be aware that this is not consistently spread across the year and that at some points you may be working considerably more hours in a week. There will also be the chance to attend additional optional sessions and presentations connected to the research undertaken at the Faculty of Education and Humanities.

Assessments

The course assessment involves essays, portfolios, presentations, practical projects and small scale studies. Students will complete their final Dissertation or Research Thesis on a topic negotiated with a tutor.

Careers

Typical career opportunities for MA graduates in the field include leadership roles in schools, lecturing in further and higher education, research in the field of mathematics education and policy development in the field of mathematics education.

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This programme is designed for managers and leaders in a variety of educational settings including. schools, government offices and NGO’s. Read more
This programme is designed for managers and leaders in a variety of educational settings including: schools, government offices and NGO’s. Through this course, students will explore the nature of leadership and management in educational settings. Study support groups will provide an opportunity for you to be given structured advice about your assignments and practical help with organising your work, conducting literature searches and managing your reading. These support groups will additionally afford you an opportunity to work in teams with other students on the course and with the support of experienced researchers.

Course content

Aspects of leadership and management that will be taught in this programme include: distributed leadership and communities of practice, school evaluation and school improvement, and leadership in an international context. There is a specific module on coaching and mentoring. Finally there is the flexibility to study an aspect of leadership in depth via the thesis.

Course modules (16/17)

-Perspectives on Leadership and Management
-Approaches to Leadership and Management
-Research Methods
-Research Thesis
-Developing and Supporting Others
-Investigating Professional Practice 1 and 2
-International Perspectives on Education
-Designing for the 21st Century Learning
-Dissertation

Methods of Learning

The entire MA involves up to 140 hours of taught sessions, all of which are taught as interactive sessions involving activities and discussions. This means students will typically attend classes for three hours per week if studying full time, although this may vary depending on the modules taken. In addition full-time students will be expected to undertake a further 24 hours per week of private study and research. Part-time students taking the course over three years will be expected to do one third of this. They should however be aware that this is not consistently spread across the year and that at some points they may be working considerably more hours in a week. There will also be the chance to attend additional optional sessions and presentations connected to the research undertaken at Faculty of Education and Humanities.

Schedule

For part-time students, the course is structured over three years. However, if master’s level (level 7 credits) have been attained on other courses including the PGCE, NPQH, or programmes run by University of Northampton then it is possible to complete this MA in just two years.

Assessments

The course assessment involves essays, portfolios, presentations and small scale research projects. Students will complete their final dissertation on a topic negotiated with a tutor.

Facilities and Special Features

The University of Northampton has a long standing reputation for high quality teaching, and is passionate about transforming the lives of children and young people in the UK and Internationally.

Careers

Often leads to job promotion within the field of education.

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This exciting programme, offered as a one or two year course, will examine the role of contemporary literature in a number of different contexts. Read more
This exciting programme, offered as a one or two year course, will examine the role of contemporary literature in a number of different contexts. You will have an opportunity to explore a diverse range of texts from Modernists such as Samuel Beckett through to popular narrative mediums including film and comic books.

Course content

You need 180 credits to gain the award of MA. Taught modules are 20 credits while the dissertation accounts for 60 credits. Taught modules are as follows:

Course modules (16/17)

-Critical Theory & Methodologies
-Pulp Visions
-Literary Modernism in the Postmodern World
-Contemporary British Gothic
-Gender and Writing
-Narrative and the Deviant Body
-Brave New Worlds
-Postcolonial Literatures
-Trauma Fiction
-Down to Earth: Contemporary Poetry
-Dissertation
-Twenty-First Century Storytelling
-Telefantasy
-Adaptations

Opportunities Abroad

You can elect to spend your second term with one of our Erasmus partners as part of the funded Erasmus scheme. We have agreements with the University of Zaragoza, Spain and the University of Muenster, Germany.

Information about the Erasmus scheme can be found on the British Council page.

Methods of Learning

Taught modules are normally timetabled on Tuesdays 6pm-9pm and Thursdays 10am-1pm. Both one year full-time and two year part-time routes are available.

Assessments

The final assessment consists of a presentation on the research proposal (10%) and submission of a 15-18,000 word dissertation (90%).

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The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level. Read more
The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level.

The course facilitates critical debate between artists working both within and across media areas including painting, photography, digital imaging, printmaking, sculpture, installation and site-specific art. Alongside their studio-based enquiry, students undertake related research into the broader context of contemporary art practices and theoretical debates.

The course offers access to comprehensive specialist resources with technical instruction and support. Students are continually mentored by research-active staff to position their practice within professional cultural environments, arts-related employment or higher-level academic research.

Both full time and part time students benefit from spacious and well-equipped facilities and external links with galleries, which have included the Milton Keynes Gallery, NN Contemporary (Northampton), Corby Cube Gallery and Rugby Museum and Art Gallery. The course often offers international study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

In addition to the course having very good links with regional galleries and arts organisations, students are encouraged to engage with external activities and events, both national and international. A group of MA Fine Art students recently attended a printmaking residency at the world-renowned Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium.

Our teaching staff have a broad range of research interests reflecting the disciplines available on the course, and all staff are practicing artists who publish and exhibit both nationally and internationally. Visiting speakers have included the internationally known artists Richard Long, Marcus Harvey, Simon Callery, Ian Davenport, Mark Francis, Lisa Milroy, David Batchelor, Richard Deacon, Svetlana Fialova, Richard Patterson, Ian McKeever, Dan Hays and Richard Wilson along with innovative arts organisations such as Artangel.

Course content

Upon commencing the Masters programme, students undertake the module ‘Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies’ (20 credits). This provides a grounding in different research-based methods and methodologies in Fine Art.

During the first trimester students also undertake the 20 credit studio-based module ‘Fine Art Practice’ wherein students begin to critically re-appraise and position their creative practice. Full-time students will also be enrolled on ‘Interfacings,’ a 20 credit module that considers a set of theoretical debates, issues and contexts that are pertinent to an interdisciplinary approach to artistic practice.

During the second trimester students enrol on the 40 credit module ‘Fine Art Practice and Context.’ This module culminates in a public developmental exhibition of their work. Alongside this module, full-time students can opt to take either the project-based ‘Independent Study’ module or the 20 credit module ‘Creative Practice and Enterprise.’

The final stage of the MA Fine Art course entails the student producing and exhibiting a body of creative work or completing a 15-18,000 word dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Fine Art Practice and Documentation
-Interfacings: Fine Art and Postmodern Practice
-Creative Practice and Enterprise
-Fine Art Practice and Context
-Independent Study in the Arts
-Research project
-Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies

Opportunities Abroad

International study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

Methods of Learning

The MA Fine Art course supports all learners’ experience and development through a breadth of regular tutorial approaches. Tutor and learner contact is additionally enriched through a host of visiting artists of international stature. Modes of teaching delivery encompass tutorials, group crits, research supervision, lectures and seminars.

Schedule

During the first and second trimester specific modules are delivered usually on Mondays 9:30-12:30 and 13:00 – 16:00.

Assessments

The course is assessed in both theory and practice by assignment, examination, portfolio submission and exhibition.

In addition to an ongoing series of formative assessment points, the MA Fine Art course has three formal assessment periods that occur at the end of each trimester in February, May and September respectively.

Facilities and Special Features

The Fine Art subject is enriched through a spectrum of professional specialist spaces including: Fine Art New Media Space, Photographic Studio, Photographic Dark Room, Wood Workshop, Metal Workshop, Plaster and Resin Workshop, Etching Printroom, Screen Printing Room (including laser cutting), The Drawing Lab (Drawing research space and life room), Canvas Preparation Room and bookable installation spaces.

Careers

The course prepares students for the professional cultural environment and higher research study. PhDs at the University of Northampton can be pursued through traditional or practice led methodologies and this course provides a comprehensive and relevant foundation.

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This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives. Read more
This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives.

The MA in History provides students with opportunities to study the subject at an advanced level. It allows students to undertake detailed study of a range of periods and processes – from Britain’s experience of warfare to the material culture of the English country house. By studying particular topics in depth, students are encouraged to think not only about the diversity of the past, but also how history itself is constructed.

Students will develop the skills necessary to understand, critique, utilise and communicate concepts and theories used within the discipline of History. They will acquire methodological skills for historical research, particularly the selection, evaluation and interpretation of primary sources.

The course comprises 120 credits of taught modules and a 60 credit dissertation. Students must take the History Research Methods module and complete a dissertation. The remainder of the programme is made up from a selection of specialist modules (normally three 30 credit modules) which reflect staff research expertise.

Course content

The MA is taught on a full time and part time basis, with the opportunity to complete in one and two years respectively. The year is split into three trimesters.

Full time students take 60 credits in each of the first two trimesters, running from September to January and February to May. They then complete their dissertation over the spring and summer trimesters, from February to September.

Part time students take 60 credits of modules in their first year (normally two 30 credit modules in each of the first two trimesters) and 60 credits of modules in their second years, plus the 60 credit dissertation.

Modules are normally fourteen weeks in duration – alternating fortnightly between evening classes on campus (typically 6pm to 9pm on a weekday) and online learning activities. Students are also encouraged to attend the History Research Seminar, which runs monthly in the evening. All students must take History Research Methods before proceeding to their dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-History Research Methods
-British Colonialism and Islamic Politics, c. 1800-1970
-Men at Arms: Masculinity and War in Britain, 1756-1918
-Consumption and the Country House, 1660-1830
-Exploring English Society, 1500-1750
-Medicine and Healing Through the Ages
-Violence and the Law in English Society
-Britain and the First World War
-From Privilege to Pressure: English Landed Society, 1850-1950
-Breeding Supermen: Eugenics in Britain, America and Germany
-Narrating the Nation: Rethinking Modern British History
-Dissertation
-Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Britain from 1945 to the Present Day

Methods of Learning

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students will have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Schedule

One year full time or two years part time.

Assessments

Assessment is by coursework only, consisting of assessments such as essays, student presentations, book reviews and seminar portfolios.

For the award of Master’s, students must accumulate a total of 180 credits, including a 15,000 word dissertation, undertaken under the supervision of an appropriate member of the course team. A Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits.

Facilities and Special Features

-Teaching takes place in evening classes, blended with online learning activities, providing a convenient programme for postgraduate learners.
-Students study a range of specialist topics in-depth with staff who are engaged in research and publication.
-Much of the teaching is centred on the use and interpretation of primary sources, giving students the opportunity to engage in active learning.

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University of Northampton Faculty of Business and Law
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In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. Read more
In today’s global, fast-moving business environment it is often people that determine organisational success. Human Resources Management (HRM) is a strategic, business-focused approach to managing people. HR specialists help organisations achieve success by providing knowledge, expertise and insight into a wide range of HRM activities from talent resourcing and selection, performance management, learning and development, change management and employee engagement. HR can be an exciting, rewarding and challenging career that can take you anywhere in the world.

If you are seeking roles within HR, you may find that employers require a qualification that leads to membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). This programme is accredited by the CIPD and has been specifically designed to meet the needs of HR professionals wishing to further their career and progress into senior roles.

If you have some experience within the working environment and want to develop your HRM knowledge or have completed an HRM (or related) degree, find out more about the opportunities on offer through the MA in Human Resource Management.

CIPD Membership

The CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development) is the professional body for HR and people development which aims to champion better work and better working lives. As a HRM student you will become part of this professional body and on completion of the programme will be able to upgrade your status to a chartered member of the CIPD.

All students are required to enrol as CIPD student members and to remain in membership throughout the duration of the programme.

Subscription fee is payable direct to CIPD and excluded from the course fee. For more information on the fees please refer to the CIPD Website: http://www.cipd.co.uk/

Students will be encouraged to join, support and participate in local CIPD branch activities. These are the Northampton and Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire groups. Although you will, officially, be a member of only one CIPD group, you are welcome to attend any of the group meetings some of which will be delivered by Northants branch as part of the programme.

For more information on the local branch see the Northampton (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/midlands-area-partnership/northamptonshire/default.aspx) or Milton Keynes/Bedfordshire (http://www.cipd.co.uk/local/bedfordshire-milton-keynes/) websites.

Course content

The aim of this course is to develop you as an HR professional. You will be introduced to specialised knowledge and research evidence giving you an in depth understanding of successful people management in organisations. Perhaps more importantly, you will practice the tools and techniques of strategic and operational HRM giving you practical, insight-driven experience which will help further your career.

The modules on this course are designed to provide you with expert knowledge of distinct HR subject areas together with exposure to contemporary debates, policies and practices, keeping you at the forefront of developments in your field.

You will develop an understanding of HRM within a range of organisational contexts, and you will be equipped with the analytical and diagnostic skills required of HR professionals.

In addition to the modules making up this course you will attend a two day off-site residential at the end of the taught programme focusing specifically on skills development activities. Attendance at the residential is a course requirement and the cost is included in the course fees.

Semester 1

HRM in Context – You will explore HRM in a business context to develop your understanding of the increasingly complex environments HR must work within both inside and external to organisations. This module allows learners to develop analysis skills to facilitate informed choices on which strategies may be most and least appropriate.

Investigating a Business Issue – You will diagnose and investigate a live business issue from a HR perspective, locate the issue within the body of contemporary knowledge, collect and analyse data, derive supportable conclusions and make practical and actionable recommendations for change and enhancement of current practice.

Resourcing and Talent Management – You will evaluate strategies for resourcing and managing talent within the organisation. There is a focus on activities concerned with resourcing the organisation; the practical aspects of recruitment, selection, employee retention and dismissal, and also on the strategic aspects of planning an organisation’s long and short term human resource requirements. This requires analysis of external labour markets and considerations of flexibility, as well as consideration of how internal labour markets may be made more productive and effective.

Performance Management – You will investigate the management of employee performance within the organisation, exploring the evidence that people are a major source of competitive advantage and the challenge of how best to develop and manage people to maximize their performance. You will assess the major systems for enhancing the performance of employees at all levels and advise organisations on the most appropriate methods for managing performance.

Semester 2

Leading Managing and Developing People – You will analyse key factors in leading, managing and developing people for organisational success. Every organisation is made up of individuals whose behaviour, individually or collectively will impact on its ability to succeed. Organisational performance can be enhanced and competitive advantage increased through the strategic management, leadership and development of people. This module enables you to gain an in-depth knowledge of HRM and HRD and to explore major themes from the growing literature and research in this subject area.

Learning and Talent Development – You will develop a critical understanding of the role and influence of a range of contextual factors associated with the design, delivery and evaluation of learning and development in a variety of organisational contexts. You will also explore and evaluate the contribution of learning and talent development strategies and practices in meeting the aspirations, ambitions and objectives of the organization and the individual. This is a seven week module.

Employment Relations – You will develop and reflect upon your knowledge and understanding of Employment Relations from a number of different perspectives. The holistic significance of employment relations within an organisation is emphasised together with the importance of aligning HR policies with business strategy, change processes, employee voice and involvement practices. Good employee relations are important for an organisation’s success in the achievement of its business objectives and for gaining employee commitment to those objectives. Increasing legislation in this area has also brought pressure to develop appropriate managerial strategies to ensure employee commitment to organisational success. This is a seven week module.

Semester 3

Research Methods and Dissertation – In this semester you will work on completing a 16,000 word dissertation. You will undertake this as self-study and you will be allocated a supervisor who will guide and support you through this process. Meetings with your supervisor are not compulsory but are strongly recommended.

At the end of teaching you will undertake a two day residential course that will explore how to put all the skills from the course into developing good HR practices.

Course modules (16/17)

-HRM in Context
-Leading, Managing and Developing People
-Investigating a Business Issue
-Performance Management
-Dissertation and Research Methods
-Resourcing and Talent Management
-Learning and Talent Development
-Employment Relations

Methods of Learning

The learning and teaching style on this course is designed to enable you to take responsibility for your own learning and skills development within a caring environment facilitated by high quality academic support from tutors. You will be introduced to much of the core course content through activities that can be undertaken in your own time, off campus. These will usually be facilitated through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment – a web-based portal where you will be able to participate in learning activities, on-line discussions, reading and reflection. During on-campus sessions, the emphasis will be on participative and interactive activities designed to consolidate and develop your understanding through debate, discussion, role-play and participation in events such as guest speakers and a mock employment tribunal.

The course uses a carefully balanced combination of in-course assignments designed to enrich your learning which include business projects, reflective activities, group work presentation, examinations and a substantial research dissertation

This course usually has a diverse student group and this diversity provides a rich basis for sharing of different experiences and thinking on organisational and people issues. Peer networking and action learning sets will be facilitated and encouraged to maximise the learning to be gained from different student experiences.

Full-time students will take four modules in both Semester 1 and 2, part-time students will take two modules in both Semester 1 and 2.

Each module will require you to attend a three hour workshop per week.

For full-time students, taught sessions will normally be delivered over two days each week. For part-time students, it would normally be one day per week.

To maximise chances of success on this course, we recommend students spend approximately 12 hours a week per module in self-directed study time to prepare for the sessions and complete assignments.

Assessments

Assessment will be undertaken by a range of methods including written assignments, business reports, projects, reflective activities, group work, presentations and examinations.

The 16,000 word Dissertation is a major component of this course and allows students to demonstrate a range of knowledge, skills and insight in their chosen topic area.

Facilities and Special Features

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), Europe’s largest professional body supporting and developing those responsible for the management and development of people within organisations. The MA HRM reflects and incorporates CIPD knowledge and competence requirements. Completing the MA HRM will provide you with the underpinning knowledge required for Chartered CIPD membership. If you have the relevant experience you can then apply for full membership based on your workplace activities and behaviours through the CIPD.

Careers

The MA HRM opens the way for a career in HRM/HRD. The programme provides opportunities for individuals to develop enhanced, specialist, higher level knowledge, skills and leadership capabilities and equips students with enhanced career pathways in the HRM/HRD field within different organisational contexts.

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University of Northampton Faculty of Business and Law
Distance from Northampton: 0 miles
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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University of Northampton Faculty of Business and Law
Distance from Northampton: 0 miles
This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. Read more
This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. You will gain the skills required to manage sustainable tourism businesses, alongside the specialisms of strategic destination management and marketing. You will explore tourism’s relationship with the socio-economic and political contexts within international development, tourism disasters affecting tourist destinations, and the role of tourism in the development of countries that have experienced conflict. An emphasis upon the micro-economic contribution of enterprise projects to support development and sustainability also features within the curriculum; delivered through the Ashoka Changemaker philosophy.

Upon completion of the programme, you may wish to progress your studies through a doctoral qualification.

Course content

The programme encourages you to analyse and evaluate the relationship between sustainable development principles and the management of destinations to achieve long-term viability of resources; and the role of event tourism in destination development as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. In addition, the programme provides insight into the political economies surrounding development and the contribution that tourism makes to a destination’s risk mitigation, social renewal and recovery after disasters and post conflict scenarios.

Drawing on a variety of case studies and projects, the programme explores the global scope of tourism, the policies and strategies associated with successful management, the role the industry plays in international development, and the stakeholders involved in its development. The programme will also prepare students for the practical, project based, and customer focused characteristics of the tourism industry.

Semester 1

From the beginning of the programme, you will be introduced to some of the main themes in destination and tourism management, to enable you to analyse the strategic and dynamic nature of international tourist destinations and issues facing managers of such destinations. Modules in semester one will highlight the need to ensure long-term viability of destination resources through themes such as sustainable development and political economies of international development.

Semester 2

You will examine the vulnerability of destinations and the strategies and approaches needed by managers to develop and recover, particularly post-conflict. The strategic use of events in both the public and private sectors will be examined, particularly their use as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. There is a strong emphasis on developing personal adaptability in cross cultural (work) environments as Master graduates can be expected to, and will have the expectation to – lead and manage other people internationally. You will also begin to prepare for the completion of a dissertation through a series of taught research methods sessions, during which a research proposal is produced.

Semester 3

The research proposal produced in Semester two will guide the development of a clearly defined and evidenced study purpose, a critical review of the extant literature, and a robust methodology. Data is then collected, analysed, interpreted and applied to the study purpose, and a 15-20,000 word research report (dissertation) is produced, with the support of a dissertation supervisor.

For further information on course content and modules please refer to the award map: http://oldweb.northampton.ac.uk/caf/pgmsaward/international-tourism-development-ma

Course modules (16/17)

-Political Economies of International Development
-International Sustainable Tourism
-Strategic Destination Management
-Risk, Crisis and Post-conflict Management in Tourism
-Strategic Events Management
-Managing Across Cultures
-Dissertation​ and Research Methods

Opportunities Abroad

In previous years students have participated in an optional study trip to an international destination. The cost of this optional trip would not normally exceed £500 for flights and accommodation. Students normally allow an additional £100 for their expenses.

The programme team also aims to provide a regional or national study trip annually to a tourism attraction or exhibition. In some cases students are required to contribute to the cost of entry; this would normally not exceed £50.00.

Methods of Learning

Typically you will have nine hours (approximately) of contact time with your tutor in the first semester and eleven hours (approximately) in the second. Overall you will spend 108 hours per module in self-directed study (reading and research).

Assessments

A variety of individual and group based assessments are used including reports, presentations, posters, e-portfolios, projects, client briefs, multiple choice tests and examinations.

Facilities and Special Features

Ashoka U is the global association of the world’s leading universities supporting social entrepreneurs; those working together to create solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems. The programme emphasises this philosophy, through Ashoka Changemaker projects.

Careers

The programme will interest students wishing to pursue a specialist career in destination management, sustainable tourism management or international development, with an emphasis on employment within development organisations, NGOs, aid organisations, post conflict and disaster charities, as well as public and private sector tourism organisations.

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University of Northampton Faculty of Health and Society
Distance from Northampton: 0 miles
The Masters in Social Work is the professional postgraduate qualification for social work throughout the UK. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and values appropriate for work in a variety of social work settings. Read more
The Masters in Social Work is the professional postgraduate qualification for social work throughout the UK. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge, skills and values appropriate for work in a variety of social work settings. The teaching and learning is delivered by qualified/registered Social Work academic staff who are actively engaged in research, consultancy, direct practice and publication.

Course content

Social workers deal with some of the most vulnerable people in society at times of greatest stress. By the end of this programme you will have been assessed against the Standards of Proficiency for Social Work and the Professional Capabilities Framework. Once qualified, you will be able to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration. Competent practice is essential for the award and you will undertake 200 days of practice learning (placement and skills for practice) during the programme. Practice learning through placement experience is undertaken in blocks of the course and skills for practice, 30 days experiential skills for practice during Year one (in the university), 70 days (in placement) during Year 1 and 100 days (in placement) during Year two.

For students enrolled on the programme, you will be expected to travel to placements with employer providers and be able to travel to service users. Being a holder of a current UK driving licence is therefore desirable.

Year One
During this initial year your knowledge and skills for social work practice is developed and assessed. The value base of social work is emphasised and you will engage in teaching designed to support your learning and understanding of anti-oppressive, anti-discriminatory and anti-racist practice in a model that promotes social justice and relationship based practice. The Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice module is designed to develop students’ skills, knowledge and understanding about social work. The course is delivered by a range of qualified social work academics, service users and social work practitioners, which includes 30 days experiential skills. You will have an opportunity to undertake a five-day shadow placement with an employer provider in a social work setting. The first year is designed to prepare and assess students’ ‘readiness for direct practice’ prior to the 70 day placement

Year Two
You will develop your understanding of different service user groups and service provision in social work settings building on the teaching and learning during Year one. The teaching will provide opportunities for you to work in small learning sets developing your reflective critical thinking skills. A module on diversity develops your understanding of the correlations between oppression, discrimination and inequality and how gender shapes organisations and service delivery. A 100-day assessed placement learning opportunity will be completed in a social work setting. During this final year you will also undertake research which is either empirical or literature based which is presented in a final dissertation.

Masters in Social Work students will have the opportunity to enrol onto the Developing Housing Practice module. This is a 10 credit level 7 module which, on completion, gives students partial accreditation with the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) which is equivalent to 10 credits towards postgraduate housing related training. This would be offered to the Masters students as an elective online module. There are a number of overlaps between housing and social work which include: vulnerable adults, people seeking asylum, safeguarding children, domestic abuse, hate crime, community safety and anti-social behaviours. This optional module would support the employability of the Masters students and offer a unique partial accreditation in housing-related training which complements social work.

Course modules (16/17)

-Life Span 1: Human Growth and Development
-Diversity
-Social Work Law and Policy
-Dissertation and Research Skills for Effective Social Work Practice
-Preparing for Professional Social Work Practice
-Life Span 2: Assessing and Managing Risk in Child and Adult Protection
-Developing Housing Practice, Knowledge and Provision
-Gender and Sexuality Studies in Social Work

Methods of Learning

This programme promotes an approach to learning that engages students as active participants. This includes group work, role play, individual skills development, inquiry based learning, seminars and lectures. Students link academic learning to two supervised and assessed placement learning opportunities. Over the two years you will experience a range of social work services and work with service users.

Facilities and Special Features

-Prepares you for professional social work practice
-Enables you to develop their practice skills
-Develops your skills and knowledge in working with other professions
-Raises political awareness and encourages you to be a creative, critical and reflective thinker
-The Social Work subject team sign up to and hold the International Federation of Social Work definition of social work
-Students will have the opportunity to develop a range of communication skills in the first year through experiential teaching and learning facilitated by Service Users, Social Work Practitioners and Practice Educators.

Careers

You will undertake 170 days of practice learning (placement). You will complete a student profile during the first year of study and through strong partnerships between the University and employer providers, you will be matched to a specific service placement. You will be expected to be able to travel effectively to and from the placement and be able to carry out community based duties (where required) during the placement which may involve independent travel. It is therefore desirable that you hold a current UK driving licence. Placement learning opportunities can be outside of Northampton. All placement providers are quality assured by the University.

Other admission requirements

English Language & Mathematics: Social work entrants must hold at least a GCSE grade C in English Language and Mathematics (O level grade C or CSE grade 1 are the equivalent). Key Skills Level Two qualifications are also acceptable. For students whose first language is not English an IELTS score of 7 is required.

You will be required to declare that you have these qualifications.
-Ability to write thoughtfully, insightfully and coherently about your motivation in applying for the course and understanding and commitment to the social work profession.
-Relevant work experience. Students must demonstrate (100 days or equivalent) relevant previous experience in social care or a related area. This could be paid or voluntary work.
-Students yet to graduate should provide an academic reference on the application, indicating their predicted degree classification. Students who have already graduated can also provide a professional reference.
-All applicants must confirm prior to interview/offer decision making that they have the ability to use basic IT facilities, including word processing, internet browsing and the use of email, and may be asked to specify how these skills have been obtained.

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This programme is aimed at people interested in developing their knowledge and skills in the field of autism spectrum, including Asperger syndrome. Read more
This programme is aimed at people interested in developing their knowledge and skills in the field of autism spectrum, including Asperger syndrome. This specialist pathway is ideal for professionals working in early years, primary or secondary schools, further and higher education, voluntary sector, advisory roles, and residential settings. It would also be available (subject to entry qualifications) to people with a personal interest, for example individuals on the autism spectrum and family members.

Course content

This programme provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of various aspects related to autism. The modules place specific emphasis on understanding autism from the individual and their family perspective. Theoretical perspectives related to autism and learning are explored in order to better understand the strengths and needs of individuals. A thorough analysis of evidence based approaches will be included in order to evaluate best practice in this field. The aim of the programme is to help participants to reduce the barriers that individuals with autism face in education and wider society. Participants will be encouraged to critically reflect and analyse their practice.

The modules undertaken will vary depending upon the selected exit award (PG certificate, diploma, MA). Each module is 30 level 7 CATs points, the final Dissertation is 60 CATs points. Students progressing to MA will undertake a Research Methods module and will complete a dissertation as part of their study.

Course modules (16/17)

-Understanding Autistic Spectrum Disorders
-Autism in the Early Years
-Understanding Challenging Behaviour in People with Autism and/or Learning Disabilities
-Evaluating Approaches for Individuals on the Autism Spectrum
-Research Thesis
-Dissertation
-Research Methods

Students on PG Diploma or MA will study another optional module such as Key concepts in Inclusion or Understanding Severe and Profound Multiple Learning Difficulties. Students on the MA route will then complete an independent research project, either the Dissertation on its own, or the Research Thesis and Research Methods modules together.

Methods of Learning

Modules will be taught through a combination of approaches such as lectures, seminars, group work, case studies, tutorials and independent enquiries. A key strength of our programme is our blended learning approach. This provides the opportunity to learn collaboratively both face to face and online.

Schedule

For this programme taught study would be a combination of lectures, seminars and online activities which is usually 3 hours per week, per module. We recommend students to spend 10 hours per week, per module in self-directed study time.

PG Certificate– one year full time or between one to two years part-time.

PG Diploma– one year full time or between two to three years part-time.

MA – one year full time or between two to four years part-time.

September, 2016/ 2017, Full-time and Part-time.

Assessments

Assessment procedures are flexible and sensitive to either personal interests or existing professional workloads. Modules are assessed on the basis of essays, case studies, portfolios or reports and small-scale research projects.

Facilities and Special Features

Facilities available
-Virtual Learning environment.
-Fantastic library facilities.

Special features
The course is taught by senior lecturers who have extensive professional experience of working with individuals on the autism spectrum across the age and ability range. In addition, lecturers have an extensive research background.

Careers

If you are already working in the field of autism then the in-depth knowledge you will gain from this programme can help you to improve your practice or apply for management positions. A range of other career options in education, social care and voluntary sectors will be possible, such as being an advocate, learning mentor, or family adviser. For those who want to pursue further post-graduate research there is also a possibility of studying for a PhD.

Work Experience - For students who do not have any practical experience in the field, optional opportunities to visit settings can be arranged.

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This programme is designed for anyone wishing to develop their knowledge and understanding of issues relating to special educational needs and inclusion at Master’s level, including practitioners working with children, young people and adults in a range of different contexts. Read more
This programme is designed for anyone wishing to develop their knowledge and understanding of issues relating to special educational needs and inclusion at Master’s level, including practitioners working with children, young people and adults in a range of different contexts. However, some modules may require people to be working in practice. We can also offer bespoke training packages for a variety of settings.

Course content

All the modules are 30 CATs points each, apart from the final Dissertation which is 60 CATs points and is a compulsory module for those aiming for a MA award.

Students can choose from a range of optional modules which provide an opportunity to critically reflect on debates and controversies surrounding the development of inclusive practice in a variety of settings and contexts, national and international and in relation to various individual needs.

Course modules (16/17)

-Promoting Inclusive Practice
-Understanding Dyslexia: Identification, Curriculum & Teaching
-Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders
-Perspectives on Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
-Pupils with Severe, Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties 1 and 2
-Key Concepts in Inclusion and Diversity
-Leadership and Management in BESD
-Understanding Multi-Sensory Impairment
-Physical Disabilities: Contexts and Interventions
-Physical Disabilities: Curriculum Issues
-Evaluating Approaches for Individuals on the Autism Spectrum
-Organisational based Project
-Research Methods
-Speech, Language and Communication needs
-Theoretical Perspectives on SpLD (Dyslexia) where are we now?
-The National Award for SEN Coordination 1 and 2
-Autism in the Early Years
-Using Standardised Assessments in Educational Settings: Theory and Practice
-Understanding Challenging Behaviour in People with Autism and/or Learning Disabilities
-Promoting EAL Practice (English Additional Learning and Bilingualism in Education)
-Research Thesis
-Dissertation

Students studying for a MA will have to complete a compulsory research project, either the Dissertation on its own, or a Research Thesis and the Research Methods module together.

Methods of Learning

Modules will be taught across three semesters per year through a combination of approaches such as lectures, seminars, group work, case studies, tutorials and independent enquiries. A key strength of our programme is our blended learning approach. This provides the opportunity to learn collaboratively both face to face and online.

Schedule

For this programme taught study would be a combination of lectures, seminars and online activities which is usually 3 hours per week, per module. We recommend students to spend 10 hours per week, per module in self-directed study time.

Students studying in India or Thailand will have block classes for 4-5 days with additional online support.

PG Certificate- one year full time or between one to two years part-time.
PG Diploma- one year full time or between two to three years part-time.
MA – one year full time or between two to four years part-time.

The programme has September and January in-takes for home students and September in-take only for international students.

Assessments

Assessment procedures are flexible and sensitive to either personal interests or existing professional workloads. Modules are assessed on the basis of essays, case studies, portfolios or reports and small-scale research projects.

Facilities and Special Features

Our integrated learning environment provides access to course materials and to a well-resourced library enabling students to access e-books and electronic journals from home.

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