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Full Time MA Degrees in London, United Kingdom

We have 1,096 Full Time MA Degrees in London, United Kingdom

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The Advanced Educational Practice MA enables participants working in educational settings to reflect on their own practice, taking a professional academic approach. The programme's presentation is either fully online for individual students or a combination of online and face-to-face for those joining an MA school-based cohort group (minimum of 12 participants). Read more

The Advanced Educational Practice MA enables participants working in educational settings to reflect on their own practice, taking a professional academic approach. The programme's presentation is either fully online for individual students or a combination of online and face-to-face for those joining an MA school-based cohort group (minimum of 12 participants).

About this degree

The programme has been developed to respond to educational practitioner needs in both UK and International settings. Its field of study is pedagogical practice examined through the different lenses of the learner, the curriculum and action research. Learning is presented through using the community of practice as a tool to share and enhance understanding.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three optional (or compatible) modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or four optional modules (120 credits) and a report (30 credits).

The PG Diploma is awarded for 120 credits in any available modules.

The PG Certificate is awarded for 60 credits in any available modules.

Core modules

There is only one true core module for the Advanced Educational Practice MA which is a research methodology module, usually completed before or alongside the dissertation or report thesis. 

  • The Action Researcher: exploring issues and contexts

Optional modules

Students are encouraged to identify a theme to study compatible optional modules which can be taken from the list below. Other UCL Institute of Education Master's-level modules may be available also at the discretion of the Module Leader and the Advanced Educational Practice Programme Leader. 

  • Developing Mentoring Practices
  • Independent Study Module
  • Supporting Learners and Learning
  • Teacher as Author: curriculum design and development
  • Assessing Colleagues' Learning
  • Developing the Role of the Tutor
  • Participants may also bring 60 credits into this MA from successful completion of a PGCE (Primary, Secondary or Post-Compulsory routes).

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates either in a report of 10,000 words (30 credits) or a dissertation of 20,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning

All modules are taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. All participants are assessed through coursework (which may be a long essay, portfolio or presentation) at the end of each module and receive both formative written assessment on a draft and summative written assessment following final submission.

Fieldwork

Some modules have an expectation that participants will carry out an inquiry or project in their educational setting. This can be as a volunteer but the team do not make placements or arrange field opportunities.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Advanced Educational Practice MA

Careers

The majority of students on this programme are already in employment, normally in educational settings. It is expected that study on the programme will open up opportunities either for promotion within the student's current place of employment, or enable them to apply for new roles within an educational setting.

Employability

The programme is designed to empower students as education practitioners through development of transferable academic skills in practitioner research and engagement with literature.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Through an established virtual learning environment, participants follow directed tasks including reading, video and audio clips and full lectures presented by IOE academics. Responses are then shared with the online community and participants are encouraged to respond to each other.

Participants are supported in exploring their practice through engagement with research including academic and professional literature, so examining updated knowledge about theories and practices in education.

The study is expected to support the everyday educational practices participants are involved in.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Curriculum, Pedagogy & Assessment

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA is widely recognised as one of the most significant and innovative courses in its field. Unlike most courses on art theory, this programme grounds its problems and concepts in the appropriate philosophical context. Read more
This MA is widely recognised as one of the most significant and innovative courses in its field. Unlike most courses on art theory, this programme grounds its problems and concepts in the appropriate philosophical context. It will prepare you for a wide range of careers in the arts, education and public policy – it is particularly highly regarded in the arts. It also provides an ideal preparation for doctoral research across the humanities and social sciences.

Key features
-You will benefit from high levels of staff-student contact, including individual tutorials, from versatile and internationally recognised teaching staff with a range of interests, projects and publications.
-You will be part of a large, supportive community, studying with committed and engaged peers.
-The course is based at the UK's leading Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, which organises conferences, workshops and regular research seminars.

What will you study?

This programme combines a grounding in philosophical aesthetics in the modern European tradition with study of contemporary art theory and the philosophy of art history. Canonical authors studied include Adorno, Derrida, de Duve, Duchamp, Greenberg, Heidegger, Kant and Merleau-Ponty. You will engage with some of the most influential texts in modern and contemporary art theory - from Kant and Schiller via Greenberg and Adorno to Rancière and Deleuze - framed in terms of fundamental conceptual problems inherited from the German Idealists. You will also gain a clear overview of philosophical approaches to modern art, distinguishing between ‘aesthetic', ‘Romantic' and ‘Modernist' problematics. You may also choose from a range of option modules from the Modern European Philosophy and Philosophy & Contemporary Critical Theory MA courses.

Assessment

Coursework (including short exercises), essays and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Research areas

This course is taught by internationally recognised specialists at the dynamic Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy.
Since its inception in 1994, the CRMEP has developed a national and international reputation for teaching and research in the field of post-Kantian European philosophy, characterised by a strong emphasis on broad cultural and intellectual contexts and a distinctive sense of social and political engagement. In each of the last two research assessment exercises, RAE 2008 and REF2014, 65% of the research activities of the CRMEP were judged 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent', with 25% of its outputs for REF2014 judged 'world-leading'.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Kant and the Aesthetic Tradition - Delivered and assessed in English
-Philosophy Dissertation

Optional modules
-Art Theory: Modernism, Avant-Garde, Contemporary - delivered and assessed in English
-Contemporary European Philosophies - delivered and assessed in English
-Critique, Practice, Power
-Hegel and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-Kant and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-Nietzsche and Heidegger - delivered and assessed in English
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
-Philosophy of Art History
-Political Philosophy
-Recent French Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English
-Recent Italian Philosophy
-Topics in Modern European Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of four distinct pathways. Read more

The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of four distinct pathways. In the African Studies with Education MA students will come to understand some of the challenges surrounding education in contemporary Africa - including poverty, inequality, gender, education and employment, education and technology; vernacular education and the diaspora.

About this degree

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present. In addition, the Education pathway explores aspects of education and learning, through a bespoke 'African Studies and Education' core module and a range of advanced optional modules drawn from the UCL Institute of Education and other UCL departments. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
  • Debating Africa's Future
  • African Studies and Education

Optional modules

Students choose three from a range of optional modules including but not limited to the following:

  • Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
  • Planning for Education and Development
  • Education, Conflict and Fragility
  • Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
  • Education in Muslim Communities
  • Gender, Education and Development
  • Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation
  • Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
  • Cultural Memory and Identity
  • Research Methods in African Studies
  • Performance, Visual Media and Popular Culture in Africa
  • Archaeology and Education

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words. This dissertation must focus on a research question related to educational issues in or about Africa.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: African Studies with Education MA

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up diverse positions within education-related organisations, national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, or within national ministries and the public sector. 

Employability

Students will develop skills in a wide range of areas related to education in Africa, including theoretical and practical concepts concerning the challenges of researching and delivering education in Africa. Graduates will be well placed to go on to jobs in the enducation, NGO or policy sphere. Students will also have the option to choose a research methods module which will introduce them to transferable skills, including research ethics, participatory research skills, data analysis and GIS, archival work, ethnographic field techniques and presentation skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study education as it relates to the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent. This expertise is combined with that of the world-leading UCL Institute of Education to provide unparalleled insight into education policy and practice.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree. The new African Studies and Education pathway has been co-developed with the UCL Institute of Education and draws on the university's core strengths in teaching and reseach on education in Africa.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more

The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

About this degree

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
  • Debating Africa's Future
  • Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules

African Studies own optional module 'African Heritage' is particularly recommended. This module runs each year. Please note that options from other departments may or may not be available in any given academic year.

  • Students choose three from a range of options including the following:
  • Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Archaeology and Education
  • Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
  • Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
  • Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
  • Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
  • Managing Archaeological Sites
  • Managing Museums
  • Museum and Site Interpretation
  • African Heritage

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words. This dissertation must focus on a question relating to heritage in Africa.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: African Studies with Heritage MA

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability

Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Develop your knowledge and understanding of the experience of ageing societies and policies for an ageing world in our course. Ideal for social scientists, our course offers outstanding flexibility, with two pathways of study available. Read more

Develop your knowledge and understanding of the experience of ageing societies and policies for an ageing world in our course. Ideal for social scientists, our course offers outstanding flexibility, with two pathways of study available: the MSc pathway focuses on quantitative research methods and data analysis while the MA concentrates on qualitative research methods and analysis. Join one of the leading centres for the study of ageing and later life worldwide.

Key benefits

  • Taught by faculty in the Institute of Gerontology, one of the leading centres for the study of ageing. The Institute is located in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, a unique, research-led interdisciplinary social science department directed by internationally recognised scholars.
  • Offers a highly flexible study programme, drawing on a broad range of professional and disciplinary expertise and experience from geriatrics, demography, sociology and policy analysis.
  • Provides close links with, and regular speakers from, social policy and healthcare fields, providing insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of these areas as they affect ageing and older people.
  • Provides an awareness of national, crossnational and comparative perspectives of ageing populations, the ageing process and older people in society.
  • Located in the heart of London.
  • Provides education at the cutting edge of current research into ageing and later life, through taught modules and original research.

Description

The Ageing & Society course offers you great flexibility, with the choice to study either full or part-time and two pathways of study available; one channel focuses on quantitative research methods and data analysis while the other concentrates on qualitative research and data analysis. You will study the module Population, Ageing & Policy, plus a range of required and optional modules depending on your choice of pathway.

The MA, MSc pathway requires modules with a minimum total of 180 credits and a maximum of 185 credits to complete the course, with 60 credits coming from a dissertation of around 10,000-12,000 words.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying for the MA, MSc qualification part-time, your course will take two years to complete; you will be expected to take Population Ageing & Policy, Designing Quantitative Research and a 15-20 credit optional module in year one, with the remaining modules taken in year two.

Course purpose

While it is broadly aimed at social scientists, students include those in the social and natural sciences, management, policy and politics, law, and humanities as well as those from other disciplines such as allied health and social care professionals including nurses, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, dietitians and others fro health backgrounds.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 15-credit module:

Lectures, seminars and feedback: The total contact time for each 15-credit taught module is 10-15 hours. These sessions will include lectures, teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study.

Self-study: Each 15-credit taught module has approximately 135 hours of self-guided learning time.

Dissertation module: You will receive three dissertation workshops that are each two hours long plus six additional 30 minute one-toone dissertation supervision and group consultations.

Self-study: Approximately 591 hours.

Assessment

The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of essays, written examinations and oral presentations. The MA, MSc study programme also requires a 10-12,000 word supervised dissertation on the subject of ageing and society.

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to pursue of a range of careers including strategic positions in government, policy, voluntary and non-governmental organisations, as well as consultant positions in geriatric medicine and psychiatry and specialist healthcare roles with older people.



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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. Read more
This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. We offer units on periods from Near Eastern History to the Byzantine Empire and a vast range of methodologies are deployed and sources considered.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of fascinating subjects. You will study from an exciting menu of units which covers not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maancienthistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Classics & Philosophy Department at Royal Holloway is a thriving and internationally recognised research centre.

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Research in the Department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire

- In Ancient History, we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: the history of Greek law, Athenian political and social history, the Roman army, ancient shipping and shipsheds, and ancient urbanism, and both Greek and Latin epigraphy.

Course content and structure

Students study one core unit and two elective course units, and prepare a dissertation. At least one of the elective units should be in Ancient History, as should the dissertation. Courses available cover a range of subjects from ancient Greece and Rome to Egypt, as well as offering skills in language acquisition and epigraphy. For more information about the course units please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of ancient history

-an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

a critical awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics/ancient history related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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University College London Department of History
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The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more

The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

About this degree

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules

Optional modules will be finalised in Spring 2018. Please contact the department for more information. The following optional modules were available in 2017/18 and this is an indicative list only:

  • Babylon under Imperial Rule, 539-c. 50 BC
  • Hellenistic Encounters with Egypt
  • The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
  • Lived Ancient Religion in Hellenistic Greece
  • Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
  • Greek and Latin language at various levels
  • Propaganda and Ideology in Ancient Rome
  • Hellenistic Epigraphy
  • Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
  • Continuity and Change in the Ancient Near East
  • Classical Chinese Medicine
  • Persepolis (King's College London)
  • Roman Britain (King's College London)

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in the field of ancient history, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held at other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ancient History MA

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Communications Intern, Terra Firma
  • PhD in Ancient History, UCL
  • Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)
  • Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police

Employability

Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Our. MA Animation course. builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. Read more

Our MA Animation course builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. We offer a dynamic environment in which you'll be able to engage with the animated form in traditional 2D and 3D stop motion, as well as the theoretical aspects of the discipline.

This course attracts students from around the world and has a rich cultural mix. You'll approach animation as a broad discipline and be encouraged to engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making through a range of projects, which will culminate in the production of a high quality animated film.

MA Animation at our Farnham campus has a long history of nurturing creative, innovative and challenging animators and has an incomparable alumni. This course will support you in developing practical skills while fostering a high standard of diverse critical approaches.

On this course you'll be encouraged to take risks, explore and develop your interests, and exchange, debate and discuss your ideas. You'll be expected to produce original and exciting films during your time with us, and explore the wide range of creative possibilities of frame-by -frame filmmaking. We'll encourage you to be open to these possibilities and to develop new skills, as well as building on your existing ones.

Your studies will be supported by internationally renowned staff on a course that is proud to have no house style. We'll encourage you to explore your own natural inclinations - whether narrative, experimental, documentary or fiction. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework.

Our course uses a wide range of technical resources that cover the whole spectrum of contemporary animation practice, from traditional drawn and stop motion animation to the latest digitally generated imagery.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Wednesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

Our course actively encourages you to gain industry experience through a wide variety of approaches. These include work experience, internships, studio visits, commissions and competitions and entry into major film festivals.

We've built an extensive network of industry connections, giving us access to high-profile visiting lecturers, and to commissions, competitions and exciting work placement opportunities.

Our industry links include:

-Aardman Animations

-STUDIO AKA

-Passion Pictures

-Mackinnon & Saunders

-Nexus

-Framestore

-Cinesite

-The Mill

-ustwo

-Stylorouge

-Blink Productions

-ITV.

Careers

Animation is one of the most significant and rapidly expanding media fields. An enormous range of career opportunities exist in animation. These range from the traditional techniques of animation storytelling, drawn to model and CGI animation.

Typical careers in the industry include:

-Directors

-Producers

-Animators (in commercials, films, broadcast, online media and games)

-Editors

-Character designers

-Production designers

-Pre-vis artists

-Compositors

-Storyboard artists

-Post-production.

As one of the pre-eminent animation courses in the world, our sought after alumni have landed many exciting, high-profile roles across the industry - including positions as:

-Animators

-Directors

-Producers

-Designers

-Model makers

-Storyboard artists

-CG animators

-CG riggers.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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Royal College of Art School of Communication
Distance from London: 0 miles
The Animation programme is a world leader in practice and research, with a commitment to broadening the understanding of our complex discipline. Read more

The Animation programme is a world leader in practice and research, with a commitment to broadening the understanding of our complex discipline. Established over 30 years ago, the programme has an international reputation that places it at the forefront of the discipline. Within the programme there are three distinct pathways: Documentary AnimationExperimental Animation and Narrative Animation, one of which students select as part of their application.

The programme’s location within a visually sophisticated, multidisciplinary art and design school, rather than a film school, is crucial in the development of creative and critical thinking, research skills and expanded discipline expertise that’s applied to ideas, styles, genres and technological approaches. Both the MA and research degrees attract artists and makers from a broad background of disciplines: science, maths, architecture, literature, art history, computing and fine art, as well as communication.

We offer a unique learning and teaching environment, developing the creativity and skills required in an age of rapid cultural and technological change. Our students contribute to this expanding and maturing field of moving image, with core skills centred around directing, narrative and production. We offer an exceptionally stimulating multidisciplinary environment, complemented by the College’s award-winning programmes in art and design. The curriculum allows students to explore the creative slip between diverse forms of moving image: animation, documentary, fiction, process and interactivity. Through innovative, practical research and an understanding of different contexts, traditions and histories, students learn through a potent combination of workshops, lectures and tutorials, while developing their own practice, individually and collaboratively.

Leading practitioners on the programme bring a wide range of practice and research, their excellence of teaching supported by a wide variety of visiting established filmmakers/artists of international reputation. Recent visiting artists have included Stephen Quay, Suzan Pitt, David O’Reilly, John Smith, Nina Sabnani, Hiraki Sawa, Peter Blegvad, Asif Kapadia, Philip Hunt, Nick Park and Jonathan Hodgson.

The Animation programme has a world-leading research environment, attracting funding from, among others, the Arts & Humanities Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, and the Medical Research Council. 

Students are encouraged to develop a critical discourse around their subject, as well as building on and challenging notions within their own personal areas of interest or specialism. The programme has an ongoing relationship with the most successful and innovative sectors of the UK animation industry – Blink, Nexus, Studio AKA, Passion Pictures and Hornet – which allows students’ work to be placed within a wider professional context.

The programme offers excellent facilities supported by knowledgeable technical staff, including shooting studios for stop-frame/green screen, sound recording/mixing, digital and film cameras/editing, Cintiqs and an individual desk space for each student in mixed studios within the School of Communication.

The MA programme and research degrees offer a holistic environment that prepares animation artists for a number of roles within gallery- and industry-based animated filmmaking, and provides innovators to the animation professions. 

Current students and graduates continue to have a ‘real-world’ impact on animation, pushing the forefront of the practice and producing innovative and highly accomplished work. Much of this has been demonstrated through the accolades bestowed on the programme, as well as by individual student achievement through winning awards such as 5 BAFTAs, the Royal Television Society, the Adobe Achievement Award, and Jerwood Moving Image Drawing Prizes. Exhibitions in museums and galleries worldwide, together with film screenings at festivals and broadcast licenses with television and Internet channels, allow students to increases their professional profile.



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Fusing Goldsmiths' academic excellence and professional training from the Horniman Museum, the MA in Anthropology & Museum Practice provides you with a uniquely comprehensive set of skills. Read more

Fusing Goldsmiths' academic excellence and professional training from the Horniman Museum, the MA in Anthropology & Museum Practice provides you with a uniquely comprehensive set of skills.

This degree draws on expertise in the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths, in partnership with The Horniman Museum and Gardens, to deliver a unique opportunity to develop both your academic knowledge and practical professional skills.

Whether you're a mid-career professional looking to expand your subject expertise in anthropology, or an anthropologist looking to move into the museum sector, the course will provide you with the skills and knowledge required to be a confident, knowledgeable and professional practitioner in the anthropology and museum sector.

The Horniman Museum and Gardens

Goldsmiths' partnership with the Horniman provides a unique opportunity to gain practical skills from museum professionals working with a world-renowned anthropology collection. The collection is currently undergoing a major redisplay involving an extensive three-year development of the museum's gallery spaces. This exciting project is due to be completed in spring 2018, allowing students to learn from the transformation and the extensive collection of artefacts.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Charlotte Joy

Modules & structure

You'll study the following modules:

Optional module/s (30 credits)

You have the opportunity to tailor your studies and gain further specialist knowledge through your own choice of either one or two optional modules. These can be chosen from the wide range of options offered by departments across Goldsmiths, or from another University of London institution.

If you haven’t studied anthropology previously, you’ll also have the opportunity to audit the Masters-level Introduction to Social Anthropology module, which will enable you to hit the ground running with a solid grounding in the subject.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked: 1st in the UK for effective teaching* 6th in the UK for the quality of our research** 30th in the world for this subject area***

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Find out more about the Department of Anthropology.

*Guardian University Guide League Tables 2017

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

***QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017

Skills & careers

This course provides you with a unique opportunity to develop both your academic and practical skills in anthroplogy and museum practice. This combination will provide you with an excellent grounding for a career in museum and anthropology work. This could include roles such as:

  • Curator
  • Community education
  • Outreach
  • Exhibitions officer


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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more

The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors.

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

  • How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
  • How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
  • If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
  • What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
  • If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
  • How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

Modules & structure

The MA is made up of:

  • Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
  • Anthropological Theory (30 credits)
  • Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & Communications, Politics, or Sociology] (60 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

*Students who have a first degree in anthropology can replace Anthropological Theory with an additional option module.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Download the programme specification, relating to the 2017-18 intake. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked: 1st in the UK for effective teaching* 6th in the UK for the quality of our research** 30th in the world for this subject area***

Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Find out more about the Department of Anthropology.

*Guardian University Guide League Tables 2017

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

***QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017

Skills & careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology. Read more

Professionally validated by the National Youth Agency, this programme brings together community development and youth work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of anthropology.

This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. It is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in youth and community work and who need a professional qualification. 

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines.

Established in 1992, it is the first of three pathways, with an additional MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Development launched in 2012 and an MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts launched in 2015. The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students.

Modules & structure

The MA combines an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments with practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other and spend some of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies

The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the autumn it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to youth and community work, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities and young people, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the three fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails a total of 400 hours. This is divided between 20 hours of observations and 380 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The accompanying teaching is divided into three modules.

  • Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (80 hours practice) In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying youth work and community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.
  • Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (150 hours practice) In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development and youth work practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’.
  • Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (150 hours practice plus twenty hours observations) This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community and youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form.

The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations. Overall, at least 200 hours of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 11 - 25 year age group.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development. Read more

This is a pathway of the MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work, aimed both at international applicants who may not need a British National Youth Agency qualification and those who want to become specialists in community development.

This MA is a second pathway to the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community and Youth Work. It was launched in 2012 as an option for international or home students who do not need an National Youth Agency qualification and for those who want to specialise in community development. A third pathway, the MA in Applied Anthropology and Community Arts started in 2015.

The three pathways entail different placements but are taught together, providing much opportunity for exchange of ideas and collaboration amongst students. 

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Pauline von Hellerman

Modules & structure

The MA consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience.

Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students).

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies.

Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

 The Department of Anthropology teaches two of the core components of your degree: Contemporary Social Issues and Anthropological Research Methods.

  • The Contemporary Social Issues module runs through the Autumn Term and Spring Term, with lectures and student-led seminars alternating on a weekly basis. In the Autumn Term it explores key analytical concepts in anthropology and related social sciences relevant to community development, such as class, gender, race and culture. The Spring Term addresses more specific contemporary social issues affecting communities, such as transnationalism, mental health, gentrification and new media. The module is assessed by a take-home exam in May.
  • Anthropological Research Methods is taught in the Spring Term. Here, you will become familiar with ethnographic research and writing. Through literature and practical research exercises (five days of fieldwork is attached to this module), you will learn about different methods of data collection including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

In addition we strongly encourage all students, in particular those without a background in anthropology, to sit in on other MA option courses offered by the anthropology department, such as Anthropological Theory, Anthropology of Development, Anthropology of Violence, Anthropology of Art and Anthropology and the Environment.

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies runs the fieldwork modules, which involve placements that, are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

This MA pathway entails 20 hours of observations and 280 hours of placements, consisting of three placements with at least two different organisations. The fieldwork and accompanying teaching is divided into three modules:

Fieldwork I: Perspectives and Approaches (Placement 1 –70 hours) 

In this module you explore key themes, principles, values and competing perspectives underlying community development. The value of experiential learning approaches and critical pedagogy in informal learning and community development are explored alongside group work principles, processes and theories. You consider your own values and reflect on your practice perspective.

Fieldwork 2: Critical Practice (Placement 2 –70 hours) 

In this module you critically analyse the changing context of community development practice, develop as critically reflective practitioners and learn how to recognise and challenge discrimination and oppression. Key themes include ethical dilemmas faced in practice, youth participation and methods of engaging communities with a view to facilitating ‘empowerment’. 

Fieldwork 3: Management, Enterprise and Development (Placement 3 – 140 hours plus 20 hours observation) 

This module advances critical understanding of the management of projects, staff and resources, the legal context of community development and community & youth work, how to produce funding bids, prepare budgets and grapple with the issues and processes involved in developing a social enterprise as well as monitoring and evaluation. 

All three modules are currently assessed by an essay, documents completed by the student in relation to the placement and community development national occupational standards learning, a report by the placement supervisor and a fieldwork contract form. The final placement also involves an assessment of the observations.

Skills & careers

Increasing employment prospects are central to this programme.

Our graduates find work directly or indirectly related to the disciplines relatively quickly after graduating, or even while on the programme. The majority of our students gain work in youth work or community work. Examples of recent graduate employment include:

  • Full-time health youth worker for a London Borough, leading on LGBTQ awareness and homophobic bullying
  • Community Centre based youth worker
  • Mentoring and Befriending Co-ordinator at a civil society equalities organisation
  • Community Development Worker in a social work team in Hong Kong

Some seek and gain work in a wide range of other settings, often shaped by the particular interests that they develop during their time with us, such as working with refugees or with disability groups. Others join social enterprises to bid for contracts, join newly developing cooperatives or established NGOs in the UK and abroad.



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