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Full Time MA Degrees in Computer Science, London, United Kingdom

We have 14 Full Time MA Degrees in Computer Science, London, United Kingdom

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This course will enable students with some experience of 3D computer graphics to develop and enhance their abilities in the skills required by the computer animation and visual effects industries. Read more
This course will enable students with some experience of 3D computer graphics to develop and enhance their abilities in the skills required by the computer animation and visual effects industries. It is one of a suite of digital media courses that enable you to study professional digital media practice in a studio environment and work as part of an interdisciplinary team with students from across the full programme. Through a student-centred project-based curriculum, you work to develop specialist skills such as character animation, character rigging, effects animation, modelling, texturing and lighting.

Key features
-This course has been developed in consultation with our industry panel, which includes representatives from Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, DreamWorks and Samsung Design Europe. We are also an active member of TIGA, the games industry's representative body, and the British Interactive Media Association (BIMA).
-The courses have a project-based curriculum where collaborative interdisciplinary teamwork is encouraged.
-The industry-focused learning experience enables you to hone your specialist skills in a professional context. Work placements, real projects, internships and an industry mentoring scheme will also prepare you for entry into the fast-growing and highly competitive digital media arena.

What will you study?

You will learn clean modelling techniques, principles of animation, lighting, shading, texturing, rendering and compositing. You will create computer animation assets, both alone and in teams, using industry-standard production techniques that stimulate a professional environment of collaboration to deliver a product on time. You will also work as part of a team comprising students from different media disciplines, undertaking projects that have previously included use of brain–computer interface systems, computer vision and optical stereoscopic 3D, and you will learn how to present yourself to potential employers through your professional presence and portfolio.

Assessment

Development of a portfolio of computer graphic work (including 3D assets, textures and animations), presentations, essays.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.
-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Creation and Animation
-Perfecting the Look
-Digital Studio Practice
-Media Specialist Practice
-Digital Media Final Project

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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more
This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

Degree information

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (15 credits each), three optional modules (15 credits each), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement. A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), nine months full-time or flexible study up to 5 years is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years is offered.

Core modules
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Internet Technologies
-Introduction to Programming and Scripting
-Server Programming and Structured Data
-XML

Optional modules - students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following:
-Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities
-Affective Interaction
-Computer Music
-Design Practice
-Electronic Publishing
-Fundamentals of Information Science
-Geographical Information Systems
-Historical Bibliography
-Interaction Design
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Introduction to Digitisation
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
-Manuscript Studies
-Multimedia Computing
-User-Centred Evaluation Methods

Dissertation/report
All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercices, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement
Students undertake a work placement. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum, National Theatre, British Library, Marx Memorial Library, Islington Museum, Ubiquity Press, UCL Communications, and UCL Art Museum.

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, Knowledge 4 All Foundation; in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Producer, Kaldor Group
-Software Engineer, Semcat
-Librarian, University of Crete
-Digital Project Manager, Knowledge 4 All Foundation (K4A)
-Technical Operations Manger, Kaldor

Employability
The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lecturers drawn from experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum, National Theatre, British Library, Marx Memorial Library, Islington Museum, Ubiquity Press, UCL Communications, and UCL Art Museum.

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This course, one of a suite of digital media courses, enables you to study professional digital media practice in a microstudio environment with a focus on the design skills necessary for the field of games development. Read more
This course, one of a suite of digital media courses, enables you to study professional digital media practice in a microstudio environment with a focus on the design skills necessary for the field of games development. Through a student-centred project-based curriculum, you work as a games designer to develop your specialist skills while working as part of an interdisciplinary team with students from across the full programme.

-This course has been developed in consultation with our industry panel, which includes representatives from Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, DreamWorks and Samsung Design Europe. We are also an active member of TIGA, the games industry's representative body, and the British Interactive Media Association (BIMA).
-This course has been designed to utilise the best digital media expertise and resources from across the University, and will prepare you for employment in the digital media industry, where teams of specialists work together to develop and author innovative digital media projects.

What will you study?

Students on both courses will design and create computer games, alone and in teams, using industry-standard production management tools and techniques that stimulate a professional environment of collaboration to deliver a product on time. You will also develop vertical-slice prototypes using new technologies, such as computer vision and stereoscopy, and will learn how to present yourself to potential employers through your professional presence and portfolio.

Assessment

Vertical slices, prototypes, demos, videos, presentations, design documents, essays.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

PlayStation First

Kingston University is an educational partner of Sony through PlayStation First.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Digital Studio Practice
-Media Specialist Practice
-Game Design
-User Experience Design (Content)
-Digital Media Final Project

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Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. Read more
Imaginative, original and full of exciting ideas - if this sounds like you, then our MSc in Creative Technology could be your perfect course. It's open to students from any background who are interested in combining technical and creative skills to create the technologies and experiences of the future. We'll give you the opportunity to learn about and experiment with different types of technology and use them to design and develop your own inventions.


Why study MA/MSc Creative Technology at Middlesex?

Technology is becoming increasingly important to art, design and culture and the skills associated with the once-separate creative and technical worlds overlap more and more. We welcome students from any background onto this course– it's an unusual opportunity for students with diverse skills to work together, and it's this variety that gives it so much character.

This is a highly practical course, assessed entirely through project work, with an emphasis on collaboration and experimentation. We want you to benefit from our creative, academic and technical expertise, and we like nothing more than to see you step out of your comfort zone and tackle something new. You'll work with your peers on group projects – recent students have made an interactive cushion, explored Kinect hacking, created apps and designed an interactive breakfast table that showed the news.

Never mind thinking outside the box – you'll be inventing 1,001 new things to do with it.

Course highlights

- All our staff are active in research, industry or both and are passionate about new technology and new ways to use it. Particular areas of expertise include music and sound technology, social media, interactive and haptic technology, visual and digital imagery and gaming.
- Our tutors, who come from both the School of Media and Performing Arts and the School of Science and Technology, include haptic technology specialist Dr Rui Loureiro, who has pioneered work in robot-aided stroke rehabilitation; Debbie Jedwab, a former set designer for the BBC; composer and sound artist Nye Parry, who has worked with the British Museum and the Science Museum; and multimedia artist Nic Sandiland, whose work has been shown worldwide.
- You'll also benefit from the cutting-edge facilities and equipment in our £80 million Art, Design and Media building, the equal of which is rarely seen in other UK universities. They include fully-equipped TV, radio and sound studios, workshops for digital image processing and a comprehensive digital publishing suite.
- You'll learn computer programming as part of the course, and will have access to cutting edge haptic technology and a graphics and games programming laboratory. The university is home to the Human Interactive Systems Laboratory, a centre of research into haptic technology, and the Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts.
- As well as attending masterclasses and guest lectures by industry professionals, students often work on real industry briefs – they've recently worked with Sony and designer and engineer Moritz Waldemeyer. We've developed the course in consultation with advisors from the creative industries to ensure it's relevant and current.

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Our. MA Animation course. builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. Read more

Our MA Animation course builds on our long history of providing highly regarded animation education at UCA Farnham, and will provide you with a strong interdisciplinary approach to the animated form. We offer a dynamic environment in which you'll be able to engage with the animated form in traditional 2D and 3D stop motion, as well as the theoretical aspects of the discipline.

This course attracts students from around the world and has a rich cultural mix. You'll approach animation as a broad discipline and be encouraged to engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making through a range of projects, which will culminate in the production of a high quality animated film.

MA Animation at our Farnham campus has a long history of nurturing creative, innovative and challenging animators and has an incomparable alumni. This course will support you in developing practical skills while fostering a high standard of diverse critical approaches.

On this course you'll be encouraged to take risks, explore and develop your interests, and exchange, debate and discuss your ideas. You'll be expected to produce original and exciting films during your time with us, and explore the wide range of creative possibilities of frame-by -frame filmmaking. We'll encourage you to be open to these possibilities and to develop new skills, as well as building on your existing ones.

Your studies will be supported by internationally renowned staff on a course that is proud to have no house style. We'll encourage you to explore your own natural inclinations - whether narrative, experimental, documentary or fiction. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework.

Our course uses a wide range of technical resources that cover the whole spectrum of contemporary animation practice, from traditional drawn and stop motion animation to the latest digitally generated imagery.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Wednesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

Our course actively encourages you to gain industry experience through a wide variety of approaches. These include work experience, internships, studio visits, commissions and competitions and entry into major film festivals.

We've built an extensive network of industry connections, giving us access to high-profile visiting lecturers, and to commissions, competitions and exciting work placement opportunities.

Our industry links include:

-Aardman Animations

-STUDIO AKA

-Passion Pictures

-Mackinnon & Saunders

-Nexus

-Framestore

-Cinesite

-The Mill

-ustwo

-Stylorouge

-Blink Productions

-ITV.

Careers

Animation is one of the most significant and rapidly expanding media fields. An enormous range of career opportunities exist in animation. These range from the traditional techniques of animation storytelling, drawn to model and CGI animation.

Typical careers in the industry include:

-Directors

-Producers

-Animators (in commercials, films, broadcast, online media and games)

-Editors

-Character designers

-Production designers

-Pre-vis artists

-Compositors

-Storyboard artists

-Post-production.

As one of the pre-eminent animation courses in the world, our sought after alumni have landed many exciting, high-profile roles across the industry - including positions as:

-Animators

-Directors

-Producers

-Designers

-Model makers

-Storyboard artists

-CG animators

-CG riggers.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. Read more
This course give you a unique opportunity to explore the many forms of digital culture and their profound effects on society from a number of different angles. It aims to develop participants' skills in forming their own assessments of digital technologies and their impact on society and culture.

Graduates of this programme will have gained the analytical tools required to understand how digitisation and internet technologies have shaped and are shaping modern culture.

Key Benefits

- Develop an understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education.

- Study digital technologies within an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural framework, combining modules from participating departments.

- Obtain on-the-job training in a month long internship within a relevant organisation.

- Take field trips to major London cultural institutions, such as Tate Modern, National Gallery, Institute of Archaeology and the BBC Archives.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-culture-and-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The central focus of the programme is the interrelatedness of technology and culture in contemporary society. The principle educational aims are to develop and enhance participants’ awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to digital culture and technology, including:

- The key information and communication technologies that shape contemporary society.
- The key developments in contemporary cultural expression, specifically as these are driven, mediated or influenced by digital technologies.
- The role of digital technologies in the study of culture and cultural artefacts from the past.
- How digital technologies are shaping society more generally, e.g. social intercourse, social structures, government, international politics, education and law.
- The current critical and theoretical debates around digital culture and the role of technology in cultural life.
- The ethical, moral and philosophical issues that arise from the role and impact of technology in cultural and social life.

- Course purpose -

The aim of the MA Digital Culture & Society programme is to develop participants’ understanding of the role and consequences of digital technologies in contemporary culture, broadly interpreted to include such areas of activity as performing arts, telecommunications, information technology, philosophy, law and education. The programme is conceived as fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing for its teaching on four academic Schools: Arts and Humanities; Law; Physical Sciences and Engineering; and Social Science & Public Policy. It is aimed at a diverse range of participants, offering technological insights to those with non-technical backgrounds, and cultural perspectives to those who have not thought about digital culture in a systematic way.

- Course format and assessment -

The programme consists of a compulsory core module (40 credits), optional modules (which consider aspects of the core module in greater detail) to the value of 80 credits, and a supervised research project (dissertation worth 60 credits). The taught core and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination. One of the optional modules offered is an internship (20 credits) in an organisation relevant to digital culture.

Career Prospects:

Advanced research degree; cultural heritage institutions - libraries, archives, museums, galleries - either as early stage training or as professional development; commercial organisations interested in the social and organisational impact of technology.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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MA in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture, from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Read more
MA in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture, from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this programme studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

Key benefits

- This world-leading programme is highly multidisciplinary and draws on a wide range of expertise in web technologies, digital publishing, open software and content creation, digital cultural heritage, coding in humanities/cultural contexts and maps, apps & the Geoweb.

- The programme provides opportunities to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus.

- Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world's most important culture and media institutions.

- The MA can lead to further research or to careers in cultural heritage institutions (such as museums, libraries, and archives), in multimedia and new media companies, in internet companies, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/digital-humanities-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The digital humanities have played an important role in exploring how we create and disseminate knowledge in an age where so much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology. The principle educational aims are to develop and enhance participants’ awareness and understanding of a range of subjects relevant to the digitally mediated study of human culture.

On completing the MA, you will: have a broad understanding of the most important applications of digital methods and technologies to humanities research questions and their affordances/limitations; be able to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus; and be able to provide critical commentary on the relationship between creativity, digital technology and the study of human culture.

- Course purpose -

The MA in Digital Humanities is designed to develop participants’ understanding of digital theory and practice in studying human culture, from the perspectives of academic scholarship, cultural heritage and the commercial world. Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this programme studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms. The MA programme is aimed at a diverse range of participants and aims to equip students with a variety of strategic, technical and analytical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

- Course format and assessment -

Lectures on theoretical topics; demonstrations; practical classes and exercises.

The programme consists of a compulsory module (Introduction to Digital Humanities), optional modules, and a compulsory Dissertation. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examination.

Career Prospects:

Alumni of the MA in Digital Humanities have followed a number of different routes; they have pursued careers in the academic and research sector, they have undertaken PhD studies, and they have found work in the cultural heritage industries, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This studio based program develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules & Structure

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme:

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing
Interactive Media Critical Theory- 15 or 30 credits
Physical Computing: Arduino and Related Technologies- 30 credits

In Year 2 you will study the following:

Studio Practice- 120 credits
Computational Arts Critical Studies- 60 credits

Assessment

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & Careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more
This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. It provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. It is delivered by Computing with contributions from the Centre for Cultural Studies- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-computational-arts/

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

Follow the links in the student profiles section for work produced by our graduates.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a year (full-time) or two years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation.

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++.

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles.

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules in the Centre for Cultural Studies provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking.

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Theo Papatheodorou.

Modules

Programming for Artists 1- 15 credits
Programming for Artists 2- 15 credits
Workshops in Creative Coding 1- 15 credits
Final Project in Computational Arts- 60 credits
Physical Computing- N/A

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. Read more
The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. The one-year programme is accredited by the professional association Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), and offers students a wide range of up-to-date learning opportunities while helping to develop strong networks designed to enhance their employability.

Degree information

The programme prepares students for professional practice in the field of library and information studies. It equips them with the practical skills required for the identification, location, management and organisation of information and information stores, and fosters an understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years, is offered.

Core modules
-Cataloguing and Classification 1
-Collection Management and Preservation
-Information Sources and Retrieval
-Introduction to Management
-Principles of Computing and Information Technology
-Professional Awareness

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Advanced Preservation
-Cataloguing and Classification 2
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Electronic Publishing
-Historical Bibliography
-Individual Approved Study
-Information Governance
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Manuscript Studies
-Publishing Today
-Records Management
-Web Publishing
-Information Literacy
-Academic and Journals Publishing

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on active learning and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments such as website design and the creation of indexing tools.

Placement
The work placement is only open to full-time students and forms part of the G030 Professional Awareness module. The work placement gives students experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken at the beginning of the third term. We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

The programme aims to be broad-based: we are not trying to produce graduates who can work in only one kind of library or information service. The skills we try to impart are, therefore intended to apply in a wide range of different jobs.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Information Officer, Trowers and Hamlins
-News Reference Specialist, British Library
-Cataloguer, Eton College
-Librarian, BSix
-Knowledge and Information Specialist, CRU Group

Employability
As a vocational Master's, this programme prepares students for employment in the sector, and, in most cases, for promotion from their pre-library school role as a library assistant to a qualified librarian role, such as senior library assistant, assistant librarian, librarian and library manager. Students occasionally choose careers in information provision, such as taxonomists and web designers. There are specialist employment agencies that place students in both short-term and permanent positions, so if students do not find their ideal post straight away, they usually find suitable employment while continuing to seek their ideal post.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This well-established programme is accredited by CILIP (to 2019). It attracts an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders. It combines an appreciation of the traditional library with the latest developments in internet and digital technologies to develop an understanding of the ever-evolving information environment.

Networking opportunities include a two-week work placement, regular journal club and speaker events, guest lectures by professionals and career seminars sponsored by industry professionals.

Students benefit from UCL's proximity to major libraries and repositories, including the British Library and the Senate House LIbrary of the University of London.

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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This MA responds to the pressing need for a high quality postgraduate degree serving the computer games and entertainment industries. Read more
This MA responds to the pressing need for a high quality postgraduate degree serving the computer games and entertainment industries. The emphasis is on games design, art and animation, and will also develop the fundamentals of computer programming, entrepreneurship/business, and your own practice. You'll also be able to work with industry partners- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-computer-games-art-design/

The computer games and interactive entertainment business is a fast-growing multi-billion dollar worldwide business, with games platforms from handhelds and mobiles including iPhones, iPads and Android phones, through consoles such as the Playstation 4, Xbox One and Nintento Wii U, to PCs and massively-multiplayer online games involving tens of thousands of people.

This MA will produce graduates who are well-positioned to have a career in this exciting worldwide industry, meeting the strong demand for graduate computer games designers and artists in the UK and abroad. The programme is delivered by a mix of professionals from the games and effects industries and from the research world.

Potential employers include EA, Ubisoft, Sony SCEE, Creative Assembly, Microsoft, Cinesite, Framestore, and many others.

The influence of computer games is spreading to other digital industries, with gamification and games-based learning, social machines and interactive visualisation of scientific and financial data all exploiting techniques from computer games, and all fields where graduates from this MA could make their mark.

Industry placements
We work closely with industry leaders to shape the course content and to offer industry placements at studios including:

Creative Assembly Sega
Reflections Ubisoft
Sony SCEE
Supermassive
Splash Damage
Climax Studios
Hadrian York
Ideaworks
Rebellion

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor William Latham.

Modules

The skills you will learn throughout the programme will have a focus on games design, art and animation, in addition to gaining the fundamentals of computer programming, entrepreneurship/business and practice.

We expect that you will leave this programme with strong creative skills, production experience and management capability, giving you the potential for senior roles in the computer games and entertainment industries.

Skills
This MA builds on the success of the MSc in Computer Games and Entertainment, and will develop your skills in game design, art and animation. You'll have the opportunity to work with students from this industry-recognised programme on placements and final projects. Through these creative collaborations with artists, games designers and developers we hope that many exciting and innovative projects will emerge. This mix of students also replicates the typical mix of workers in games development and special effects studios.

It's likely that this will encourage exciting and innovative projects to emerge, through creative collaborations

Careers

You'll be well equipped to pursue a career in the computer games industry, covering mainstream computer games for mobile, PC, tablet and console platforms, through to gamification and 'serious games'.

Or you could choose to work in the broader entertainment industries – including advertising, special effects, television and web/design studios.

Graduate employment destinations of our computing programmes include:

Games development studios (including Rebellion, Supermassive, Creative Assembly, MindCandy)
Games publishers (including EA, Ubisoft, Microsoft, Zynga and Sony SCEE)
Special effects and TV companies (including Framestore, Double Negative, The Foundry)
The advertising industry (including M&C Saatchi, JWT)
Web development and design companies (including Dock9, We R Interactive)
'Serious games' companies (including PlayGen)
Start-up companies founded by students

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Rooted in experimental practice, MA Games Design ensures that students are equipped with both the technical and critical skills that allow them to produce a broad portfolio of innovative game prototypes. Read more

Introduction

Rooted in experimental practice, MA Games Design ensures that students are equipped with both the technical and critical skills that allow them to produce a broad portfolio of innovative game prototypes. You will also explore concepts of goal, challenge and obstacle through critical evaluation in order to understand the motive forces of play that operate in game design.

Content

MA Games Design critically examines the concept of play to conceptually frame the practice of games design. You will produce playable prototype gaming experiences and use games design as a means to test critical ideas from broader culture.

The course is particularly interested in how games design principles are being used more generally and how these ideas impact upon our increasingly digital culture. MA Games Design will enable you to understand and articulate the unique value of game experience to an increasingly interested design industry and allow you to understand the value of your game experience prototypes.
Building on LCC's resources, in digital, time-based and interactive media alongside printmaking, graphic design and visual communication, the course encourages experimental and reflective practice that echoes the cross media nature of the design, communication and media industries.

The course also supports progression to research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.

Structure

Term 1 (10 weeks)

1.1 Design & Prototyping (40 Credits)
1.2 Understanding Gaming Experience (20 Credits)

Term 2 and 3 (20 weeks)

2.1 Critical Play (40 Credits)
2.2 Collaborative Unit (20 Credits) – term two only.

Term 4 (5 + 10 weeks)

3.1 Final Major Project + Thesis (60 Credits)

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The print and online pathways of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist. Read more
The print and online pathways of this course will equip you with all the practical and intellectual skills you need to work as a multi-platform journalist. While gaining insights into contemporary digital news production and storytelling, this course is allowing you to gain a deeper grounding in the abilities of written journalism. For this all students learn the basic skills of audio, video. The course has a very practical focus, so you are expected to develop story ideas and gather your own material through research and reporting for journalistic course work. You will be given full training in using our up-to-date media resources, ensuring that you graduate from the course as a multi-skilled journalist being competent in digital and print journalism. Both the MA and the Postgraduate Diploma can be taken as a part-time course (daytime) over two years studying two days a week.

The University of Westminster itself is designated a Skillset Media Academy, Skillset being the UK skills body for the Creative Industries ensuring excellence and quality for education and skills training in interactive media. The PG Diploma and MA have been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) which means we provide industry backed journalism training for online, TV & radio. The organisation accredits a number of British journalism courses, providing the syllabus meets their requirements. Our students regularly win BJTC awards, and the course has been awarded the BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced journalism professionals, and our graduates go on to work with a variety of leading media organisations including BBC TV and Radio, national and local, and BBC News Online, ITN, Russia Today, Al Jazeera, the Financial Times and The Guardian, Conde Nast, and many other media houses in Britain and around the world.

Many of our students have won journalism awards, the most recent being the Best Radio News item for 2014, awarded by the BJTC. We have twice been awarded a BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

Course content

There's a strong emphasis on learning through 'hands-on' practice, in small class groups, using our professional standard facilities. Most of your assessed course-work will be 'real' journalism assignments, a preparation for the world of contemporary journalism.

As well as regular classes taught by experienced journalists on our staff, we also invite other media professionals as guest speakers or to critique student work. We support you in applying for work placements, encourage you go to journalism events and network with professionals, and to pursue other journalism experiences. We work closely together with the charity One World Media, for example. One World Media promotes coverage of the wider world and offers bursaries for students who wish to cover a story in a developing country for their final project.

You will have the chance to air your work on Smoke Radio, the University's multi-award-winning internet radio station, or post items onto the MA's own news site, Westminster World.

The course is taught over two semesters, and for the Master's students followed by the largely self-directed final project in the summer. Unlike many other journalism MAs, you can undertake an extensive practical Final Project. Students usually undertake their placements in the period from the Easter break to the end of the course.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

CORE MODULES - SEMESTER ONE:
-News and Feature Writing
-Multimedia Journalism Skills
-Issues in journalism

OPTIONAL MODULES – SEMESTER TWO:
-Magazine Project
-Online Journalism
-Investigative Journalism
-Travel Journalism
-Sociology of News
-Specialist Journalism

Final Projects (MA only) - These are all individual projects:
-Final Journalism Project
-Online Journalism Final Project

Associated careers

Though designed to prepare you for a career in journalism, this course could also lead to a career in public relations, communications, or any other professional pathway which requires effective communication skills, and the use of convergent media.

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