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Sociology×

Full Time MA Degrees in Sociology, Manchester, United Kingdom

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
-Would you like to learn from leading innovators in research methods?. -Do you want to benefit from an outstanding team of educators and well-resourced teaching support materials?. Read more
-Would you like to learn from leading innovators in research methods?
-Do you want to benefit from an outstanding team of educators and well-resourced teaching support materials?
-Would you like the opportunity to study with internationally respected scholars?

Sociology at Manchester is one of the UK's largest and most prestigious centres for the subject, with over 30 academic staff and 60 postgraduate students forming a diverse and rigorous academic community.

The MA programme aims to provide students who have an interest in sociology, the opportunity to extend and deepen their knowledge of the discipline. Our teaching includes all areas of contemporary sociology but we have particular expertise in the fields of socio-cultural change, gender and sexuality, and consumption and sustainability.

We are consistently highly ranked for research, coming first in the UK for the percentage of our research outputs that are judged as `world-leading', and second nationally based on our research power in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). Our research feeds into all of our postgraduate teaching.

The Sociology MA is the perfect course to develop your analytical and investigative skills, training you in methods of social investigation in order to equip you with the ability for independent thinking, research and analysis, setting you up perfectly for the world of employment.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.
Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is normally by a 3,000 word assessed essay for each unit and, for the MA students, a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words.

Career opportunities

Many MA students go on to take research degrees (PhD), but the skills gained on this programme can be put to use in a variety of career paths. Careers which are most closely related include education, social and community work (related to a range of areas such as welfare advice, working with families or dealing with issues such as homelessness and mental health problems), human resources and working in the media.

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This course explores how processes of globalisation and internationalisation affect people's lives across the world. You will examine the processes in the global South as well as the global North and will develop your knowledge of perspectives on social movements, gender, ethnic and class divisions and analysis. Read more
This course explores how processes of globalisation and internationalisation affect people's lives across the world. You will examine the processes in the global South as well as the global North and will develop your knowledge of perspectives on social movements, gender, ethnic and class divisions and analysis. This will be supported by a thorough grounding in social science research methods and ways of interpreting data and change.

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The MA in Gender, Sexuality and Culture is a highly interdisciplinary programme that will. -Introduce new approaches to gender studies and sexuality studies as a theoretical, social, cultural, political and historical field of investigation. Read more
The MA in Gender, Sexuality and Culture is a highly interdisciplinary programme that will:
-Introduce new approaches to gender studies and sexuality studies as a theoretical, social, cultural, political and historical field of investigation
-Challenge current understandings of gender and sexuality by interrogating cultural identities, such as queer, heterosexual, homosexual, gay, straight, bisexual, transgendered
-Examine cultural production and cultural theory in relation to other power systems, such as race, ethnicity and class
offer training in research methods

This approach is unique within the UK as it brings together scholars who offer options in a range of academic disciplines, including English and American Studies, Art History or Visual Culture, History, Modern Language, Religions and Theology, History of Medicine, Sociology, Social Anthropology, and others. The research culture of the University of Manchester is unusually rich for the study of gender and sexuality, and many departments with offerings in this area are ranked 5 or 5*. Based in the Centre for the Study of Sexuality and Culture, graduate students can take advantage of the stimulating research environment with regular seminar series such as Gender, Sexuality and Culture: New Exchanges and conferences.

Students from all academic backgrounds are invited to apply.

Coursework and assessment

Students may take a range of options across the humanities and social sciences.

Career opportunities

Students in our programme have gone on to take up a diverse range of careers in both the public and private sectors. Some have gone on to pursue postgraduate research, and several have taken up jobs as teachers.

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics.

Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway.

Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Culture, Ethnography and Development pathway, there are currently 5 others.

Please note that it is not compulsory to select a pathway and all students will be awarded the same generic degree, MA in Social Anthropology.

Teaching and learning

In each semester, students take two 15-credit core modules, and a selection of optional modules that they select shortly after arrival. Many optional modules are worth 15 credits, though some are worth 30 credits. In total, students are required to achieve 120 coursework credits. Over the summer vacation, students are required to write a dissertation which is worth a further 60 credits.

In total, some 50 optional modules are available, not only in Social Anthropology but in a broad range of other disciplines across the Faculty of Humanities, including Visual Anthropology, Archaeology, Museum Studies, Latin American Studies, Development Studies, History, Sociology and Drama. Drawing on this broad range of disciplines, a number of pathways have been devised in order to maximize the academic and timetabling coherence of the options chosen by students.

The Culture, Ethnography & Development pathway provides you with the opportunity to study the history, theory and practice of development in a broad variety of social and geographical contexts, encouraging you to think of development critically as a complex transformative process that has cultural as well as economic and political consequences. You may select from modules covering a broad range of topics, including:
-Relationships of dependence between the global North and the global South
-Social and cultural effects of international labour migration
-The Millennium Development Goals
-The political economy of foreign investment
-Inequality and urban planning in the cities of the global South
-The international agenda for the reduction of poverty
-The impact of local civil society and NGOs
-Social welfare policies
-The politics of biodiversity conservation

Coursework and assessment

Most modules are assessed by means of an extended assessment essay. Typically, for 15 credit modules, these must be of 4000 words, whilst for 30 credit courses, they are normally of 6000 words. Certain options involving practical instruction in research methods, audiovisual media or museum display may also be assessed by means of presentations and/or portfolios of practical work. In addition, all MA students are required to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.
About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important.

Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media. Read more
-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media
-The course combines anthropology with practical training in film-making, editing, visual methods, photography, sensory ethnography and sound
-Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe

We welcome students from across the social sciences and humanities. The MA in Visual Anthropology is tailored to meet the needs of different levels of anthropological and film-making experience, whether you have little or no background in formal anthropology, film-production, visual methods and photography, or if you have substantial experience in one or more of these areas.

For nearly 30 years, the University's Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology has been widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology. Our graduates have produced more than 400 ethnographic films seen around the world and it is now at the forefront of the emergent dialogue between art and anthropology, including sensory ethnography and sound, experimental and practice-based methods, photographic and digital media, museum and gallery installations.

Our MA and MPhil courses combine anthropology with training in film-making and editing, visual methods, photography sensory ethnography and sound. Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internationally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe.

The Granada Centre's teaching and research continues to set the standard of excellence in the social sciences as well as arts. This was formally recognised by the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council), and by the AHRC, awarding the master's programme the status of a Professional Preparation masters, something awarded to no other visual anthropology programme in the UK.

Teaching and learning

The course combines conventional lectures and seminars with practical 'hands-on' instruction and workshops. Students work in teams and individually. Their final piece is an individual production, however throughout the year they will spend time working in teams so as to develop team-working & presentational skills as well as technical and artistic expertise. Work is presented to the class and receives feedback from fellow students as well as instructors. In this way, students learn to analyse their own and others works and through each other's successes and failures, generating a strong range of intellectual, practical and aesthetic resources as well as a sense of camaraderie and cooperation.

Coursework and assessment

During both semesters, students take 1 x 30-credit or 2 x 15 credit practical film or media courses and 2 x 15-credit lecture- or seminar-based modules on more theoretical, methodological or substantive ethnographic topics. The latter are each assessed by means of a 4000-word essay. The practical modules are assessed by various combinations of a portfolio of project work and an accompanying written text.

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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation. Read more
The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation.

This innovative, interdisciplinary course is taught by experts from sociological, legal and psychological backgrounds with real-world experience. You will benefit from research-led teaching as well as strong links to wider criminal justice professions and industry.
Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

Aims of the course:
-Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
-Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
-Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
-Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
-Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
-Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.
-Develop criminological knowledge and research skills for the writing of a Masters-level dissertation.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:
-Demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control;
-Demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas;
-Developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy;
-Recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies;
-Understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies;
-Demonstrated a critical awareness of research issues and methodologies related to the fields of criminology and/or criminal justice, combined with a knowledge of corresponding skills in undertaking a piece of research commensurate with Masters'-level study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Career opportunities

This master's offers you the specialists knowledge attractive for a range of criminal justice careers in areas such as local/central government, criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police, probation services, the voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks.

It also allows you to develop skills applicable to jobs in social research, management, third sector services, social work, and teaching.

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country. -You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run. Read more
-You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country
-You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run
-You are interested in strong methods training, which makes all the difference for future employability and future study

The democracy and elections pathway will appeal to students interested in aspects of formal and informal politics, party and non-party engagement, the elected and electors and in the relationship between the process of government and the normative foundations of democracy.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Read less
This course examines Criminology and criminal justice in their widest sense to include consideration of issues such as human rights, politics, international relations and social policy. Read more
This course examines Criminology and criminal justice in their widest sense to include consideration of issues such as human rights, politics, international relations and social policy. It gives students the opportunity to explore both theoretical and applied criminology, and to engage critically in considering the relationships between theory, research, policy and practice.

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The MA in Modern and Contemporary Literature prepares students to undertake research the post-1900 literature and its contexts, and is also popular with those wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with the period. Read more
The MA in Modern and Contemporary Literature prepares students to undertake research the post-1900 literature and its contexts, and is also popular with those wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with the period. It draws on a critical mass of members of academic staff and institutional resources at The University of Manchester in twentieth and twenty-first century literature, culture and theory. The modules have been designed to introduce you to cutting-edge approaches to modern and contemporary writing. You will study four units, including at least one of a small group of possible core courses. (You can also take two or all three of these courses if you wish.)

There are also further optional courses to choose from including the modules Contemporary Fiction, and Postcolonial Literatures, Genres, and Theories. After your modules are complete you will undertake a dissertation, supervised by a member of academic staff.

Teaching and learning

Modern and Contemporary Literature students take 4 modules, including at least 1 of the 3 possible core courses:
-Key Issues in Twentieth-Century Cultural Theory and Literary Criticism
-Modernism and its Margins
-Reading the Contemporary

Finally, students will write a 15,000-word dissertation, worth 60 credits, supervised by an academic member of staff.

Coursework and assessment

Students are required to take 180 credits of units as listed below.

The list of units on offer will be updated annually. Students may also choose up to 30 credits worth of units from another MA programme in place of one of their optional units, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.

Students will also attend seminars on such topics as how to study at MA level, how to research and write a Master's thesis, and career options.

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Visual and Sensory Media pathway. Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Visual and Sensory Media pathway, there are currently six others.

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.

Read less

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