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Full Time MA Degrees in Manchester, United Kingdom

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
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Why choose this course. -You would like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography. -You are considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes. Read more
Why choose this course:
-You would like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography
-You are considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes
-You want a course that is part of the North West Doctoral Training College (NWDTC)

This programme is designed to prepare students to carry out doctoral level research in Social Anthropology. It provides training in a wide range of research methods and teaches students how to develop a substantive research project in a theoretically and methodologically informed way. Although primarily intended as preliminary to doctoral research, the MA Anthropological Research programme is also available as a stand-alone taught MA degree for people who wish to improve their social research skills and gain an in-depth understanding of ethnographic methods and approaches.

Students on the MA Anthropological Research work closely with an expert supervisor in Social Anthropology, with further guidance from a second supervisor. All students attend the following core course units: Issues in Ethnographic Research I and II, Postgraduate Research Seminar, Independent Theoretical and Ethnographic Analysis I, and Introduction to Quantitative Methods. In consultation with their supervisor they also select three short, 5 credit modules in qualitative or quantitative research methods. Computer training is also available. Students then select two specialist course units, of which one must be within Social Anthropology (options vary from year to year) and one may be elsewhere in the University.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY
Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

Under the guidance of their supervisors, students are required to complete eight course units and a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation which is, in effect, a doctoral fieldwork research proposal. This is prepared over the summer period and presented in September. Most course units, including the postgraduate research seminar, are assessed by essays of up to 4,000 words. Some units also involve assessment of presentations and practical work.

Facilities

Social Anthropology, and the School of Social Sciences of which it is part, are based in a modern building which allows 24/7 access.
There is shared workspace available for research students within Social Anthropology including networked computers and printing facilities. There are also many work areas elsewhere in the building and in the University.

Career opportunities

In keeping with the main purpose of the MAAR as a research-training masters, many graduates successfully proceed to undertake PhD studies, whether in Manchester or elsewhere. The MAAR is also an excellent programme in which to acquire skills in social research methods, especially the ethnographic methods that are fast becoming popular in the business, voluntary and educational sectors as a way to find out about how people engage with their everyday worlds.

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Why choose this course. -You want to be taught by lecturers at the cutting edge of international research in social archaeology. -You enjoy working in small groups to explore current 'hot topics' and exciting new debates. Read more
Why choose this course:
-You want to be taught by lecturers at the cutting edge of international research in social archaeology
-You enjoy working in small groups to explore current 'hot topics' and exciting new debates
-You are looking for state-of-the art research training that will prepare you for a PhD and develop transferrable skills

Archaeology at Manchester is internationally recognised as a centre for social archaeology. The MA in Archaeology thus facilitates a fascinating journey into the material and social world of past human societies. By combining theory with practice, we are able to ask fundamental questions about the complex web of inter-relationships between societies, individuals, animals and plants, the built environment as well as the material world. This socially-focused approach also encourages a critical and self-reflective attitude towards the politics and practice of archaeology today. Working at the forefront of knowledge and interpretation, the MA brings together researchers of international calibre with specialization in a wide range of geographical areas and chronological periods, and thus offers a unique and stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

This MA programme fosters strong student-led research. By encouraging you to propose your own essay, presentation and dissertation topics, the MA allows you to pursue your specific archaeological interests throughout all our modules.

The MA in Archaeology will appeal to:
-Those wishing to explore the following themes: history, theory and practice of archaeology; the archaeology of cultural identity; landscape, monuments and architecture; technology and society; death and the body; archaeological heritage and the contemporary significance of the past.
-Those interested in the following geographical areas or chronological periods: Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Iron Age Britain, Neolithic and Bronze Age Near East, Cyprus and Greece, Africa, Pacific and historical/colonial archaeology, as well as the role of the past in contemporary societies.
-Those whose first degree was in a related discipline (eg Anthropology, Museology, History of Art, History) and now wish to take a postgraduate degree in Archaeology in order to gain a solid grounding in the discipline.
-Those who have a first degree in Archaeology (single or joint honours) who wish to advance their knowledge, understanding and skills in an exciting research led environment at the forefront of new developments and discoveries.

Aims

The Programme aims are to:
-Enable you to develop their understanding of the interrelationship between archaeological theory, interpretation and practice
-Provide you with an overview of a range of theoretical approaches to artefacts, architecture and landscape, and encourage you to explore these in relation to specific case studies
-Encourage you to develop their critical skills concerning inference and interpretation
-Encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the contemporary social and political context of archaeology
-Enhance and amplify previously acquired disciplinary and transferable skills
-Enable you to undertake self-critical original research (through the MA dissertation)

Coursework and assessment

In addition to the compulsory core module `Archaeologies of the Past, Present and Future', students take three option course units and complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation. Most teaching will take place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work. Assessment is both formative and summative. Most courses are summatively assessed by a 6,000-word essay. Oral presentations, poster presentations, self-reflective learning reports and assessed group work may also be used and additional formative feedback is given throughout.

Career opportunities

In addition to subject-specific content and approaches, this Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills that are appreciated by employers in all walks of life. Pursuing this degree thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. This MA provides an excellent vocational foundation for those wishing to pursue a career in archaeology or hoping to embark upon a research degree, but is also a great general degree that teaches a diverse range of transferable skills highly sought after by employers, such as critical thinking, oral presentation, and team work.

Recent graduates have gone on to PhDs in Archaeology, to working in Archaeological Units, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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Why you should choose this course. -You are interested in how global cultural and economic forces influence contemporary cities. -You want a course that crosses discplines and is accredited by leading institutions in architecture teaching and research. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You are interested in how global cultural and economic forces influence contemporary cities
-You want a course that crosses discplines and is accredited by leading institutions in architecture teaching and research
-You are looking to pursue a career in roles associated with the development of sustainable urban spaces

The MA in Architecture and Urbanism is a taught postgraduate course that conducts research into how global cultural and economic forces influence contemporary cities. The design, functioning and future of urban situations is explored in written, drawn and modelled work that builds on the legacy of twentieth century urban theory and is directed towards the development of sustainable cities.

This course is jointly accredited by the University of Manchester (UoM) and Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) with cross-disciplinary connections between the School of Environment, Education and Development (UoM), the Manchester School of Architecture (MMU) and Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MMU). This course can be approved as prior learning for the MSA RIBA Part 2 accredited MArch in certain circumstances.

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Why you should choose this course. -You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory. -You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory
-You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester
-You are interested in the rich museum and cultural scene of Manchester and the opportunities for case studies, fieldwork and networking on offer

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Course unit details

The AGMS MA is a modular degree with core and optional elements totalling to 180 credits. Core and options courses combine to make 120 credits with the remaining 60 credits allocated to the dissertation.

Semester one
Full-time students take two core course units: 'Introduction to Museum Studies' and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' (each 30 credits). Part-time students take 'Introduction to Museum Studies' in Year 1 and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' in Year 2. These core units are designed to introduce you to key issues and ideas in museum practice, and also to different approaches to the study and analysis of museums. All elements in Semester One are compulsory. Unit details are below.

Semester two
Semester two option courses build on the knowledge and understanding you have gained in semester one, and enable you to develop expertise in a particular disciplinary area of curating (e.g. art or archaeology) or sphere of museum practice (e.g. museum learning or exhibition development). Full-time students take 60 credits of option course units (option courses are offered as 15 or 30 credits). Part-time students take 30 credits of option course units each year. Unit details are below. Please note that not all option courses may be available every year. Students may choose to take one option course in a related subject area, e.g. Archaeology, History, or Social Anthropology.

Dissertation (Semester 2 and summer)
On successful completion of the coursework, you proceed to write a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic of your choice, agreed in conjunction with your dissertation supervisor. Dissertations, like articles (depending on the journal), may be strongly based on original primary source research, they might aim to re-interpret an already well-trawled area of the subject, or they might take up an approach somewhere between these two extremes. In all cases, however, the authors will have chosen and elaborated a body of relevant material which they bring to bear on a clearly defined issue. Dissertation planning and supervision takes place in Semester 2 (February - end of June) and you continue with your independent writing in July and August. You can either undertake a standard dissertation or a practice-based dissertation:
-Standard : 12-15,000 words
-Practice-based A : Exhibition. An exhibition, show or plan thereof. Outcome - exhibition and/or plan plus 8-10,000 words reflection
-Practice-based B : Policy. Student to develop a piece of museum policy. Outcome - policy or report plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.
-Practice-based C : Digital/Online (building on skills developed in Digital Curating). Outcome - digital media application plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.

Career opportunities

How will the AGMS support my career goals?
The AGMS is an important entry-level qualification for anyone seeking to pursue a career in museums or galleries. It is also a valuable resource for continuing professional development for mid-career professionals. In addition, the MA provides a thorough training in the skills needed to do further postgraduate research. These skills in research design and planning are transferable to jobs in the museum sector, as well as being a vital first step to PhD research.

What are the career destinations of AGMS graduates?
Of course, job destinations vary according to the interests, ambitions and skills of each individual, but most of our students are successful in obtaining professional posts in collections, exhibitions, education, interpretation, or some aspect of museum/arts management soon after completing the MA.

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Why you should choose this course?. -You would like a course combining key knowledge and skills in arts management and cultural policy with specialist options. Read more
Why you should choose this course?
-You would like a course combining key knowledge and skills in arts management and cultural policy with specialist options
-You are interested in a work placement at a cultural organisation near Manchester
-You would like to get a job at an arts organisation or festival around the world

Course description

The MA in Arts Management, Policy and Practice enables students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the history, theory and practice of arts management; to gain an insight into the range of professional opportunities in the creative and cultural sector; and to acquire direct experience of the many areas of arts management. The programme has a strong practical, hands-on element. At the same time it offers a solid theoretical grounding, exploring cultural policy in its historical context and encouraging critical engagement with the philosophical, political, social and economic imperatives informing contemporary practice. Above all, we aim to produce pioneers rather than bureaucrats.

Lecturers from the Centre for Arts Management teach the MA with considerable input from arts professionals including staff from the Martin Harris Centre, Contact Theatre, the Royal Exchange, Whitworth Art Gallery and many other local cultural organisations. We also work closely with our sister programme, the highly regarded MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies.

Aims

The programme is designed to serve as an entry-level qualification for recent graduates as well as offering professional development for mid-career practitioners. It offers flexibility and opportunities for specialisation, while ensuring a thorough grounding in essential principles and methodology. It provides a solid foundation for careers in different areas of the arts and creative industries, and caters for arts practitioners as well as aspiring managers.

Career opportunities

This programme prepares graduates for a diverse range of career opportunities as managers, administrators, policy-makers or practitioners in various branches of the arts and cultural and creative industries. Opportunities exist in the public, private, and voluntary sectors; in theatres, opera houses, concert halls, arts centres, museums and galleries, and the media; with orchestras, theatre companies, dance companies, etc.; or with the Arts Council, British Council, Local Authority, Tourist Board and various funding bodies. Discrete posts include: programming manager; marketing director; education director; development or outreach officer; tour organiser; promoter, agent or artist's manager; website, database or IT manager; producer; consultant or market researcher; fundraiser; community artist; freelance workshop leader. Graduates may also find work in related areas such as teaching, social and educational work. Some students go on to pursue further study and research at doctoral level.

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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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-You are interested in a challenging and stimulating career in conference interpreting. -You want personalised training from practising conference interpreters who are accredited by the European Union and the United Nations. Read more
-You are interested in a challenging and stimulating career in conference interpreting
-You want personalised training from practising conference interpreters who are accredited by the European Union and the United Nations
-You are looking for a course that is recognised and supported by key employers such as the European Commission and the European Parliament
-You want to benefit from four additional weeks of advanced simultaneous training after your final summer exams, which are specifically designed to prepare you for the profession
-You want to train and practice in state-of-the-art facilities using professional interpreting equipment

The MA in Conference Interpreting (MACINT) is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. All our interpreting trainers are practising conference interpreters in language combinations that reflect market demands. Most trainers are also AIIC members. For a detailed list of regular and visiting trainers and their professional backgrounds, please visit: http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/translation-and-intercultural-studies/about/people/external-trainers/

The programme offers simultaneous and consecutive interpreting training in five languages - French, German, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. These are key languages in international organisations such as the UN and EU and are also in demand on the freelance market.

The MA Conference Interpreting can be studied over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time). Part-time study is strongly supported and is actively facilitated in the timetabling of teaching hours for the MA, wherever possible. We also offer a Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Conference Interpreting for students who do not wish to complete a professional portfolio or research dissertation.

As a prospective student, you will offer one of two profiles, reflecting the two distinct profiles of practising conference interpreters:

-Profile 1: You have English as your native language (A language) and two passive foreign languages (C languages). You will be trained in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting out of both C languages into your A language

-Profile 2: You have Russian, Chinese, French, German or Spanish as your native language (A language) and English as an active foreign language (B language) or English as your A language and one of the five languages mentioned as your B. You will be trained in both types of interpreting in both directions (i.e. B-A and A-B)

Aims

-To equip students with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills for a career in conference interpreting
-To provide specialist training in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
-To provide a gradual transition into the professional world through practical, real-life interpreting tasks
-To provide guidance on professional conduct and ethics
-To enable students to reflect critically on their own and others' interpreting practice
-To equip students for further study and research

Teaching and learning

The MACINT degree is devised to train students with aptitude for Conference Interpreting in an intensive and highly individualised manner.

Contact hours with our trainers will involve a mixture of seminars with students studying all six languages on the MACINT degree (English, Chinese, French, German, Russian and Spanish) and language-specific tutorials focusing on your particular language combination. In the Professional Development for Conference Interpreters unit, students will also have the opportunity to work as part of a team of interpreters at a number of simulated multilingual conferences. Class sizes are small which allows for intensive contact with teaching staff.

Students are taught in separate classes for language tutorials covering each direction in which they interpret, for example, an interpreter working with French>
In addition to class contact hours, e-learning provision provides students with the support and feedback required between classes, as well as allowing them the possibility for tracking their progress. Guided self-study sessions in small groups are an essential part of the MACINT degree. These sessions also nurture peer assessment and feedback skills.

Career opportunities

The MA in Conference Interpreting at Manchester is recognised as a qualifying course for students wishing to be admitted for tests to work as simultaneous interpreters at international organisations, such as the UN and the EU. Some of our interpreter trainers have themselves helped to assess candidates for exams at international organisations, so we have a clear idea of what is required. Our own final exam marking criteria reflect those in use at international organisations.

The MA also prepares students for work as interpreters on the private market, i.e. in settings beyond international organisations. This can involve interpreting for businesses, think tanks, national and regional governments, NGOs, trade unions, legal firms and more. Our trainers have experience of working both in international organisations and on the private market so are well-placed to prepare students for all markets.

We maintain close links with key employers, giving students the opportunity to gain experience and receive external feedback on their performances during their training. For example, we have regular visits from senior staff interpreters at the European Commission. Some of our students have had opportunities to volunteer locally, for example our Chinese interpreting students volunteered during the recent visit of President Xi Jinping to Manchester.

The supply of English mother tongue interpreters is expected to fall further over coming years, due to the decline of language-learning in the UK. This will in turn increase the opportunities available for those native speakers who do have the necessary skills to work as simultaneous interpreters.

On the private market, all interpreters are increasingly expected to be able to interpret reliably into (as well as from) English. But employers cannot be expected to pay professional rates for second-rate English. The language immersion and opportunities for feedback that come with studying in small-group sessions, at a reputable UK-based course can help to develop the command of idiom and register, giving you the necessary edge on the job market.

A postgraduate qualification in Conference Interpreting also provides students with highly developed research, analytical and summarizing skills, excellent public speaking skills and an advanced understanding of mediation between cultures and languages. These transferable skills can be used in a variety of different job profiles.

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Why you should choose this course. -You would like to attend workshops by our leading novelists and poets. -You want to engage with and learn from practising writers, editors and agents. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You would like to attend workshops by our leading novelists and poets
-You want to engage with and learn from practising writers, editors and agents
-You are interested in internships with arts institutions in the surrounding region

The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials.

Writers may choose to work on writing a novel and/or short stories and/or poems.

All students will have the opportunity to attend weekly workshops and masterclasses taught by Professor Jeanette Winterson.

Please note that both the full and part-time options are taught between 9am to 5pm. We do not offer evening classes.

Coursework and assessment

Students take 60 credits worth of courses in semester one and 60 credits worth of courses in semester two. To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total;
-All poetry and fiction writing workshops meet for two hours per week, and are worth 30 credits. Students will also be offered three individual half-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing. Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio of poetry or fiction.
-Seminars also meet for two hours per week and are also worth 30 credits. They will usually be assessed by one 6,000 word essay or the equivalent.
-Over the summer students complete a 15,000 word 'dissertation' which consists of a group of poems, a selection or short stories, or an extract from a novel. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In semester one, students may choose to take two workshops - one in fiction writing and one in poetry -- or they may take one workshop and one seminar - typical seminars will be 'The Art of Short Fiction' and 'Poetics'.

In semester two students wishing to focus on poetry writing will take a poetry workshop and a seminar on Contemporary Poetry; students wishing to focus on fiction writing will take a fiction writing workshop and a seminar in Contemporary Fiction.

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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
Course description. The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more
Course description
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of healthcare and legal professionals and those in related fields. Students gain an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts.

Coursework and assessment
Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the two 30 credit Core course units. In addition, MA students must submit a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation by independent research (60 credits). The part-time MA students undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

The awards of the MA is classified according to Pass/Merit/Distinction.

PG Dip available upon enquiry

Course unit details
Students will be required to complete three Core course units and three Options. The Core course units are:
Philosophical Bioethics (30 credits)
Medico-Legal Problems (30 credits)
Global Health, Law and Bioethics (15 credits)
Students will then choose three Options.
MA students must also successfully complete a dissertation by independent research of 12,000-15,000 words (60 credits), which is undertaken over the summer months of the programme (June-September).

English language
Students whose first language is not English are required to hold one of the following English language qualifications:
- IELTS: minimum overall score of 7.0, with 7.0 in Writing and 6.5 in all other sub categories;
- TOEFL (Internet-Based Test): minimum overall score of 100, with 25 in Writing and 22 in all other sub categories;
- Cambridge Proficiency: minimum grade of C;
- Pearson English: minimum overall score of 66, with 66 in Writing and 59 in all other sub categories.

Fees
For entry in the academic year beginning September 2015, the tuition fees are as follows:
MA (full-time)
UK/EU students (per annum): £6,500
International students (per annum): £14,500
MA (part-time)
UK/EU students (per annum): £3,250
International students (per annum): £7,250

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Tourism and hospitality are expanding global industries resulting in an increased demand for skilled managers to lead and develop international organisations. Read more
Tourism and hospitality are expanding global industries resulting in an increased demand for skilled managers to lead and develop international organisations.

This course will equip you with the tools necessary to analyse the major influences affecting the international hospitality business environment, as well as a deep-rooted understanding of the issues currently shaping the management of international hospitality corporations.

The real-world assessments within this course will give you hands-on experience of planning and managing your own live projects, professional work within industry and live client consultancy. The course has been designed through close consultation with industry partners, to ensure you gain the latest practical and professional skills necessary to succeed within this sector.

Guest lectures and industry visits will enable you to develop a strong grasp of business culture, network and immerse yourself in these industries. The international nature of tourism and hospitality will be a key focus of your studies; this is reflected through our well-established global links. You will also have the opportunity to undertake a 36-48 week internship as part of your study.

Core Modules

It is intended that core business topics you will study will include:
Financial Management
Responsible Business
Creativity, Innovation and Enterprise
Leadership and Entrepreneurship
Methods of Enquiry
Developments in Strategic Management and Marketing
Dissertation or Strategic Live Project Management (option)
'Industry Live' - 150 hours of industry experience
Specialist units
In addition, you will also take specialist units:
Destination Management
Managing Hospitality Operations
International Tourism and Hospitality Management*
*including an optional international field trip to Budapest (additional fee applies). Opportunities to gain insights into the industry are also available in Manchester at no extra cost.

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University of Manchester School of Social Sciences
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
This is a standard route interdisciplinary MA programme focusing on human rights in a global context. There are four compulsory course units. Read more
This is a standard route interdisciplinary MA programme focusing on human rights in a global context.

There are four compulsory course units: Ethics in World Politics; Theories of Rights OR Human Rights Law; Human Rights in World Politics; and Dissertation Research Design. Students also take four optional course units from a wide range of relevant MA programmes.

Assessment is by class presentations, essays and 12-15,000 word dissertation.

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Our course encourages you to develop and work at the edge of new and evolving practices. Read more
Our course encourages you to develop and work at the edge of new and evolving practices. You will be invited to engage with fundamental issues in the theory of literature, producing original creative writing in prose, poetry, hybrid and experimental forms as you develop your personal practice through critical reflection.

Key benefits:

• Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus
• Develop a highly-innovative approach to creative writing
• Learn proven techniques for writing success from our team of award-winning authors.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/creative-writing-innovation-and-experiment

Suitable for

The course is for humanities graduates and/or experienced creative writers who are looking to challenge their conceptions of literature and develop their own practice in new ways. The course will also function as an introduction to further creative study at PhD level.

Programme details

The course will be of particular interest if you are a writer of fiction or poetry, but you will not be required to commit to either form.

You may also be interested in taking individual modules from the course syllabus on a pay-as-you-go basis. This way you could either build up to gaining the full qualification or study for your own enjoyment and/or professional development.

Format

Your own creative activity is the main driver for learning on this course. It is supported by regular workshops, lectures and seminars, personal tutorials, masterclasses with visiting writers and other activities such as event attendance.

Students on the full-time and part-time routes will study together and have additional opportunities to share and discuss work via the university’s virtual learning environment.

Module titles

• Theory, Text, Writing
• Writing Workshop
• Experimental Practice
• Literature in the Academic and Cultural World
• Dissertation: Creative Project

Assessment

You will be assessed through:

• Written assignments (creative, critical and reflective) (66%)
• Final creative project (34%)

Career Prospects

Previous graduates have gone onto further study and training and participated in literary culture through organizing literary competitions and publishing creative work in magazines. Two of the 2010-11 cohort are beginning PhDs in Creative Writing in 2011 (at the University of Northumbria and the University of Salford) and one is undertaking an internship at a local small press poetry publisher (The Knives Forks and Spoons Press).

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Intelligence and security issues are at the top of the political agenda following the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 and the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan. Read more
Intelligence and security issues are at the top of the political agenda following the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 and the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan. And the increased availability of intelligence material means that it is possible to place these issues within their historical context. This course is the longest-running non-governmental postgraduate course in the UK in the area of contemporary intelligence and security issues.

Key benefits:

• Ranked as ‘excellent’ by the Centre for Higher Education Development
• Delivered by experienced staff
• A pertinent and engaging subject with real-world relevance.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/intelligence-and-security-studies

Suitable for

This course is suitable if you are seeking to go into intelligence and security-related careers in the public and private sectors, as well as those already engaged in such professions who seek to enhance their career prospects through further qualifications. This course also provides excellent foundations for those who wish to pursue a PhD.

Programme details

The course comprises of one core module and several optional modules. You can exit the course after the second semester with a Postgraduate Diploma or progress to the Masters by completing the dissertation in semester 3.

Format

The course is taught through a combination of:

• lectures, supported by worksheets, videos, and directed reading
• seminars, which involve activities such as group discussions, case studies and presentations
• guest lectures
• conferences
• Personal supervision

Module titles

• Issues in Intelligence
• Intelligence and Conflict
• Security Networks, Intelligence and Internal Security
• The Secret State
• Digital Criminal Justice
• International Criminal Justice
• Middle East and Terrorism
• Dissertation

Assessment

Module performance is usually assessed by two essays of 3,500 words (50% each). In addition, MA students are required to submit a 14,000 word dissertation.

Career potential

You will develop a wide range of skills on the course (writing, communication, presentation and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, international or non-governmental organisations, think-tanks and research institutions. You can also pursue further study at doctoral level.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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This course has been designed to help you find challenging and rewarding work in journalism. During your time with us, you will learn the skills that you will need to become an incisive and thoughtful journalist. Read more
This course has been designed to help you find challenging and rewarding work in journalism. During your time with us, you will learn the skills that you will need to become an incisive and thoughtful journalist. As well as a general professional grounding in journalism, you will also be able to specialise in your second semester in print and online journalism, broadcast journalism or sports journalism, depending on which pathway you choose.

Upon graduation, you will receive a degree and NCTJ Diploma, both of which are essential if you want to find work in the UK news industry.

Key benefits:

• Study at our state-of-the-art MediaCityUK campus adjacent to the BBC and ITV
• Learn from lecturers with strong journalism backgrounds and undertake industry placements
• Receive a diploma from the National Council for Training of Journalists.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/journalism-news-broadcast-sport

Programme details

This is a highly intensive course and only for you if you are fully committed to becoming a working journalist, particularly in the UK. You will study modules closely aligned with the NCTJ syllabus so that you are also able to pass seven components of the NCTJ Diploma, such as Media Law and Reporting. During semester 1, you will study the basic skills of writing news in print, broadcast and online formats. These key skills are supported by study of media law and also ethical practice to encourage you to become a highly aware journalist. Intrinsic to this course are daily sessions of shorthand, a traditional skill still valued by the modern news industry, including broadcast organisations.

Format

The majority of the course is delivered largely through workshops and students are assessed mainly by coursework and projects, with some formal examinations.

Semester 1

• Law and Government for Journalists
• News and Ethics

Semester 2

• Multi-platform Journalism
• Sports Reporting
• Broadcast Journalism
• Community project

Semester 3

• Major Project (Print, Broadcast, Sport or Online)

Assessment

80% Workshops and 20% Lectures.

You will be able to sit NCTJ examinations at the end of semester 1 and also complete the NCTJ Portfolio during semester 2, when you will be encouraged to sit the NCTJ's shorthand exam and pass at 100 words per minute.

Career potential

Thanks to our strong links with the BBC, many of our graduates are now employed by the British public service broadcaster, working for news and sports output across radio, TV and online. Several of our students have secured the very competitive BBC news traineeships in recent years. Others have gone on to get positions with regional newspapers and news agencies, while some have entered public relations, where companies value the core journalistic qualification offered by the course.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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This course is your chance to refine your critical skills through analysis of the literature and language of the modern period. Read more
This course is your chance to refine your critical skills through analysis of the literature and language of the modern period. During your time with us, you’ll learn in a lively research environment and benefit from the University’s links with local cultural organisations, including the International Anthony Burgess Foundation.

Your studies will focus on key aspects of literary modernity and explore the interaction between literature and theory. The interdisciplinary nature of the course encourages and stimulates debate on cultural, political and historical issues, as well as analysing the relationships between literature and other cultural forms.

Key benefits:

• Study in a dynamic interdisciplinary research and teaching environment
• Draw upon the resources and expertise of cultural and literary institutions in the region
• Share your work with peers and academic staff at our Annual MA Conference.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/literature,-culture-and-modernity

Suitable for

Graduates in the humanities who want either a broad-based Master qualification or who are looking for a disciplined introduction to further study at a PhD level.

Programme details

MA Literature, Culture and Modernity helps you to acquire specific skills in a number of areas including critical thinking, research methods, cultural and literary theory, analysing literary and cultural texts in the context of debates on modernity.

You will develop your analytical and conceptual thinking skills and gain the expertise to focus on a specific research topic that interests you. During this course you will carry out advanced research and produce original and innovative studies.

Format

The syllabus consists of four taught modules, followed by a dissertation. You will select three option modules from a range which varies from year to year. Modules focus on nineteenth, twentieth and twenty first century literature and culture, exploring literature in relation to popular and working-class culture, analysing the interaction between literature, cinema and theory, and examining issues of identity, gender and power. You will also follow the core module Literary Research Practice which helps prepare for the dissertation and for further study.

Teaching for most modules takes place in weekly, two-hour seminars. Personal supervision is provided throughout the course and in support of the writing of the dissertation. The module Literary Research Practice is taught in three longer block sessions, with additional one-to-one supervisory sessions with a member of staff.

Semester 1

• Theory, Text and Writing
• Modernity and Cultural Form

Semester 2

• Literary Research Practise
• Anthony Burgess and his Contemporaries

Semester 3

• Dissertation

Assessment

You will be assessed through:

• Written and oral assignments (66%)
• Written dissertation(34%)

Career potential

Many graduates of this course have used it as part of their career development in areas as diverse as teaching, librarianship, media, publishing and the arts. Others use it as a means of access to PhD study or further research. You will develop a wide range of skills on this course (writing, communication, presentation and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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