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University of Brighton, Full Time MA Degrees

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The Masters in Architectural and Urban Design (formerly Urban Studies) at University of Brighton brings critical debate together with creative practice, helping to develop you as one of those designers who will plan the urban environments of the future. Read more
The Masters in Architectural and Urban Design (formerly Urban Studies) at University of Brighton brings critical debate together with creative practice, helping to develop you as one of those designers who will plan the urban environments of the future. You will engage with critical thinking and research based on the analysis of cities and will develop your own projects, speculating as to how cities will evolve and be used in the future.

If you are looking to change or develop your career, or wish to extend your knowledge in both architecture and design, the MA Architectural and Urban Design gives you a deep understanding of the issues involved in contemporary practice and allows you to evolve your own specialist work. Our former students have gone on to be professional architects, academics and urban designers.

You will benefit from a supportive studio environment, two field trips and a variety of workshops and seminars. Your lecturers are expert practitioners in architecture and urban design as well as experienced teachers.

Work is of a highly experimental nature that stretches your imagination and critical ability. You will produce innovative portfolios, critical writing and develop awareness of issues in global urban environments, expanding your knowledge beyond the usual architectural boundaries.

Full course details available at http://arts.brighton.ac.uk

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We aim to develop a research-led education, where practices of rigorous inquiry permeate every part of what we do. Introduction. The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) RIBA Part II Course is a highly creative, research-led professional two year masters course rooted in Studio Laboratories driven by individual enquiry. Read more
We aim to develop a research-led education, where practices of rigorous inquiry permeate every part of what we do.

Introduction

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) RIBA Part II Course is a highly creative, research-led professional two year masters course rooted in Studio Laboratories driven by individual enquiry. The M.Arch course is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA, giving exemption from RIBA Part II.

We are based in the heart of the vibrant Faculty of Arts. Founded in 1859 as the School of Art, it offers an inspirational creative context for nurturing excellence in our work. Our distinct research-led approach filters through all aspects of the course, with rigorous inquiry fusing innovation, regulation and social commentary. This student focussed approach offers the opportunity for you to investigate your personal architectural agenda, developing your own critical position and design language prior to entry into the profession.

The Studio Laboratories are driven by tutors’ personal research agendas and all are actively engaged within this field of enquiry as academics or practitioners. The stimulating mix of practitioners and academics across the course builds conversations, with visiting lecturers and critics further feeding the dialogue. Recent visiting lecturers have included Neil Denari, Perry Kulper, Chris Thurlbourne, Michael Jemtrud, and our close links with practice ensure stimulating review panels. We place critical thought at our core and look forward to you joining the conversation.


Professional accreditation
Successful completion of the MArch carries ARB/RIBA Part 2 exemption. In addition, the University of Brighton offers the Management Law and Practice in Architecture postgraduate diploma (Part 3) as the final stage towards the professional title of architect.
As Part 1 exemption is not a prerequisite for Part 2, we are able to accept applications for the MArch programme from students who have a degree in architecture, or a closely related subject, but who do not have a Part 1 qualification. Students in this position are expected to take the Part 1 examination independently. All applicants ultimately seeking to register with the ARB are still required to have satisfied all Parts 1, 2, and 3.

Course structure
The first year in the MArch comprises the main taught input for technology, via precedent studies, lectures, case studies and seminars, and an in-depth research-based history and theory course. The main design project is undertaken in terms 2 and 3, building on research-based design work in term 1, where technology supports design ambitions to satisfy Part 2 criteria. In the second year students are increasingly expected to lead the studio culture with advanced research initiatives and design agendas. Part 2 criteria related to design, professional studies, technology and history and theory are all covered in this year.

Areas of study
Students work on a common, issue-based brief in different tutor groups for the entire academic year. Technology, professional studies and history and theory courses are delivered through lectures, seminars and workshops from academics, practitioners and specialists that support the development of design projects.

Syllabus
Design Studies (with integrated CAD and communication studies)_
Design Technology
Architectural History and Theory
Professional Studies

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This course maintains a balance between highly individual development in studio/design practice and a wider creative context. Read more
This course maintains a balance between highly individual development in studio/design practice and a wider creative context. Core studies consist of initial research and development of a proposed project, supported by individual tutorials, seminars, work-in-progress presentations and a programme of lectures given by respected practitioners, historians, critics and other arts and design professionals. All key course events are scheduled on Wednesdays.

Recent participants have been architects, ceramicists, fashion designers, typographers, performance artists, researchers in sustainable design, jewellers, book artists and interactive designers.

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Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing. Read more
Community psychology brings social change to the forefront of the way that we understand and promote psychological wellbeing.

The central focus of this course is to provide knowledge and training platforms that allow you to work towards addressing the institutional marginalisation and disempowerment that drives local and global community issues. It introduces critical, liberation and human rights perspectives, reflecting on traditional modes of scientific enquiry and what they mean for groups and individuals struggling with issues of marginalisation.

Our degree programme is among the few in the country that allow you to work directly with local communities to facilitate social change. With the help of our award-winning Community University Partnership Programme (Cupp), it gives you the opportunity to apply your skills as a psychologist and gain professional experience in the field.

This course will be of particular interest to those interested in developing a career in mental health.

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On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession. Read more
On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession.

Based within a thriving art college environment at the university's central Brighton Grand Parade campus, you will learn from experienced professionals in a welcoming atmosphere that allows craftspeople to discuss and develop their ideas as a community.

You will develop both your creative skills and your ways of thinking. You will work with people who understand craft both as a profession and as a personal expression. Your options within this specialist course can include extensive work with a wide range of materials and professions, with expert provision across metal, ceramics, polymers, wood and more.

Throughout the course you'll be doing research and experimentation using innovative thinking and approaches to craft practice. To get your masters degree, you'll demonstrate both how you work and how you think as a craftsperson, with an extended essay and craft-in-context modules allowing you to develop your ideas around your own practice and the wider context of your craft.

Our MA strives to help you towards exemplary creative output. Through exploration of the traditional discipline categories to the evolution of future interpretations and directions, you will be encouraged to fully engage with what the craft scene is today.

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At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Read more
At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Working with professional writers, you will develop your skills to produce and share stories in a variety of genres.

Through creative workshops, you will partner with supportive lecturers and interdisciplinary postgraduate groups to develop advanced theories and practices that relate to the creative writing process. Both people with and without experience of creative writing should consider applying for this course, which aims to prepare you for a career as a freelancer or portfolio worker.

We have fantastic links with local publishers, writers and creative companies and offer a unique salon series where industry experts offer practical advice and insights. In semester two, you will apply your writing and creative practice in a workplace scenario, while being encouraged to work on your own interests and passions.

If you want to share your work, you have the opportunity to do so through our established student-led anthologies and open mic nights, which form part of Brighton's thriving creative scene.

Areas of study

You will be able to tailor your MA studies to reflect an interest in writing practice, literary theory, community engagement or any combination of these.

We identify the range of modules as intrinsic to catering to diverse creative and intellectual needs and understand that triggers for writing and creative practice can stem from a wide range of places and fields of study.

We have specific modules dedicated to engaging students with the wider Brighton community and local creative industries where they will become a writer in residence and work to link their individual creative practice with a professional scenario.

You will be able to identify teaching and learning opportunities that inspire your creative work and apply this to your professional, academic and personal development and planning.

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The Cultural and Critical Theory MA will give you a sophisticated appreciation of the limits of human understanding, the interdependence of philosophy and theory, and the implications of these for political action, aesthetic sensibility and representation in art and activism. Read more
The Cultural and Critical Theory MA will give you a sophisticated appreciation of the limits of human understanding, the interdependence of philosophy and theory, and the implications of these for political action, aesthetic sensibility and representation in art and activism.

The course offers three distinct pathways:

- Aesthetics and Cultural Theory
- Globalisation, Politics and Culture
- Philosophy and Critical Theory

All pathways provide for the development of an advanced understanding of specialist areas in cultural and critical theory, and effective preparation for doctoral research.

The core course, delivered during the autumn and spring terms, is complemented by a research methods module and two elective modules that offer opportunities for study across the range of humanities provision.

The course culminates in the submission of a specialist 20,000-word (or equivalent) project, which allows you to apply your advanced philosophical and theoretical understanding to an issue or text of your choice.

Taught courses are delivered with a maximum size of 12 students. Supervision for the project, and for pre and post-essay tutorials, is on a one-to-one basis with the appropriate tutor.

Areas of study

Delivered during the autumn and spring terms, the core course consists of a common lecture line and two modules in aesthetics and cultural theory, philosophy and critical theory, or political and cultural globalisation, depending on your chosen specialist area.

You also take a research methods module, which prepares you for the research project by considering the various approaches taken by relevant disciplines, interrogating the requirements of MA-level research and addressing how your intended research topic might best be refined.

The project itself normally consists of 18-20,000 word dissertation (or 12,000 words alongside a video, an installation or studio-based work) in which you apply your knowledge of cultural or critical theory to an issue or text of your choosing. Your work towards this submission is supported by one-to-one project supervision.

The elective modules can take one of three forms:

- a module from another MA course in the humanities programme, or from elsewhere in the College of Arts and Humanities
- a Higher Education Teaching and Learning Course in which you shadow a tutor in the delivery of a module on the undergraduate programme
- a 10,000-word extended essay with regular one-to-one tutorial supervision.

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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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The Digital Media Arts MA is delivered at the University of Brighton and at the Lighthouse Media Centre. Work at Lighthouse bridges the arts, education and industry sectors, bringing together professional and cultural organisations and individuals, not only across the region but internationally. Read more
The Digital Media Arts MA is delivered at the University of Brighton and at the Lighthouse Media Centre. Work at Lighthouse bridges the arts, education and industry sectors, bringing together professional and cultural organisations and individuals, not only across the region but internationally.

The course has been developed in the context of Brighton’s status as one of the main centres of the media economy. It provides the production skills, and develops the individual approaches and bodies of work, required for success in this fast-moving, competitive industry, as well as exploring the increasingly important areas of education and convergence.

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This MA course has emerged as a direct result of our work with local practitioners and senior leaders in educational establishments. Read more

Overview

This MA course has emerged as a direct result of our work with local practitioners and senior leaders in educational establishments. The course builds on existing structures to further integrate academic study with work-based learning and research.

The revised structure ensures a coherent and supportive student experience throughout the programme which comprises of core modules that can be applied in a variety of different areas.

Our programme reflects the expectation that practitioners work in wider networks with colleagues and alongside expert facilitators, including the university teaching team. A key premise of this programme is its flexibility. You can tailor the syllabus to allow you to pursue individual interests and professional development needs across the entire course.

Studying with us, you will graduate with an in-depth and critical understanding of theory and research. The focus is on learning and teaching in a breadth of educational contexts which are responsive to individual students’ circumstances, settings and situations and modules are designed to complement and extend professional commitments. Teaching and assignment submissions are scheduled to fit around your existing work.

The course takes one year of full-time study or up to three years of part-time study to complete depending on any
level-7 credits gained from prior learning. To graduate with an Education MA you need to achieve a total of 180 credits.

Course structure

The flexibility of our programme means that studying for the Education MA allows you to pursue your individual interests and professional development needs across the entire course.

The number of modules taken enables a manageable workload as well as further opportunities for formative assessment.

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, taught sessions, tutorials, online learning, group work, independent study and through work-related activities.

Areas of study

You will begin the programme with a focus on current issues reflecting on roles, responsibilities and interests. You will be supported to explore these issues from prospective within the broader context of policy and current research.

Subsequently, you will undertake critical thinking about practice, teaching and learning that will lead to an enquiry into an issue of professional relevance. This enquiry is a helpful and formative small-scale project which acts as a useful preparation before starting work on you MA thesis. The outcomes of the enquiry are intended to have a direct impact on pupils, colleagues and the wider education field, in addition to your own professional understanding.

Aims

Students on this course will:
•develop systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of debates and developments in education as a field of study
•undertake systematic and critical reflection and debate in the light of current and emerging policy contexts
•engender an understanding of and commitment to professional learning and development and its place for the practitioner and subsequent practice
•develop a thorough understanding of the principles of research in the context of learning and development to facilitate research literacy
•develop conceptual understanding that enables critical evaluation of current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline and evaluation of methodologies
•develop skills, knowledge and understandings and apply this learning to current / future roles, responsibilities and career aspirations

Career Opportunities

This course will further your professional development, allow you to progress your expertise within the field of education and enhance your employability for leadership roles.

Enhanced knowledge of educational issues and specialist areas of interest are attractive to a wide range of employers and typical career moves after graduation include promotion to senior leadership teams, advisory roles or promotion into a different education sector including those with capacity to influence policy.

Our graduates have commented on the ways that the MA in Education has positioned them for senior and leadership roles, for making a career move and improving their skills and professional potential.

The course also provides a springboard for further study at a doctoral level, either through PhD or EdD routes.

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This programme is designed for students with a particular interest in linguistics or English language, gained through, for example, previous undergraduate level study or appropriate experience in areas such as linguistics, English language, English literature, philosophy, sociology or other related areas such politics, history, cultural theory, teaching English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for students with a particular interest in linguistics or English language, gained through, for example, previous undergraduate level study or appropriate experience in areas such as linguistics, English language, English literature, philosophy, sociology or other related areas such politics, history, cultural theory, teaching English as a foreign language.

There are three complementary routes through the programme:

The MA in Linguistics equips students with knowledge of critical theory in the area of theoretical linguistics and philosophy of language, more specifically the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface, and grammar.

The MA in English Language offers students the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts. Students explore the English language from several perspectives: language variation and language attitudes, language and identity, language in interaction and cross-cultural communication.

The MRes (Master of Research) in Linguistics is designed for students who already have some background in linguistics, and who intend to progress to PhD study. It is designed as an enhanced route of entry to a PhD programme: it gives students an opportunity to develop research skills early on in order to prepare for doctoral research.

The programme also equips students with high level research skills and a sound basis in theory. The dissertation allows students to address an issue from their disciplinary specialism with the experience of having studied a range of areas of enquiry from different modules. Students write up dissertations equipped with appropriate research skills and knowledge provided by their chosen programme of study.
Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester. The sessions are held on a weekly basis and are timetabled to accommodate both full-time and part-time students. The programme offers opportunities for study within a flexible framework that can fit in with students' professional and personal commitments.

In addition, students are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in their subject area. Students are offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.
Areas of study

The programme is comprised of the following subject areas:
Semantics (lexical semantics)
Pragmatics: minimalism and contextualism
Philosophy of language
English grammar
Language variation and language attitudes
Language and identity: social class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks
Language in interaction: linguistic politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication
Feminist theory and linguistic theory
Ethnocentrism and racial prejudices in colonial discourse

Linguistics students approach the study of these areas by:
- analysing and evaluating different approaches to studying the structure of the English language
- engaging with theoretical frameworks which attempt to account for meaning in language
- examining the relationship between philosophy of language and linguistics, and the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language.

English language students approach the study of these areas by:
- examining theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation, language contact, language and identity
- analysing the role of language in social relationships and practices
- examining how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

Optional subject areas
Students on the MA Linguistics programme may choose to follow one of the option modules, Discourses of Culture or Topics in Sociolinguistics, or one of the Cultural and Critical Theory modules.

Students on the MA English Language programme may choose to follow one of the option modules, Semantics/pragmatics interface: approaches to the study of meaning or Discourses of Culture or one of the Cultural and Critical Theory modules.

Students on the MRes Linguistics have an opportunity to shape their research degree based on their particular interests within linguistics, including research modules.

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Founded on a strong dynamic between students and staff, the Fine Art MA is for disciplined artists who want to develop their work both through personal tutorials and interaction within an informed, ambitious peer group. Read more
Founded on a strong dynamic between students and staff, the Fine Art MA is for disciplined artists who want to develop their work both through personal tutorials and interaction within an informed, ambitious peer group.

The course is taught by a group of experienced and well-connected artists and curators. You follow a highly personalised programme of study and contribute to the overall group experience in a weekly series of lectures, seminars and crits.

You will have the opportunity to exhibit your work and curate group exhibitions, while also completing an extended essay and slide presentation for your assessment and as the basis of your future professional practice.

The Fine Art MA is well respected for cultivating skilled and thoughtful artists.

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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more
This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics.

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
receive close tutorial support.
be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

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The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Read more
The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Emphasis is placed on the design, production, diffusion and consumption of domestic goods - whether for elite markets or everyday use - rather than capital goods. Approaches to the history of the decorative arts and design are inter-disciplinary and make use of methodological developments in ethnography, gender studies, economic history and other academic fields. Students can either pick a specialist or generalist pathway on this programme to suit their own specific interests, depending upon their personal choice of essay and dissertation research directions.

The University of Brighton is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading institutions for the study of the history of decorative arts and design. This course is the only MA in the field based in a school which gained a grade 5 in the national Research Assessment Exercise, an indication of international excellence.

The course draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history. The department is based in a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion of Brighton constructed in the late eighteenth-early nineteenth century period, close to Brighton's famous sea front and in the heart of the city.

Career and progression opportunities
The course has a healthy employment record, many graduates taking up careers in museums, galleries, arts administration, auction houses, journalism, publishing and education. Others study for further professional qualifications or postgraduate study.

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During semester 1 the projects set for the preliminary design module provide an opportunity for students returning to education to take stock of their position, to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and to identify ambitions for future study. Read more
During semester 1 the projects set for the preliminary design module provide an opportunity for students returning to education to take stock of their position, to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and to identify ambitions for future study. Lecture courses in Technology, Critical Readings and Research Methods run in parallel. By semester 2, work undertaken for the main design module consolidates and extends the priorities, ideas and strategies established in the preliminary design. A proposal for the final research project is developed and submitted. The whole of semester 3 is taken up by a self-directed research project, the Master Work.

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