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History & Archaeology×

King’s College London, Full Time MA Degrees in History & Archaeology

We have 13 King’s College London, Full Time MA Degrees in History & Archaeology

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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.



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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern. Read more

This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern.

It is taught in the Department of Classics, by experts in the field of Classical reception. The Department's research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture, giving the programme a breadth unmatched anywhere in the world. 

The programme is interdisciplinary, and is open to students with no prior knowledge of ancient languages. 

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our MA course focuses on the way the classical world has influenced the culture of later periods, and how it continues to do so. With a strong focus on research the course is taught in the Department of Classics by experts in the field of classical reception. Our Department’s research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture. This means we can offer you a breadth of expertise that is unmatched anywhere in the world. Through this advanced course of study, we will develop your literary, historical and archaeological analysis skills, and provide you with the opportunity to learn ancient and modern languages to extend these skills.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to typically 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

The advanced skills that we give you have proved very popular with employers in a wide range of professions, and many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department. Others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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This popular Modern History course is focused on European and British history from the mid 18th century onwards and explores the key topics of the period… Read more

This popular Modern History course is focused on European and British history from the mid 18th century onwards and explores the key topics of the period, from European nation building to modern British politics. The couse is designed primarily for those interested in Continental European and/or British History and draws on a wide range of approaches to give you a comparative perspective. 

It offers a huge range of options taught by world-leading experts, including modules taught in the Institute of Contemporary British History.

The degree leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked in the top five in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King’s graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).
  • Innovative comparative approach to British and Continental European history since the 18th-century.
  • The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Description

The history of modern Europe and Britain has always been central to our teaching. This popular Modern History MA course will give you the skills that you need to study modern history, and you will explore the key topics of the period, from European nation building to modern British politics. We have designed this MA primarily for those interested in Continental European and/or British History since the mid-18th century, and the course draws on a wide range of approaches to give you a comparative perspective. You will also have the opportunity to study a modern language, which will extend the range of sources that you can engage with.

We will help you to make comparisons between the experiences of different societies and polities, a skill that we believe is fundamental to understanding historical issues, and to think broadly, not just in terms of country, period and discipline.

The course will give you access to an exceptionally wide range of optional modules from across the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, as well as other institutions. You can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series, such as Europe from 1793–1991 and Politics & Society in Britain, 1780–1945. 

Institute of Contemporary British History (ICBH) 

The Institute of Contemporary British History (ICBH) joined us in September 2010, and it has close links with the Department of History, enabling you to take ICBH modules and participate in Institute activities.

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHoSTM)

The Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHoSTM) joined us in August 2013. The Centre is one of the most vibrant groups of historians devoted to the study of science, technology and medicine in the world, covering a wide chronological range, and concerned with global as well as national histories. You can take modules offered by CHoSTM and we will encourage you to attend their fortnightly seminar series.  

Course purpose

Provides a distinctive programme suitable both for those intending to proceed to a PhD and for those who wish to study modern history at an advanced level. Encourage a broad vision in study that escapes rigid divisions of country, period or discipline.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Full-time study: 4-8 hours of taught classes per week.

Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week.

Assessment

The taught compulsory and optional modules are assessed by coursework and/or take-home examination. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.



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This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural… Read more

This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world, offering you the opportunity to choose from a wide range of modules.

Leads to further research or careers in museums, journalism, finance and the cultural sector.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Kings is ranked in the top 6 in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).
  • A wide set of optional modules all taught by established experts in the field
  • A rigorous core course that trains students in historical research in archives, manuscripts, print and objects
  • Central London location and staff expertise offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture of seminars, workshops and conferences in the department and at the Institute of Historical Research, in which students are encouraged to participate.

Description

Our Early Modern History MA bridges the division between British and European history that exists on many courses, focusing on ways in which cultural, political and social themes stretch across the period c.1500–1800.

The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world. Their research connects the political and the social, the cultural and the religious dimensions of the early modern world, and our course will give you interdisciplinary perspectives on early modern history.

You will write a dissertation at the end of your course, but you will begin by testing concepts such as identity, mentality, religion; by challenging models of change including modernization, state-building, the civilising process, reformation, enlightenment and revolution; and by trying out different methodologies such as cultural history, gender, thinking with material objects, global history, using digital data.

Our optional modules offer you different perspectives on religion, society, politics and culture, by examining primary sources of all kinds alongside the most recent historiographical interpretations. We will also develop your practical skills through modules such as advanced historical skills, including palaeography, Latin from beginner to advanced levels, and offer the chance to learn a European language. The flexibility of the course means that you can also take relevant modules from other departments in, for example, early modern English or French literature, the Iberian world and Digital Humanities. You can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as Power, Culture and Belief in Europe 1500–1800 and Early Modern Britain 1500–1750.

You will have access to an excellent range of library resources. Our long-standing expertise in the early modern period means our library has an extensive collection of journals and books in this field. You can also use the British Library, Senate House Library (University of London) and the Institute of Historical Research. We provide access to the most significant online collections of primary printed material, Early English Books Online and the Eighteenth Century Online and to JSTOR and other online resources for secondary material.

Course purpose

The MA Early Modern History course offers a rigorous introduction to the advanced study of early modern history, providing training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study, but is also designed for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

We teach our modules through small seminar groups where we will debate and discuss ideas based on extensive reading.

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to nine hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 32 to 34 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 14 to 18 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation we will provide you with six hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 574 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess your performance through coursework and occasionally exams. The majority of the history modules are assessed by coursework essay; other optional modules may differ.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Read more

King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe.

This MA course gives you the skills and analysis you need for medieval historical study and delving into the significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women. It will also introduce you to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the Department of Digital Humanities where the digital and historical worlds meet.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the top five departments of history in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • International centre of excellence for the study of Medieval history.
  • Introduces students to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the Department of Digitial Humanities and King’s Digital Lab.
  • The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Description

 King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with traditional expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe, recently strengthened by the arrival of new members of staff.

The MA programme is amongst the most successful of its kind worldwide, teaching students the skills and analysis required for medieval historical study and delving into significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women.

The History department has traditional expertise in Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Major research projects in medieval history currently being undertaken by MA teaching staff include the AHRC-funded online databases Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (PASE) and Henry III Fine Rolls, an AHRC-funded project The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe and the Leverhulme Trust funded project Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066.

Institute of Historical Research (IHR)

We will encourage you to make full use of the opportunities available through the Institute of Historical Research (IHR). Many members of the Department prepare and deliver its period-based seminars, including the flourishing Early Medieval History and European History 1150-1550 seminars. In addition, the IHR offers a wide range of other events: from student-run workshops to specialist training days. This intersection between Department, School and the IHR means we have a uniquely productive environment for graduate study in History.

Course purpose

To train scholars moving into academic work after completing an undergraduate degree, but also for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

Course format and assessment

Students will take modules worth a minimum of 180 credits. Taught compulsory and optional modules assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a compulsory dissertation.

If you are a full-time student, we will give you four to eight hours of teaching through seminars, where you will contribute to the dicsussion and prepare presentations.

If you are a part-time studnet, we will give you two to six hours of teaching each week through seminars.

For your dissertation, we will give you six hours of supervision.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The majority of our modules are assessed through coursework. Your dissertation will be a 15,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Our graduates continue to further research or transfer their skills and knowledge to careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.



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This course offers you the chance to study the global, political, economic, and cultural interactions, the history of empires and the transnational histories of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas. Read more

This course offers you the chance to study the global, political, economic, and cultural interactions, the history of empires and the transnational histories of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas.

Since the 1920s, King’s College London has been a key international centre for Imperial and Global History. This MA course provides you with a core training in global and transnational history, while offering broad scope for personally-tailored interdisciplinary education, as you can choose four optional modules from those offered by any department at King’s College London, or from available MA courses at our London partner institutions (which include UCL, Queen Mary and Royal Holloway).

Leads to doctoral level research and careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)
  • The most comprehensive coverage of the history of the European seaborne empires of any university in the UK and has key figures in the study of South Asia, Australia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Description

This MA course provides you with training in global and transnational history, while offering you the opportunity to pursue a personally-tailored interdisciplinary education, through optional modules offered by any department at King’s College London, or from available MA courses at our London partner institutions. You will also be free to carry out your own research course, and to draw on an exceptional range of expertise within the World History research cluster at King’s, which includes experts on Africa, South Asia, China, Latin America and the Caribbean, Australia, and the Middle East, as well as leading historians of the British Empire, Portuguese Empire, and French Empire.

We aim to provide training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for further study, and also to allow you to develop special expertise in the areas of history and the humanities that attract you. Our course is particularly suitable if you have a clear research interest and are looking to continue in academic study.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will give you six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 34 hours of self-study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars in your first year and in your second and we will expect you to undertake 16 hours of self study in your first year and your second.

For the dissertation, we will give you six hours of supervision and we will expect you to undertake 594 hours of self-study both for full-time and part-time students.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

The majority of our modules are assessed through coursework essay, although this may be different for modules in other departments. The required 15,000-word dissertation enables you to research a topic of your choice.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. Read more

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.
  • Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy and papyrology.

This course is ideal if you have previous training in a related subject in the humanities.

Course purpose

For students whose previous training has been in a related subject in the humanities. To give a grounding in the subject, normally with a language-training element in medieval Greek or Latin.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will give you six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of self-study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of self-study.

For your dissertation, we will give five hours of supervision each year, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of self-study.

Assessment

We will assess you through a combination of coursework and examinations. Typically, we will assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or three-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000-words of coursework, or a combination of coursework and examination. You will take 180 credits of modules over your programme.

Your dissertation will be a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Some of our graduates continue their research in our department and elsewhere in the UK, EU and US. Others transfer the skills and knowledge they develop to careers in teaching, cultural management, general management, civil service and banking. 



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Our Eighteenth Century Studies course is co- taught with the British Museum in London and by lecturers from eight different departments across Arts & Humanities, making it a truly multi-faceted degree, looking at all aspects of the eighteenth century. . Read more

Our Eighteenth Century Studies course is co- taught with the British Museum in London and by lecturers from eight different departments across Arts & Humanities, making it a truly multi-faceted degree, looking at all aspects of the eighteenth century. 

You can explore the Enlightenment through race, gender, class, intellectual networks and material culture; analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts and have access to unique, diverse and rich collections in central London, all close to King’s, including the National Portrait Gallery, the Royal Society, the Foundling Museum, and Sir John Soane’s Museum.

Key benefits

  • Joint degree with the British Museum
  • Unrivalled access to British Museum expertise
  • Unrivalled location for access to London's cultural collections
  • Located in the heart of London

Description

Our Eighteenth Century Studies MA is offered jointly by King’s and the British Museum. This collaboration means that we can draw on the expertise of scholars from eight Departments in the School of Humanities at King’s, and senior staff at the British Museum to offer exciting opportunities to explore 18th century textual, material and visual cultures. This MA consists of a required module, adissertation and (normally) four modules chosen from a wide range of options, including modules taught by the Departments of English, History, Comparative Literature, French, German, Music and Philosophy. The required module is taught in part by experts from the British Museum, with special reference to the Enlightenment Gallery and its history.

The required module Representing the Eighteenth Century explores constructions of Enlightenment, then and now, through frameworks such as race, gender, class, the body and intellectual networks. You will learn about the ideas of the Enlightenment and how it has been regarded subsequently. We will teach you how to analyse ideas, objects, texts and arts of the 18th century and, thanks to our unique collaboration with the British Museum, you will have the opportunity to research a wealth of 18th century materials under the guidance of world-leading curators and experts.

Course purpose

Provides teaching and research training in a wide variety of disciplines relating to the study of the 18th century. As the course will be offered jointly with the British Museum special emphasis will be placed on relevant collections held by that institution. Includes opportunities for training in any of the basic technical skills necessary for those who wish to go on to study for a PhD in 18th century subjects.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week. We expect you to undertake an additional 34 hours of self-study each week.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with four hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week in your first year, and two to four hours per week in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 23 hours of independent study each week in your first year and 11 hours in your second.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess our modules entirely through coursework, normally in the form of a 4,000-word essays. Your dissertation will consist of a 15,000-word essay.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England



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Our Medieval Studies MA draws on the expertise of a wide range of departments to enable you to study the period from a variety of perspectives. Read more

Our Medieval Studies MA draws on the expertise of a wide range of departments to enable you to study the period from a variety of perspectives. In addition to a huge choice of optional modules, we offer a module taught in partnership with the British Museum, drawing on its world-famous collection. This wide-ranging course allows you to build a study pathway that reflects your own particular interests and to develop a specialism exploring a theme or topic in your master’s dissertation.

Key benefits

  • Unrivalled location, gives students access to major libraries, institutes and societies for medievalists.
  • Flexible combination of core skills and training modules.
  • Unique range of specialist options, allowing interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study.

Description

This Medieval Studies MA which draws on our strengths in medieval teaching in departments including Classics, Digital Humanities, English, French, German, History, Music and Theology. The required module Visual and Verbal in Medieval Culture, partly taught in the British Museum, offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the multi-media Middle Ages, especially the relationship between text and image. You will also be able to choose taught modules from an extensive options list, including skills modules in languages, Palaeography and Digital Humanities. We are also able to draw on the expertise of Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies academics to offer you an exceptional geographical and historical range.

Our definition of the Middle Ages extends from the late antique to the early renaissance periods, and covers eastern as well as western Europe. You will study medieval literature, languages, history, art and philosophy within a historicist framework, which will train you in a range of methodologies, from the traditional skills of palaeography and codicology to the theoretical tools of gender, sexuality and postcolonial studies. With huge flexibility and choice of module, you will be able to tailor your degree to your own interests, to the extent that no two Medieval Studies MAs are alike. At the end of the course you will bring all of the skills and knowledge you have developed to produce a 15,000-word dissertation on a subject of your choice.

You will automatically become a member of the Centre for Medieval Studies and you will be invited to take part in its activities, by attending and assisting at conferences and research events, and participating in staff-student study days.

Course purpose

To deepen subject knowledge and develop skills in research methods, critical analysis and judgement. To provide training in techniques required for advanced study and to offer opportunities for specialist work.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will give you six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures, seminars and skills workshops, and we will expect you to undertake 34 hours of self-study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you four hours each week through lectures and seminars in your first year and two to four in your second, and we will expect you to undertake 23 hours of self-study in your first year, and 11 in your second.

Assessment

You are assessed through a combination of coursework and exams. For your dissertation, you will write a 15,000-word essay.

Career prospects

The Medieval Studies MA can lead to a variety of career and study options including teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries or to further research.



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This course offers you the chance to study Contemporary British History at an advanced level in a strong research environment in central… Read more

This course offers you the chance to study Contemporary British History at an advanced level in a strong research environment in central London where you can choose from a wide range of options taught by experts in the field. It also includes economic, social, cultural, political and diplomatic history. Our unique course covering contemporary historiography and research methods leads to careers in research, journalism, the civil service, politics, teaching and finance.

Key benefits

  • Comparative approach to contemporary British history.
  • Our unique location in the heart of the British administrative centre with unrivalled access to library and archival resources and easy access to resources in Europe, as well as a wide range of contemporary history experts.
  • You attend regular research seminars in contemporary British history and have full access to the Institute of Contemporary British History’s (ICBH) other exciting activities, such as our oral history programme, history & policy, conferences and research projects.
  • Our annual residential workshop for ICBH MA and PhD students at Cumberland Lodge, Windsor Great Park.
  • Our specialist historiography and research methods course for contemporary history, including oral history, and expert dissertation supervision in contemporary political, economic, social and diplomatic history.

Description

Our Contemporary British History course will provide you with training in and experience of the historical analysis of issues that are central to understanding contemporary Britain. While we focus on the study of British history over the past century, we also recognise that you can’t understand British history without reference to other countries and regions, in particular the Empire/Commonwealth, Europe and North America.

Alongside teaching you the techniques, skills and knowledge relevant to your interests and research needs, we will equip you for both independent research and analysis in primary and secondary material, and train you to write at an advanced level. We will foster your intellectual development and independent learning ability, which you will need to continue your own professional and personal development.

Course purpose

To provide you with a distinctive programme with which to proceed on to a PhD and to study contemporary British history at an advanced level, preparing you for a career both in academia and/or in journalism, the civil service, consultancy, teaching, publishing and elsewhere.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 34 hours of independent study alongside this.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours a week of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and two to four hours in your second year. Alongside this we will expect you to undertake 24 hours a week of independent study in your first year and 12-24 hours in your second year.

For your dissertation we will provide six hours of supervision and we will expect you to undertake 500-600 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess the majority of our modules through coursework, although modules from other departments may differ. We will assess your dissertation module through a 15-000 word essay.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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Our MA in Politics & Contemporary History provides you with an advanced critical study of the government and politics of contemporary Britain. Read more

Our MA in Politics & Contemporary History provides you with an advanced critical study of the government and politics of contemporary Britain. It develops the knowledge, techniques and skills relevant to your interests and research needs, and equips you for independent research and analysis and for writing at an advanced level. 

Key benefits

  • Study contemporary history and politics in the heart of London, with unrivalled access to archives and libraries.
  • Course tutors include renowned experts in the field of contemporary history and politics.
  • You attend regular research seminars in contemporary British history and have full access to other exciting activities, including witness seminars, conferences and research projects.

Description

You are required to take modules on the Evolution of British Government and British Political History since 1945, as well as choosing from a range of optional modules.

You are given the opportunity to experience the Department of Political Economy’s work with policymakers and politicians through History & Policy, as well as regular research seminars, conferences and other events which you can attend.

Course purpose

The course prepares you for advanced research and/or work in political, policy and related fields.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

You will typically have 20 hours per 20-credit taught module, as well as 180 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will have 8 hours of dissertation supervision to complement the 592 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Most 20-credit modules are assessed by a 5,000-word essay. The dissertation module is assessed by a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

After studying this course you can go on to a career in journalism, the civil service, management consultancy, teaching and research.



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