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Full Time MA Degrees in Architecture, Building & Planning, London, United Kingdom

We have 46 Full Time MA Degrees in Architecture, Building & Planning, London, United Kingdom

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University of Greenwich Architecture & Landscape
Distance from London: 0 miles
This postgraduate programme is designed for individuals interested in becoming professional Landscape Architects. Read more
This postgraduate programme is designed for individuals interested in becoming professional Landscape Architects. Graduates from the programme, which is recognised and accredited by the Landscape Institute, have joined some of London's leading landscape practices, have founded award-winning international design studios and have led strategic urban design projects like the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

The core component of the MA Landscape Architecture programme is the design studio where students engage with landscape, urbanism, agriculture and infrastructure projects in the UK and abroad. With a team of academics and practitioners the students develop their design projects through tutorials and design reviews. They are supported to develop innovative and distinct approaches to landscape architecture, reflected in their final design project and dissertation thesis. Teaching is informed by comprehensive technical and theoretical seminars and guest lectures from international artists, designers and academics. Details of international events, open lectures and student events can be found on: thelandscape.org.

Direct entry to the MA Landscape Architecture requires a design portfolio as well as completion of either the PG Certificate Landscape Design or a BA Hons Landscape Architecture. The MA is part of a Landscape Institute accredited route to becoming a professional Landscape Architect.

The Department is based in a new state of the art building designed by the award winning architects Heneghan Peng; it is equipped with fourteen rooftop landscapes, cutting edge digital workshops, extensive design studios, a world-class library and two gallery spaces.

Our building is located in the heart of Greenwich, the newest addition to a suite of magnificent buildings that occupy the UNESCO World Heritage site and the location of the Greenwich Prime Meridian.

The aims of the MA Landscape Architecture programme are to:

- Act as part of a professionally accredited set of programmes, for students wishing to become Landscape Architects, leading from the Certificate Landscape Design or BA Hons Landscape Architecture

- Establish social, ecological and design processes as a fundamental aspect of landscape architecture

- Encourage design experimentation leading to advanced and exceptional forms of designed landscape

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/arc/lanarc

Architecture and Landscape

We need tools to help us create a built environment that is responsive rather than obstructive to its users and to the world around it. At Greenwich we encourage both students and staff to embrace the interconnectedness of design, construction and building management, of landscape architecture and graphic design, and to constantly look at new ways of exploring these areas.

All architecture programmes focus on the urgent necessity to change our living habits in order to design and build a sustainable urban environment.

The construction management programmes are designed to provide students with a high level of understanding of the design, function, construction and statutory requirements for buildings of all classes, and to prepare them for more advanced employment within the construction industry.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Landscape and Urbanism Theory (40 credits)
Advanced Landscape Design (40 credits)
Design Research Methodologies (20 credits)
Landscape Representation (20 credits)
Master Project (40 credits)
Professional and Technical Practice (20 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Landscape Design (40 credits)
Landscape Representation (20 credits)
Professional and Technical Practice (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Landscape and Urbanism Theory (40 credits)
Design Research Methodologies (20 credits)
Master Project (40 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Students are assessed through design portfolio, essays, seminars and a dissertation.

Professional recognition

The MA Landscape Architecture programme is part of a Landscape Institute accredited route to becoming a fully-qualified Landscape Architect.

Career options

Opportunities are available in Landscape Architecture, Landscape Planning and Urban Design. Recent graduates have successfully gained employment in the public and private sectors in the UK and worldwide. Many have continued to design and work on leading landscape projects such as the London Olympic Park, Gardens by the Bay in Singapore and the Eden Project.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/644026/MA-LANDSCAPE-ARCHITECTURE.pdf

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Associated with the research group Cass Cities, this Spatial Planning and Urban Design MA embeds you amongst the city-focused researchers of The Cass. Read more
Associated with the research group Cass Cities, this Spatial Planning and Urban Design MA embeds you amongst the city-focused researchers of The Cass. Architecture, urban design and planning subjects are explored while you're introduced to a live site in London at the forefront of urban change. Resources and connections across the city are here to help support you throughout your studies. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Spatial Planning and Urban Design MA is associated with Cass Cities, a group of doers, thinkers and researchers at The Cass led by Professor Mark Brearley.

The course combines the disciplines of architecture, urban design, and planning to help you become effective in all aspects of urban understanding. We'll encourage you to become an architect and architectural designer who understands how to intervene strategically in city-level architecture and planning.

Cass Cities engages in urban research and proposition. Urban change happens when people with ideas, knowledge and experience work in creative ways to transform cities. This happens through designing buildings, engaging with local communities, developing masterplans, re-thinking public transport networks and informing policy change.

We'll nurture your ability to form architectural propositions and develop a strong spatial judgement, but we'll also emphasise that there is much more to city processes than building design.

You'll work in the Cass Cities Unit alongside postgraduate architects, and every year we choose live and significant sites which are at the forefront of urban change, with a strong focus on London. There will be work on these live projects as well as the attendance of meetings on relevant topics and access to influential decision-makers in London. These resources and connections will help you direct your work in professional, practical and influential ways.

The projects produced in the unit are concerned with the shaping of both buildings and places. You'll participate in contemporary debates in all forms as a proposer, responder and observer.

Get a taste of things to come by watching this video of Professor Mark Brearley talking about the MA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkCHzBzQOcs

The course can lead to a further MA by Project or PhD research opportunities.

Assessment is through a range of methods, including written coursework submissions and design portfolio presentation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Design Thesis (core, 60 credits)
-Economics of Place (core, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Practice (core, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Theory (core, 20 credits)
-Research for Spatial Planning and Specialism (core, 20 credits)
-Sustainable Communities and Governance of Place (core, 20 credits)
-Urban Design (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is designed for practicing planners and architects wishing to specialise in urban design, as well as urban design practitioners who require knowledge of spatial planning. It is also suitable for graduates with relevant degrees who wish to obtain a postgraduate qualification in planning or urban design. Graduates of this course have gone on to become urban designers and freelance consultants.

If you are a student who has already obtained a relevant London Met first degree, especially in architecture, and wish to progress into the above professions, then we recommend you consider this MA course. Even if you come from a background that does generally do not progress into spatial planning or urban design positions, this course will be of advantage to you in your career.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This programme takes graduates from many disciplines and provides them with the skills to plan, design, build and promote effective websites. Read more
This programme takes graduates from many disciplines and provides them with the skills to plan, design, build and promote effective websites. It is designed for people who manage corporate websites, those who wish to start their own web business and those who would like to build a career in the web design industry. The design of excellent websites presents a notable intellectual challenge and, during the programme, students develop a contemporary, professional and 'real-world' approach. Our objective is to provide a balanced education in the three main aspects of web design: technical, functional and aesthetic.

The technical aspects provide an understanding of the tools, technologies and principles used for the design and development of contemporary websites. This includes the creation of semantically correct markup, the separation of presentation from content (HTML and CSS) and compliance with web standards (W3C).

The functional aspects focus on the creation of websites that provide a good user experience. Principles include, information architecture, content strategy, accessibility, search engine marketing and optimisation (SEM/SEO).

The aesthetic aspects of web design are considered in relation to graphic, artistic, typographic and business objectives, including corporate identity and branding.

See further details at: http://www.websitearchitecture.co.uk/

The Department is based in a new state of the art building designed by the award winning architects Heneghan Peng; it is equipped with fourteen rooftop landscapes, cutting edge digital workshops, extensive design studios, a world-class library and two gallery spaces.

Our building is located in the heart of Greenwich, the newest addition to a suite of magnificent buildings that occupy the UNESCO World Heritage site and the location of the Greenwich Prime Meridian.

The aims of the programme are:

- To equip students with a professional level of competence in web design and content management
- To provide students with the opportunity of creating a live website and to measure its success
- To help students become familiar with the growing and fast-evolving body of knowledge within the web design discipline.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/com/wdcp

Computing - General

Come and study in the award-winning Department of Computing & Information Systems on the magnificent Greenwich Campus. Welcoming home and international students from all backgrounds, CIS provides an exciting, diverse and friendly environment in which to study.

The latest university league table published in the Sunday Times, has rated the computer science department as seventh in the UK for teaching excellence.

What you'll study

- Design for Web Content (30 credits)
- Content Management (30 credits)
- Applied Art for the Web (30 credits)
- Major Project (60 credits)
- User Experience Design (15 credits)
- Social Media and SEO (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Students are assessed through coursework, a portfolio of project work and their involvement with online activities.

Career options

This programme offers enhanced skills for use within the applicant's current career or a new career in web design. Graduates from this programme are now working as front-end developers, user experience designers, SEO consultants and project managers in digital media.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/644422/Web-Design-and-Content-Planning.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/. Read more
This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/

Increasingly, no matter how we live, we know this 'world' primarily through the experience of living within and between cities. These cities continuously produce new challenges for their inhabitants and administrators. In doing so, they also produce opportunities for understanding the constraints and potentials of both human and non-human life.

The MA Cities and Society is a research and training programme designed to support strategic interventions in urban governance, design, institution-building and change, as well as social-spatial development. Distinguished by it's theoretical rigour, integrity and amenability to experimental empirical research, the programme focuses particularly on:

The organisation of contemporary urban economies, including the production of built and virtual environments, physical and social infrastructure
The ways in which different forms of economic accumulation and economic practices impact upon cities, and how any city reflects a particular set of constraints and possibilities
The proliferation of technical systems, media, and practices of interpretation and organisation that change our notions about the ‘proper’ use of things and bodies
The intersections of finance, governance, ecology, and culture in producing multiple forms for assessing urban futures; particularly calculations of risk, sustainability, productivity and creativity
This programme covers the following disciplines: geography, anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, fine arts, media and communications.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Alex Rhys-Taylor.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

-Three core modules
-A specialist option module taken from the department's extensive list, or from the departments of Anthropology, Media and Communications, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Music, Educational Studies or the Centre for Cultural Studies
-A dissertation

Dissertation (60 credits)
In the summer term you complete a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff. 
The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Teaching

One hour lectures address the core themes of each module, followed by one hour seminars in small groups (under 20). You'll be encouraged to attend dissertation classes that train you in the basic principles of dissertation preparation, research and writing. You are also assigned a dissertation supervisor who will be available when you are writing the dissertation (approximately one hour contact time per month).

The main aim of the program is thus to explore new approaches to thinking about and researching the city formation and urban life. This can be broken down into three inter-related aims:

To promote an appreciation of the relevance of the social, sociological knowledge and ways of knowing in the understanding of cities, urban economy, culture and politics, and the management of social change, and to encourage critical understanding of interrelated concepts, debates and themes.
To enable students critically to engage sociological and geographical theories and methodologies relevant to the studies of cities and urbanities, controversies and social change, and conduct an intellectually informed sustained investigation.
To expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the Sociology and related departments and centres to provide a catalyst for independent thought and study.

Expert walks and seminars

The course is also accompanied by a series of expert 'London walks' spread across the year. These are led by a range of researchers from within the Centre for Urban and Community Research, as well as project managers and planners from organisations such as the Greater London Authority, and take students through the sites of that their work focuses on. The Centre for Urban Community research also holds regular seminars with a range of urban professionals, architects and academics from outside the university, giving the MA Cities and Society a spaces to join in with the Centre’s intellectual community.

Asssessment

Essays and dissertation.

MA granted on the completion of 180 CATS (all coursework and dissertation); Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education granted on the completion of 120 CATS (all coursework without dissertation); Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education granted on the completion of 60 CATS (the completion of two core modules).

Skills

Analytical and research skills that intersect basic sociological knowledge with that of architecture, the built environment, cultural and postcolonial theory, geography, planning, digital communications, and ethnography as they apply to the study of cities across the world.

Careers

The training in this programme is applicable to work in multilateral institutions, NGOs, urban research institutes, municipal government, cultural and policy institutions, urban design firms, and universities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. Read more
This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. It also analyses research in applied linguistics, particularly research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment, such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research.

The programme also explores the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment, with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese, and evaluates the role and future of information technology within a resource-based language-learning framework.

The aims of the programme are:

- To explore linguistics issues in the Japanese language

- To analyse the research in applied linguistics, in particular the research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology within source-based language learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom teaching) methods of language learning.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lljap

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Japanese Teaching Methodology (15 credits)
Japanese Language & Analysis (15 credits)
Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:

- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students will be assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates may consider a role as a language teacher in schools, colleges or universities.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643759

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Explore the creative interplay between urban theory and the visual representation of urban cultures and places- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-urban-cultures/. Read more
Explore the creative interplay between urban theory and the visual representation of urban cultures and places- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-photography-urban-cultures/

This programme has been developed by the Centre for Urban and Community Research to encourage creative interplay between practice and theory. You'll have the chance to consider cutting-edge debates in cultural and social theory in a research setting that actively encourages the development of photographic practice.

The programme offers working photographers, visual artists and media practitioners space to reflect critically on their practice.

It also offers those with a background in sociology, urban and cultural geography, cultural studies or anthropology the opportunity to combine visual forms of representation with standard forms of research techniques in investigating urban life and the physical environments of the city.

Convenor

Paul Halliday, Department of Sociology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Paul Halliday (Programme Convenor) or the Postgraduate Programmes Officer

Modules & Structure

Navigating Urban Life- 30 credits
Through The Lens Part A- 15 credits
Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology Practice- 15 credits
Talking Practice A and Talking Practice B- 15 credits each
Urban Photographers- 15 credits
Through The Lens Part B- 15 credits

As well as these modules, you will complete a Dissertation and Major Visual Project (60 credits).

The Dissertation can comprise two parts: a portfolio and a 5-6,000-word Dissertation, or you may submit a 10-12,000-word written Dissertation. The Dissertation will consist of: an account of the rationale of the photographic project; a critical evaluation of photographic practice and issues of reflectivity and knowledge production. In combination with the written part you will be expected to provide evidence of a sustained and coherent body of photographic work focusing on an aspect of urban culture for assessment. Previously, work from Final Visual Projects has been shown on a virtual gallery space linked to the CUCR website.

Assessment

Essays; dissertation; final visual project.

Skills

This MA develops skills in urban photography, visual ethnography and urban research, communications for urban planning, community arts and visual arts practice.

Careers

Graduates of the programme have progressed to the following areas and careers:

Doctoral studies
curating
public relations
urban planning
advertising
community artseducation
social research
journalism

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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MA Interior and Spatial Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores conceptual spatial concerns and notions of how we inhabit space in an area of study that's distinct from but still complementary to architecture. Read more

Introduction

MA Interior and Spatial Design at Chelsea College of Arts explores conceptual spatial concerns and notions of how we inhabit space in an area of study that's distinct from but still complementary to architecture.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To address issues about how we inhabit space and develop sensibilities about intervening into existing architectural structures or situations

- To engage with the language of architecture and the experiential aspects of what it is to inhabit and interact with our spatial environment; from the functional design of built structures to fine art installations, from furniture to computer animation or film

- To explore interior and spatial design from either a research orientated or professional practice point of view or combination of both

Structure

Phase 1: Analysis of Practice and Exploration of Methodologies

Phase 2: Development and Consolidation

Phase 3: Resolution

These phases are set within a credit framework of three assessed units:

- Studio practice and Advanced studio practice, which run sequentially

- Theoretical studies, which runs throughout the course

Studio practice involves evolving and developing a personal programme of studio work and related research. Theoretical Studies provides a framework for you to develop a critical research paper, enabling you to locate your ideas and practice in relation to contemporary debate on cultural and theoretical issues.

Throughout the course you participate in individual and group tutorials, develop skills through Personal Professional Development workshops and on-line resources while the postgraduate talks are organised to introduce you to a range of visiting artists and practitioners.

Work experience and opportunities

We provide our students with a valuable bridge between study and professional practice, as they engage with leading practitioners through the course. This helps students redefine their current and future practice as professional designers, or progress to further research.

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
If you have a fine art, architecture or design background and would like to develop your professional practice within the contemporary fine art realm, this dynamic, production-based course is ideal. Read more
If you have a fine art, architecture or design background and would like to develop your professional practice within the contemporary fine art realm, this dynamic, production-based course is ideal. It enables you to identify and locate spaces in which to make and ‘test' your work, through site-specific work, performance and sound installation, internet activity, print-based publication, and so on.

Key features
-You can explore the relationship between art, architecture, design and space by working alongside professional fine artists, curators and writers.
-Project modules allow you to focus on an area of particular interest and gain valuable practical skills. These culminate with a major public exhibition/event and accompanying publication.
-You also have the chance to undertake site visits to supplement your learning, display work in the University's galleries and collaborate with external parties.

What will you study?

You will develop and apply critical frameworks, debate a range of theoretical, cultural and social issues, and consider a variety of approaches to communicating and publishing your own research. You will focus on individual and collaborative practices, new technology, exhibition production and design, and a theoretical and critical programme to challenge and contextualise individual research. In addition, you will become familiar with the processes necessary to initiate and realise projects, developing and presenting proposals and collaborative working structures.

Assessment

Seminar presentations/individual and collaborative exhibition production and documentation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Digital Art – New Technology
-Project 2 – Collaborative
-Masters Project (Exhibition in Moving Image)

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Read more
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Through its projects at the Design Museum and with prestigious cultural organisations, including the British Council, Architecture Foundation, British Museum and the V&A, the course gives you the opportunity to curate live projects and build your own professional profile. Ambitious international projects are an integral part of the curriculum, and graduates have gone on to successful careers around the world.

Key features]
-As the course is taught in partnership with the Design Museum, London, you will benefit from the experience of studying at one of the world's best-known design museums.
-Professional practice modules at the Design Museum underpin modules on the history and theory of curating design taught at Kingston University.
-Work experience and study visits are an important part of the course.

What will you study?

You will gain a grounding in the professional aspects of curatorial practice as well as first-hand experience in planning and organising exhibitions. This practical experience will be supported by modules in history and theory, ensuring you have a thorough knowledge of the ideas and context underpinning the display and curating of contemporary designed objects. There is a strong emphasis on gaining key employability skills for the sector, ensuring a high level of professional development. We develop live projects with leading organisations such as the British Council, Crafts Council and V&A Museum.

Assessment

Curatorial project briefs, seminar presentations, essays, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Professional Practice
-Interpreting Contemporary Design
-Theory of the Contemporary Object
-Making of the Modern World
-Curating Contemporary Design Dissertation and/or Project

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
This course aims to prepare you for creative roles in the context of landscape and urbanism design practice and research. Read more
This course aims to prepare you for creative roles in the context of landscape and urbanism design practice and research. Our London location, local and European networks and an international perspective provide the focus for contemporary landscape and urbanism projects, including green and water infrastructures, resilient and adaptive city strategies and the detailed design of places for people.

Key features
-The course provides an innovative design education, with opportunities to participate in live projects such as European and local consultancy within the Landscape Interface Studio.
-Study visits, international workshops, external lectures, live projects, and visits to London shows, museums and institutions allow you to develop experience and knowledge to support your individual career ambitions.

What will you study?

Design projects reflect opportunities and challenges of contemporary landscape urbanism, at global and local scales. Themes include public realm, green and blue infrastructures, wellbeing, growth and transformation through time, climate change, biodiversity, city and identity, and zones of transition. Modules in research and theory support critical reflection, while study of materials and techniques supports appropriate technical knowledge and inquiry.

Workshops include: communication, learning through making, observation, mapping and consultation, building information modelling (BIM).

The course offers interdisciplinary postgraduate learning.

Assessment

Design projects and portfolio, landscape and urbanism manifesto, and an individual design research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Landscape & Urbanism Design Portfolio 01
-Landscape and Urbanism Design Portfolio 02
-Landscape & Urbanism Theory, Research and Representation
-Landscape & Urbanism Professional Practice, Process & Making
-Masters Project

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This unique research degree is tailored to opening new opportunities in creative practice, professional and academic fields. The course provides unparalleled access to a range of resources within a stimulating and creative environment. Read more
This unique research degree is tailored to opening new opportunities in creative practice, professional and academic fields. The course provides unparalleled access to a range of resources within a stimulating and creative environment. You can choose from a number of subject areas, which you can browse in the carousel below. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The MA by Project is an innovative degree that gives you the opportunity to set your own agenda as a practitioner / researcher. You will be supported to develop and explore your practice through a self-directed research project, making your own work central to your programme of study throughout the duration of the course.

A core programme of research seminars are designed to open up a range of approaches to research and foster critical, analytical, reflective and evaluative skills. The course team and subject specialists will support you throughout the development and execution of your project. Workshops, presentations and seminars foster discussion and feedback from a multi-disciplinary community.

Projects are supported in the following subject areas: architecture and rapid change, architectural history and theory, cities, interiors, fine art, film and animation, furniture and product design, music, photography, silversmithing and jewellery, textiles and visual communication.

Outputs may take many forms, such as:
-Made objects in a variety of media (for example, painting, photography, printmaking, film, animation, silversmithing and jewellery, musical instruments, furniture, textiles)
-Documented actions such as performance art, live art, exhibitions, installations or events
-A design portfolio allied to one of our many design studios in architecture, cities, interiors, graphic design and illustration
-A written thesis investigating a theoretical or historical topic. This may take the form of a published output, an exhibition text, a case study or a PhD proposal

Resources

The Cass offers unparalleled facilities for designing and making. You will have access to specialist workshops, equipment and facilities all run by highly skilled staff.

Facilities include rapid prototyping, CNC routing, waterjet cutting, 3D printing, woodmill, furniture making workshops, musical instrument workshops, upholstery workshops, soft furnishing, finishing area, metal fabrication workshop, plastic and model making workshop, ceramics, silversmithing and jewellery workshops, restoration and conservation, AV/TV hire shop, recording studios, audio laboratories,editing suites, darkrooms, printroom, textiles workshop.

As well as a dedicated art and design library you will have access to libraries across the University. Our London location means that students are within reach of The National Art Library at the V&A, The British Architectural Library at RIBA, the British Library plus innumerable national and specialist collections.

Graduating students are able to nominate a specialism to be included within their degree award title to reflect either their project discipline or specific topic, eg MA by Project (Fine Art).

Assessment

At the end of each semester work is submitted for assessment.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Research Methods in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 40 credits)
-Research Project Development in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 40 credits)
-Research Project in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 60 credits)
-Theoretical Studies for Art, Architecture and Design (core, 20 credits)
-Contextual Studies: MA by Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The MA by Project can help you further your practice and develop new skills, extend your expertise and cultivate your professional profile, explore new avenues of thought and creative potential. You will be encouraged and supported in building a network of opportunities and developing external links that will help formulate the next stage in your career.

Past students have used the MA to launch new businesses as well as further their careers in a variety of professions. The MA by Project provides the opportunity to progress the theoretical development of your practice to a higher level and is therefore a suitable base for the development of a PhD.

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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The MA programme is for suitably qualified graduates from a range of disciplines wishing to pursue studio-based spatial research in the context of theoretical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-research-architecture/. Read more
The MA programme is for suitably qualified graduates from a range of disciplines wishing to pursue studio-based spatial research in the context of theoretical work- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-research-architecture/

The MA programme has been developed to allow you to combine theoretical research with critical spatial practice. Lectures, seminars and workshops will equip you with a rigorous grounding in critical spatial theory.

The theoretical module provides a thorough coverage of the historical, philosophical and technological aspects of the intersection of space, power and conflict.

This programme is orientated towards graduates who want to undertake training in research architecture before proceeding to PhD study, or to pursue or enhance a career in spatial practices.

As with our MPhil/PhD track, our MA programme draws a multidisciplinary mix of innovative architects and other spatial practitioners, albeit in the early stages of their careers. It also gains international exposure through student participation in major exhibitions.

A recent external examination report concluded: “This is an excellent course and possibly the most innovative one in the country".

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Susan Schuppli.

Modules & Structure

MA Research Architecture begins with a specific core module called ‘Introduction to Research Architecture’ as well as the MA Core Module B, which is shared by students from the whole Visual Cultures MA cohort.

The four assessed components of the MA comprise:

the Special Subject ‘Conflict and Negotiations'
a single major spatial research project (Studio)
the Symposium
a Dissertation

The research project (Studio), actively engages with spatial practice and theory, and concentrates on in-depth analysis of a distinct issue, process or site. This project forms the core of the MA Dissertation, which you submit at the end of the programme.

A series of seminars, workshops and lectures will provide you with the necessary and stimulating information and create a forum for discussion on contemporary approaches and theories in architectural and spatial research.

Independent Research

The research project (Studio), actively engages with spatial practice and theory, and concentrates on in-depth analysis of a distinct issue, process or site. This project forms the core of the MA Dissertation, which you submit at the end of the programme.

Two-day MA Symposium

(Oral Presentation on Dissertation Topic) (30 credits)
The MA Symposium provides you with the opportunity, fairly early on in the research/writing process, to present a worked up and focused investigation of your dissertation topic or some aspect of it. Your presentation will be formally assessed. Presenting on your dissertation research at this stage is invaluable for enabling you to define your project and, through verbal feedback and discussion, to progress your thinking. Assessment: one oral presentation in early June (20 minutes, plus 10 minute discussion).

Site visit

Every year the MA classes will travel to a place of contemporary interest, generally environments undergoing rapid, intense change where political transformation can be viewed in the development of the built environment.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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