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Full Time MA Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture

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Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. Read more
Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. The programme involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing you to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices.

The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages, particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury and Paris, where you relocate to Kent’s Paris centre for the spring term.

The MA in Comparative Literature is an ideal programme for those wanting to engage in and pursue detailed literary and cultural analysis that crosses national boundaries.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/postgraduate/taught-comparative-literature.html

Course structure

The programme comprises three main interweaving strands:

- themes and major figures in European literature

- interactions between European national literatures, as reflected in important genres such as autobiography and the fantastic

- comparative literature in theory and practice, with an emphasis on the history of the discipline and ways of reading literature comparatively.

These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts: national literatures, genres, media and theory.

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of comparative literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- further the University’s International Strategy by attracting graduate students from abroad as well as from the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in your areas of interest

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively

- provide you, consistent with point one above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals in comparative literature.

Research areas

Areas of particular research strength in Comparative Literature at Kent include the European avant-garde, modernism and postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literary theory, literature and medicine, literature and the visual arts, literature and sexuality, and literature and philosophy. The list below indicates the range of current research interests of members of staff within Comparative Literature and the other disciplines with whom we work closely. Many of these staff are members of the Centre for Modern European Literature. They can supervise postgraduate students for the MA or PhD degrees in any of their respective areas of expertise. If you are considering applying to undertake a research degree, we encourage you to contact us to discuss your plans at an early stage of your application.

- The European avant-garde
- Modernism and postmodernism
- Postcolonial literature
- Literary theory
- Literature and medicine
- Literature and philosophy
- Literature and sexuality
- Literature and the visual arts

- Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing. Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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A laboratory of ideas, reflection, and narratives in the Digital Age. Read more

A laboratory of ideas, reflection, and narratives in the Digital Age

Do you wonder how a literary work becomes a classic or bestseller in the Digital Age? Would you like to learn about the steps taken between publishing a manuscript and the media reviews, talk shows, or blogs in which the work is discussed? Then this Master's programme might be for you.

Literature today continues to inspire as a laboratory of ideas, dreams, and narratives, even while facing new challenges. Novels, poems, and short stories now reach their audiences through printed books, e-books, and audiobooks, and through the Internet. Literary texts, including the classics, are being adapted to games and TV dramas, yet a growing numbers of visitors to book fairs shows that literature itself remains a powerful medium.

In the Master’s programme Literature Today, you will learn to identify and critically evaluate the most recent national and international developments in literature, and to situate these from a historical perspective. You will be equipped with the tools to identify and explain the quality of literary works in times of increasing commercialisation. You will learn how literature circulates within the market as part of a creative industry sustained by centuries-old tradition, and you will investigate from theoretical and practical angles how to help to spread literature, explain it to a broader public, and translate academic insights for the reading public.

Critical reflection, building up a repertoire, the consolidation of writing skills, and an understanding of how literary institutions operate in an era of globalisation are central to your studies during this programme. You can also complete an internship with publishing houses, media corporations, libraries, literary foundations, or cultural institutions – the job market and professional field for which this Master’s programme prepares you.

Tracks

You can choose from among the following tracks to tailor the programme to your interests and desired career path:

1. English and Comparative Literature (entirely in English)

2. Dutch Literature (in Dutch and English)

3a. French Literature (Modern Literature in European Languages) 

3b. German Literature (Modern Literature in European Languages)

3d. Hispanic Literature (Modern Literature in European Languages)

3d. Italian Literature (Modern Literature in European Languages)

After graduation

As a graduate of the Master in Literature Today, you will be trained to critically engage with the challenges that confront literature in our globalised, digitalised, and commercialised world. The programme content approaches these challenges from both a theoretical and practical perspective so that you will be fully prepared for the job market.

During your studies, the programme will:

  • Provide you with knowledge about the sociocultural contexts in which literature is created, distributed, and read.
  • Teach you to critically reflect on contemporary issues concerning the field of literature.
  • Train your analytical and writing skills so that you will be able to translate academic knowledge to a broad public.
  • Allow you to profile yourself as an expert in literature from a specific language area.

Career prospects

During your studies, you will become acquainted with different literary institutions that operate in the field of literature and culture. After finishing the programme, you can use the academic and practical skills acquired during your year of study and begin working at one of these institutions.

Judged best in the field

The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2017 ranked Utrecht University’s Literature programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands.



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Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture. Read more
Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/index.html) and the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar.

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you take a choice of four modules, before undertaking a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend the spring term in Paris.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/postgraduate/taught-french-and-comparative-literature.html

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for you to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- allow you to study modules in both modern French studies and comparative literature

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media

- enhance your comprehension and communication skills in both French and English

- develop your awareness of various critical and research methodologies and of the interplay between literature, art and cultural context

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- provide a deepening of intercultural awareness and understanding

- provide opportunities for the further development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector

- provide further development of critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of French literature and thought from the 18th century to the present, with research clusters organised around the following areas: the European Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment; Ekphrasis; Franco-Sino relations; Life Writing; Medical Humanities; Philosophy and Critical Theory; French Surrealism; Cubism; the Avant-Garde; the interface between visual arts and text.

Recent publications have focused on authors, artists and thinkers including the following: Apollinaire; Artaud; Badiou; Barthes; Blanchot; Cocteau; Crébillon fils; Deleuze; Diderot; Djebar; Flaubert; Foucault; Houellebecq; Lacan; Maupassant; Mérimée; Nimier; Proust; Sade; Yourcenar; Zola.

Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)
Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in French studies is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. Read more
This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. The fundamental objective is to make Arabic culture and literature accessible to a wider body of postgraduate students and to provide them with training in the study of literature. Students develop an advanced understanding of Arabic literature and gain detailed knowledge of its past and present. The syllabus combines the literary approaches of comparative literature with in-depth study of Arabic literature. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with, among other things, literary theory, translation techniques, the sociology of literature, the social and political dimensions of modern Arabic literature, and different genres and themes of classical, medieval and modern Arabic literature.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three units from the lists of options below, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Options List:
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Early and Medieval Arabic Linguistic Thought: Scholarship and Literature - 15PNMC410 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
A Modern Arabic Literary Genre: Themes and Techniques - 15PNMC046 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Popular Literature: Themes, Genres & Theory - 15PNMC045 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Classical Arabic Prose Literature and Adab - 15PNMC047 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Arabic Critical Theory and Thought - 15PNMC403 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year

MA Arabic Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 34kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/file80795.pdf

Teaching & Learning

All courses are taught in English, and essays and presentations are also done in English. All courses apart from "Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature" involve reading some original Arabic texts.

Most courses are taught in seminar groups. These demand active participation by students, e.g. by giving presentations and by discussion with other students in the class, in order to develop research potential, original thinking and, by the tutor's direction, structured knowledge of the topic.

Classes are one two-hour session each week; in some cases an additional tutorial hour is added. In addition students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars organised by the AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literature and the London Middle East Institute.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in MA Arabic Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Graduates can use their skills in Arabic and literary study in a variety of occupations, particularly those in which deep knowledge of Arabic intellectual culture and a trained mind are an advantage.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focussed, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/macomparativeliteratureandculturebyresearch.aspx

You will be able to:

• Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support
• Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture
• Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium
• Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies
• Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:
Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This core course is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines your theoretical understanding and provides you with the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if you so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline

- Learnt to undertake focused research, developed writtten and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a Visiting Examiner and includes a Viva Voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism and translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online.

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What is the 'Master of Western Literature' all about?. The Master of Western Literature is a unique initial master's programme aimed at an in-depth, intercultural and comparative study of literature in different Western traditions and epochs. Read more

What is the 'Master of Western Literature' all about?

The Master of Western Literature is a unique initial master's programme aimed at an in-depth, intercultural and comparative study of literature in different Western traditions and epochs. As one of the world's oldest universities, located in a multi-lingual society and at the heart of Europe, KU Leuven is a unique location for a programme that focuses on the dynamic interactions between various literatures, languages, and cultures, as well as on intercultural and international aspects of literature.

This master's programme stands out both nationally and internationally for its advanced degree of specialisation in literary studies and its unique intercultural and multilingual perspective.

Specialists in various national literatures and in literary theory collaborate to ensure the high level and quality of the courses. The programme's broad spectrum of national literatures allows you to combine these according to your own interests and thus to deepen your knowledge, à la carte. At the same time, this advanced level of specialisation is combined with a critical, theoretical and broadly comparative perspective. Finally, the concept of 'Western' literatures is thoroughly examined and questioned against the background of more general social, political, and cultural perspectives, both from historical and contemporary points of view.

This is an initial master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Spotlight

The programme does not take for granted the key terms in its title: 'Western' and 'literature.' Rather, it aims to investigate the development of literature, literary systems, and traditions in the West and to address the challenges that these phenomena meet with in our contemporary globalised society.

Notions like the canon, tradition, literary genre, and poetics are critically examined and placed within relevant historical contexts. They are studied in relation to the general concepts that determine them, such as civilization, culture, identity, and alterity. The idea of 'Western' literature is also scrutinized from an ideological perspective: what is the relation between literature, nation, language and territory and how has this relation changed in a context of decolonization, globalization, and changing relations between East and West? Within this general theoretical and comparative perspective, the 'building blocks' of Western literature - the different linguistic or national literary traditions - are not neglected and a wide range of elective courses offer ample opportunities for studying these literatures in more detail.

Objectives

  • The student can make a critical analysis of a literary text and situate it in the broader cultural-historical context of Western literature.
  • The student can develop a scholarly and critical interpretation of literary texts and other cultural phenomena and can communicate this interpretation in both written and oral form for both a scholarly and a general audience.
  • The student has an informed understanding of the specific status of literature as a linguistic system that interacts with broader social and cultural contexts.
  • The student is familiar with the diverse ways in which Western literature has been an object of study, both from a historical and a contemporary perspective. The student is familiar with historical and current engagements with the following questions: (a) what is Western literature?, (b) how has the idea of Western literature been conceptualized and problematized, (c) how does Western literature interact with its contexts?, and (d) how do different literary traditions interact within the larger framework of Western literature?
  • The student is familiar with new methods and approaches within literary studies, cultural studies and literary theory. The student can critically assess these methods and approaches and apply them in a specific research context.
  • The student understands the ways in which different humanities and social science disciplines influence literary studies. The student can employ insights from these disciplines in his or her own research.
  • The student can formulate a research question and gather the primary and secondary material necessary for the research. The student can conceptualize, structure and compose a MA thesis.
  • The student can communicate research results in both oral and written form for an academic audience.
  • The student can communicate research results to non-specialized audiences.
  • The student follows the deontological and ethical codes of scientific research in his or her research.
  • The student has an insight in diversity and intercultural interaction and can use this insight to participate in contemporary social and cultural debates.
  • The student develops a lasting interest in Western literature and culture.
  • The student develops a critical literacy that he or she can deploy in different professional and social contexts.
  • The student who takes language-specific modules has an advanced knowledge of the literary historical traditions in that language and can connect these to broader developments within the Western literary tradition.
  • The student who takes language-specific modules that are taught in a foreign language has a C2 (or at the very least a C1) proficiency level for understanding (listening and reading), speaking (production and interaction) and writing. This holds especially for students who write their MA thesis in a foreign language.

Career perspectives

As a graduate of the Master of Western Literature programme, you will have acquired a wide range of skills that you will be able to use in a large number of professional contexts. Your strengths will mainly be your ability to reflect on complex cultural phenomena, your insight into and facility with plurilingualism and interculturality, and your ability to bring those insights across in the media and/or in educational contexts.

Through your advanced insight in intercultural relations, you will be exceptionally well placed to work in an international context (e.g., embassies, European institutions, translating services, and international companies). In addition, you will have acquired an extensive knowledge of literature and the skills for reporting on it. The publishing world, the media, and journalism will therefore offer more possibilities.

After taking a teacher training programme, you will also be able to start teaching.



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This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA is taught on an interdepartmental basis by staff who cover an exceptionally wide range of expertise. The flexible nature of the programme enables students to develop their own interests whilst gaining a thorough understanding of modern literary theory and comparative literature.

About this degree

Students develop a thorough understanding of modern theories of literature, the contexts of literature and the interaction between literatures, and gain practical experience in comparative literary studies. The programme also develops the critical and analytical skills necessary for research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. There are two pathways through the programme: taught and research.

Taught: two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: two core modules (60 credits), one optional module (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Modern Literary Theory
  • Comparative Literary Studies

Optional modules

  • Revolutions in Literature: Writing China's Twenthieth Century
  • Apocalypse Literature
  • Consumer Culture in Literature
  • Readings in Twentieth Century Chinese Literature and Culture: Family, Childhood, Gender
  • Performance, Visual Media and Popular Culture in Africa
  • Theoretical Issues in history and Literature
  • Language, Culture & History
  • Topics in Cultural Studies
  • Translation Studies
  • Comparative Medieval literature
  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics, and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
  • Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
  • Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning

Teaching and supervision are organised on an interdepartmental basis. Teaching sessions are envisaged as interactive, with a limited amount of lecturing and an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. Assessment is based on a combination of shorter and longer essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Comparative Literature MA

Careers

Publishing, academic teaching, research and journalism are the most common destinations for graduates with an MA in Comparative Literature but the civil service, teaching or employment as a translator or copywriter are becoming increasingly attractive alternatives.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Digital Co-ordinator, Institute of Contemporary Arts
  • Children's Books Editor, Hachette-Phoenix
  • Junior Copywriter, J. Walter Thompson, Athens
  • Freelance Journalist, CNN
  • PhD in French, University of Oxford

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

With its exceptional range of modern and ancient languages and cultures, UCL provides a comprehensive environment for comparative literary study.

Departments housed in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities cover Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Ancient Greek, Hebrew, Icelandic, Italian, Latin, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish and Yiddish. The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) deals with all the major languages, literatures and cultures of Central and Eastern Europe. A co-operation agreement with SOAS, University of London, covers teaching as well as research and ensures global coverage.

Many UCL staff have comparative and interdisciplinary research interests in addition to their subject specialism. We are particularly interested in innovative approaches to literary and cultural studies, and in research with a comparative, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary focus, including research in the following fields: literary and cultural theory, material and visual cultures, reception studies, themes and genres, cultural history, comparative gender and performance studies, translation studies, diaspora and migration studies, and new media.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?. Read more
Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?

Building on the internationally recognised expertise of both our Departments of Language and Linguistics, and our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, our MA Translation and Literature course will allow you to further specialise in literature and general translation. In the second term you will also learn techniques of professional literary translation. You develop your own personal translation skills, allowing you to translate a literary work accurately and creatively from one language to another for your dissertation.

Our course is offered with the combination of English and one of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. You can be a native or near-native speaker of any of these languages, as you learn to translate to and from both languages. You work with native speakers in developing your ability to move accurately and quickly between your chosen language and English.

Explore our hands-on, practical modules, including:
-Principles of Translation
-US and Caribbean literatures in dialogue
-Translation Portfolios
-Technologies of Translation

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK (REF 2014)

Our Department of Language and Linguistics is ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet and our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet, according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016].

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our lecturers are skilled interpreters and translators, experienced in training students with the necessary skills for professional practice. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

Our lecturers come from around the world including France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Cuba, China, and the UK. They will share their expertise with you in the areas of professional translation.

Within our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, Professor Karin Littau specialises in book and film history, reception, adaptation and translation studies, and is especially interested in the effects of print, cinematograph, and computers on practices of reading, writing and translation. Dr Clare Finburgh has translated several plays from French into English, and worked as dramaturg for productions of British plays in France, and French works in the UK.

Specialist facilities

-24-hour self-access to our translation lab dedicated to translation students
-Use specialist software such as SDL Trados Studio 2015
-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at the department’s Myth Reading Group
-Access the University’s Media Centre, equipped with state-of-the-art studios, cameras, audio and lighting equipment, and an industry-standard editing suite
-Weekly multilingual workshops led by internationally renowned experts from the industry
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

If you love literature and languages and would like to acquire professional translation skills, then our MA Translation and Literature is for you. Takers of our courses in translation can use the skills gained to further their future career in this area.

You develop a range of key employability skills including researching, writing for specific purposes, and translation. Our course typically leads to a career in translation, but could also lead to a career in education, publishing and administration.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Principles of Translation and Interpreting
-Technologies of Translation
-Dissertation
-Translation Portfolio I (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Italian) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Italian) (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-The Tale: Tellings and Re-Tellings (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation (optional)
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital (optional)
-Film and Video Production Workshop (optional)
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose

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This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location. Read more
This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location.

After a term at our Canterbury campus, you move to Kent’s Paris centre to study modules with a specific focus on this city, allowing you to benefit from the experience of living and studying in another European culture. All classes in Paris are taught in English. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Comparative Literature involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing students to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices. The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian, as well as from colleagues in the School of English.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

This programme is for those wanting to pursue detailed literary and cultural studies and also wishing to benefit from the experience of living and studying overseas.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. The spring term modules are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. These modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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This flexible programme combines in-depth exploration of the Dutch language area, comprising the Netherlands, Flanders, Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean, with practical acquisition of linguistic and intercultural skills and a range of specialisations in translation, literature, history and culture in the Low Countries, all in a global perspective. Read more

This flexible programme combines in-depth exploration of the Dutch language area, comprising the Netherlands, Flanders, Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean, with practical acquisition of linguistic and intercultural skills and a range of specialisations in translation, literature, history and culture in the Low Countries, all in a global perspective.

About this degree

The Dutch Studies pathway of the Language, Culture and History MA, unique in the UK, consists of a core module offering a choice of themes and concepts - Post-Colonialism, Memory, Collective Identities and Trauma - and options in Dutch literature, culture, history and society. It offers the opportunity to acquire and improve Dutch language skills as part of its regular programme, along with the methods, concepts and theories essential for the intercultural labour market.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme offers two pathways: taught and research.

Taught: core cross-language course (30 credits), taught modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: core cross-language course (30 credits), taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality.

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Contemporary History, Culture and Society of the Low Countries
  • Making Modern Dutch Literature
  • Advanced Translation from Dutch into English
  • Dutch Language
  • Project in Dutch
  • Modern Literary Theory
  • Comparative Literary Studies
  • Translation Studies
  • Gender Studies
  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in the broad area of Modern Dutch Studies, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words for the taught pathway and 18,000 words for the research pathway.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, class discussions and individual tutorials. Assessment is through a variety of methods including coursework, essays, oral presentation, unseen examination and project work. UCL Dutch is known for its advanced use of innovative digital teaching and learning resources.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Dutch Studies MA

Careers

Spoken across the Netherlands, Flanders, Suriname and parts of the Caribbean, Dutch is one of the most frequently requested languages by UK employers. The Netherlands are a top export and import destination for the UK and the connections with Flanders also make Dutch an extremely useful skill to have in an increasingly competitive job market.

Graduates with Dutch are rare and this makes for a very vibrant employment situation, even in times of economic crisis. There is demand for graduates who can help overcome the shortage of teachers of Dutch and translators from Dutch into English. The demand for teachers is from adult education institutes and increasingly from higher and secondary education; in the case of translators it comes from Dutch, Belgian and European institutions, from translation agencies and from business.

Employability

The programme, unique to the UK, will be of interest both to those who wish to enhance their knowledge of Dutch culture for professional purposes – in the field, for example, of education, media, commerce and tourism – as well as to students wishing to pursue their studies at doctoral level.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Dutch is the largest Centre for Low Countries Studies in the Anglophone world. It was here that Dutch first attained the status of a serious academic discipline and a chair in Dutch has been occupied almost continuously since 1919. In both teaching and research the department is an internationally recognised centre for excellence.

UCL Dutch has one of the largest Dutch libraries outside of the Low Countries and hosts an annual Writer-in-Residence as well as regular research seminars by visiting lecturers and professors from the Netherlands and Flanders, together with exchange students ensuring close contact between the department and the Dutch-speaking countries.

UCL's central location offers students easy access to London's extraordinary resources, including the major collection of Dutch and Flemish Art in the National Gallery, the Courtauld Institute of Art, and the Warburg Institute, among many others. The cultural offerings of the Dutch Centre Austin Friars, Flanders House, and the Dutch and Belgian embassies and associations, and a wealth of exhibitions, films and theatrical performances are all nearby.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more

UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

About this degree

Optional modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, film-making, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Advanced Scandinavian Translation
  • Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
  • Introduction to Old Norse
  • Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
  • Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
  • Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Scandinavian Studies MA

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability

In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This wide-ranging and flexible programme offers students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the cultures of the Hispanic world at an advanced level. Read more

This wide-ranging and flexible programme offers students the opportunity to develop their understanding of the cultures of the Hispanic world at an advanced level. As a pathway of the Language, Culture and History MA, students can combine their interest in Hispanic Studies with optional modules from Gender Studies, Translation Studies, and Comparative Literature.

About this degree

The programme offers a broad range of optional modules in Hispanic cultures from the early modern period to the present day, alongside relevant training in research skills and methodologies. Students develop a knowledge and understanding of the key aspects and complex concepts used to understand Hispanic literature, film and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality

Optional modules

Students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Spanish Film
  • The Works of Jorge Luis Borges
  • The Conquest of Mexico
  • New Argentine Cinemas
  • How to Make an Eight-Minute Documentary
  • Advanced Translation from and into Spanish

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a literary, cultural or historical topic, which culminates in a 12,000-word dissertation (taught pathway) or 18,000-word dissertation (research pathway), written in Spanish or English.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, classes and tutorials. Students are encouraged to undertake independent reading both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including long essays, take-home exams, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Hispanic Studies MA

Careers

This programme may lead to further research, or to employment in which a broad familiarity with Spanish and Latin American culture is an asset.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • PhD in Spanish Literature, University of Oxford

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Spanish & Latin American Studies features staff who are nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field, who publish in their specialist areas and are active researchers. The department regularly hosts a number of events including conferences, research seminars, symposia and a documentary film course in Cuba.

Our location in London provides access to numerous cultural and social events relating to the Spanish-speaking world, its literature, films, history and politics. We encourage active participation in the events of the Instituto Cervantes and the Institute for the Study of the Americas, both of which provide access to excellent resources to enhance your studies.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The German Studies pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History offers a wide range of modules covering many aspects of German language, culture and history. Read more

The German Studies pathway of the MA in Language, Culture and History offers a wide range of modules covering many aspects of German language, culture and history. This highly flexible programme allows students from a diversity of backgrounds to pursue topics in more depth, to acquire new areas of interdisciplinary expertise and to enhance their German language skills.

About this degree

This MA enables further exploration of aspects of German literature, culture, history, politics, and social and political thought, within an explicitly thematic and theoretical framework. Students can specialise in particular areas of interest through the optional modules. Text-based language teaching is available for students wishing to develop their linguistic skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme offers two pathways: taught and research.

Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality.

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Wolfram's Parzival
  • Reading Modern Novels
  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
  • Staging the Past: German Historical Drama since 1770
  • Writing and Rewriting Marchen and other Fantastic Tales
  • Discussion and Essay in German: Intensive Essay Writing
  • Translation from and into German: Advanced Translation
  • Geman Literature and Psychology

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 60-credit dissertation of 12,000 words, or a 90-credit dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Formal teaching occurs in the first two terms and the third term is devoted to revision sessions, examinations and detailed supervision of the dissertation project. Student performance is assessed through coursework essays, a dissertation, and unseen written examinations.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: German Studies MA

Careers

The MA provides an excellent foundation year for subsequent doctoral research in all areas of the department's research specialisms. Many students progress from one of our MA programmes to an MPhil or PhD research degree.

Employability

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, German Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, teaching and academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is ranked third in the UK for Modern Languages in the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017.

UCL's central location offers students easy access to excellent resources, including the British Library, the Institute for Germanic Studies, the German Historical Institute and the Institute of Historical Research. The cultural offerings of the Goethe Institut, the Austrian Institute, and a wealth of exhibitions, films and theatrical performances are all nearby.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term. Read more
The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages and the Department of Comparative Literature and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar. After a term at our Canterbury campus, you study at Kent’s Paris School of Arts and Culture to study modules with a particular focus on the city, gaining the experience of living within another European culture.

After you have taken four modules across the autumn and spring terms, you undertake a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. The French and Comparative Literature MA can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material, and those with the desire to live in Paris in an active and extended engagement with the culture.

In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where your studies are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take two modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year.

The modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in the city. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
FR998 - French Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. Read more
This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. The ‘Directed Readings’ courses, available in several modern languages, have a flexible curriculum which allows them to accommodate the interests of individual students or groups of students. The MA will provide, inter alia, an appropriate training for students wishing to proceed to postgraduate research in South Asian studies; its focus on South Asian language, culture and literature distinguishes it from the interdisciplinary perspective of the MA in South Asian Area Studies on the one hand and the MA in Comparative Literature on the other.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of the term to determine the most appropriate level of study.

Part-time students (two years) will take two courses in the first year (normally their Minors) and the Major and dissertation in the second year; part-time students (three years) take one course per year, and their dissertation in the third year.

- Choosing the Courses
Applicants are asked to specify their preferred major subject and to give an alternative, as not all courses are available every year and practical considerations such as timetabling may limit choices.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects, during which time they may sample different subjects through attending lectures etc.

Programme Specification

MA Languages and Cultures of South Asia- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/file80816.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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