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University College London, Full Time MA Degrees

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Advanced Educational Practice MA has been developed to enable participants to reflect on their own practice, taking a professional academic approach. Read more
Advanced Educational Practice MA has been developed to enable participants to reflect on their own practice, taking a professional academic approach. The programme’s presentation is either fully online for individual students or mixed mode for those joining an MA school-based cohort group (minimum of 12 participants).

Degree information

This programme has been developed to respond to educational practitioner needs in both UK and International settings.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

The PG Diploma is awarded for 120 credits in any available modules. The PG Certificate is awarded for 60 credits in any available modules.

Core modules
There is only one true core module for the MA Advanced Educational Practice which is a research methodology module, usually completed before or alongside the dissertation or report thesis. Students are encouraged to identify a theme to study compatible modules up to 60 credits which can be taken from any 'core' module listed below.
-The Action Researcher: exploring issues and contexts (the 'core' module)
-Teacher as Author: curriculum design and development
-Supporting Learners and Learning
-Developing Mentoring Practices
-Independent Study Module
-Assessing Colleagues' Learning
-Developing the Role of the Tutor

Optional modules
The optional modules for the MA Advanced Educational Practice are any of the available modules within the programme (as listed below) or any UCL Institute of Education modules residing in other MA programmes. These are only available at the discretion of the Module Leader and the Advanced Educational Practice Programme Leader.
-Independent Study module
-Developing the Role of the Tutor
-Supporting Learners and Learning
-Teacher as Author: Curriculum Design and Development
-Assessing Colleagues' Learning
-Developing Mentoring Practices
-Participants may also bring 60 credits into this MA from successful completion of a PGCE (Primary, Secondary or Post-Compulsory routes).

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates either in a report of 10,000 words (30 credits) or a dissertation of 20,000 words (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
All modules are taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. All participants are assessed through coursework (which may be a long essay, portfolio or presentation) at the end of each module and receive both formative written assessment on a draft and summative written assessment following final submission.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is ranked first in the world for education for the third year running (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2016) and first in the UK for research strength (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

This programme has been developed to respond to educational practitioner needs in both UK and International settings.

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of three distinct pathways. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university, and offer a unique opportunity to choose one of three distinct pathways. In the African Studies with Education MA students will come to understand some of the challenges surrounding education in contemporary Africa - including poverty, inequality, gender, education and employment, education and technology; vernacular education and the diaspora.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present. In addition, the Education pathway explores aspects of education and learning, through a bespoke 'African Studies and Education' core module and a range of advanced optional modules drawn from the UCL Institute of Education and other UCL departments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
- Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
- Debating Africa's Future
- African Studies and Education

Optional modules:
Students choose three from a range of optional modules including the following:
- Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
- Planning for Education and Development
- Education, Conflict and Fragility
- Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
- Education in Muslim Communities
- Gender, Education and Development
- Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation
- Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
- Cultural Memory and Identity
- Research Methods in African Studies
- Performance, Visual Media and Popular Culture in Africa
- Archaeology and Education

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up diverse positions within education-related organisations, national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, or within national ministries and the public sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, environmental data analysis and GIS, archival work, ethnographic field techniques and presentation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study education as it relates to the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent. This expertise is combined with that of the world-leading UCL Institute of Education to provide unparralleled insight into education policy and practice.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree. The new African Studies and Education pathway has been co-developped with the UCL Institute of Education and draws on the University's core stregths in teaching and reseach on education in Africa.

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
-Debating Africa's Future
-Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules - students choose three from a range of options including the following:
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

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The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more
The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

Degree information

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules - options include the following (for a list of what is available in any given year please see our departmental website page):
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East
-The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
-Economic and Social History of Archaic and Classical Greece
-Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
-Greek and Latin language at various levels
-Greek Epigraphy
-Greek Historiography
-Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
-Greek Papyrology
-Latin Epigraphy
-Lived Religion in Ancient Greece
-The Making of the Christian Empire AD 284-425
-Persepolis (King's College London)
-Propaganda and Ideology in Rome
-Roman Britain (King's College London)
-Roman Egypt

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in the field of Ancient History, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held in other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Admissions, Unspecified International School in London
-Consulting Intern, Oracle Corporation
-Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
-Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police
-Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

Employability
Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

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This MA explores language from a wide range of perspectives. Read more
This MA explores language from a wide range of perspectives. It is designed to develop understanding of key concepts and issues related to applied linguistics and English language education globally, while also engaging students in the theoretical and empirical investigation of real-world situations, contexts and issues in which language plays a crucial role.

Degree information

This programme will provide students with insight into applied linguistics and language education from global, bilingual, cognitive, discourse, and socio-cultural perspectives. It will also develop students' capacity to analyse, evaluate and synthesise primary and secondary sources as well as helping them to design research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

For a PG Diploma the requirement is one core module (30 credits) and three optional modules (90 credits). For a PG Certificate the requirement is one core module (30 credits) and two optional modules (60 credits).

Core module - the core module for the MA Applied Linguistics is Discourse, Society and Culture (30 credits):
-Discourse, Society and Culture

Optional modules (indicative list) - up to 90 credits of options drawn from the following:
-English in Diverse World Contexts
-Fundamentals of Second and Foreign Language Teaching
-Intercultural Communication
-Language and Identity
-Language Teacher Identity and Development
-Language Testing
-Materials Development for Language Teaching
-The Multilingual Classroom
-Second Language Acquisition
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Contemporary Issues in English Education
-Early Childhood Education
-Internet Cultures: Theory and Practice
-Literacy Development
-Perspectives on Adult Literacy, Language and Numeracy
-Technology and Education Beyond the Classroom
-Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
-Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties (dyslexia) Module I

Dissertation/research project
All students are required to write a 2,500-word research proposal which leads to the submission of a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic in applied linguistics.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, projects, supervisory tutorials, student presentations, and student-led discussions. Within tutor-led sessions, students often engage in individual, pair and group tasks which are then fed back to the plenary. Students are assessed through written coursework, oral presentation, and the dissertation. Alternative modes of assessment may be a feature of some modules.

Careers

Graduates of this programme include university and college lecturers, senior managers and directors of study in private and state sector schools, textbook and materials writers, editors and publishers, education journalists, NGO project officers, education consultants, policy advisers and researchers, and consultants in the aviation industry.

Employability
This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, but is also popular with students wishing to go into education or develop their career internationally. Small group discussions and debates on the programme help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills. Likewise, the analytical and research skills gained by students are highly valued by employers from a range of sectors. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they here, for example departmental talks and other networking opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Culture, Communication and Media (CCM) is committed to excellence in teaching, research and consultancy across a range of areas including applied linguistics.

One of the key aims of UCL Institute of Education’s Centre for Applied Linguistics is to seek external funding for high-quality research and consultancy in the broad field of applied linguistics, including discourse analysis, bilingualism and multilingualism, second language acquisition, intercultural communication, linguistic ethnography, semiotics, and language-in-education policy and practice, and undertake such research.

It also aims to provide research input into teaching programmes and doctoral supervision in areas of applied linguistics and global English language education.

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The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. Read more
The Archaeology MA is an intensive induction programme on current archaeological theory and interpretive trends which equips students to undertake research in their chosen field. The flexible programme of study serves as an excellent expansion of undergraduate studies or as a self-designed foundation for further postgraduate and professional work.

Degree information

The programme provides a wide-ranging introduction to archaeology as a comparative, anthropologically-informed, and socially-situated discipline. Students develop critically aware perspectives on archaeological practice and research processes and gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to the collection, analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. The programme is extremely flexible, with a wide choice of options available allowing students to tailor the programme to their own interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Issues

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's programme options available at the UCL Institute of archaeology. Some of the most popular choices include:
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
-Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Archaeology of Buddhism
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Archaeometallurgy: Metallic Artefacts
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African political complexities
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Funerary Archaeology
-Interpreting Pottery
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
-Medieval Archaeology: Select Topics and Current Problems
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies
-Rock Art Studies: Theories, Methods and Management

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The core module is seminar based, and the sessions are interactive, with an emphasis on student participation and critical discussion. The optional modules are delivered through seminars, lectures, practicals, laboratory sessions, tutorials, and site and museum visits, as appropriate for specific modules. Assessment is through essays, oral examination and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued an incredibly wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. Recent graduate career destinations include: excavator for a private archaeological contractor, education officer, and intern at a national museum. Several students each year normally continue on to PhD studies at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Doctoral Researcher, Graduate School of Human Development in Landscape
-Head of Corporate Legal, Fidelity
-Freelance Archaeologist, Murray Archaeological Services
-MPhil/PhD Archaeology, University College London (UCL)
-Humanities Lecturer, Cirencester College and studying PTLLS (Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector), Cirencester College

Employability
As the most general of the MA/MSc programmes, the experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, developing experise in the archaeology of specific regions, periods or themes, or specific field, museum and analytical skills. All students acquire a detailed understanding of specific theoretical debates and the critical skills to evaluate existing arguments and interpretations and to develop their own research, develop a range of research skills, and design and carry through original research. Taught from a comparative anthropological perspective, understanding cultural differences, in the past and present, is fundamental.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and one of the most highly regarded centres for archaeology, archaeological science, cultural heritage and museum studies in Britain, highlighted by its top position in university assessments and National Student Survey results. It is one of the very few departments in the world undertaking research on a truly global scale. Its degrees offer an unrivalled variety of modules. The institute hosts events on many different aspects of archaeology and is linked to heritage organisations, museums and archaeological societies, providing an outstanding research environment for students.

It is truly international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the world.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections constitute a resource of international importance for research.

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This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia. Read more
This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia.

Degree information

The aim of this programme is to develop a comparative appreciation of the cultural histories and heritage of Asia, moving chronologically from early human history, through movements towards the Neolithic, and the rise of cities and states, to the present day by looking at current debates around conservation ethics, reconstruction and authenticity of archaeological remains.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Archaeological Heritage Management in Asia

Optional modules - students take three further optional modules to the value of 45 credits. These can be selected from the outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, but for this degree, the normal choices include:
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeology of Buddhism
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Memory
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Public Archaeology
-Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays, PowerPoint presentations, supervised independent research project and dissertation, and an oral viva towards the end of the degree.

Careers

Graduates of this new programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Employability
The experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, practical elements and dissertation, but in general we expect students to develop expertise in the archaeology of specific regions of Asia (in particular East Asia, South Asia, Central Asia and to some extent South–East Asia) and a broader comparative, international perspective on that region of Asia. Students gain knowledge of both current scholarly debates in archaeology as well as heritage management issues. We expect students from this programme to be prepared for job in the archaeological services or heritage organizations on Asian countries or to be well-prepared for doctoral studies focused on one or more parts of Asia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is unique in training pan-Asian specialists – escaping traditional study area boundaries where China, India, South–East and Central Asia are studied on their own – and conducting inter-regional dialogue on the human past.

Students are given the opportunity to develop depth of expertise in a particular region in Asia while benefiting from an innovative macro-regional comparative perspective.

This MA focuses on the development of human societies and civilisations in a part of the world which is becoming increasingly influential in world affairs but has been under-represented in most general and regional archaeological programmes.

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UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research. Read more
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research.

Degree information

UCL’s wide range of archaeological expertise provides a unique opportunity to study Egypt and the Near East in a truly comparative context, and for students to develop a programme and research dissertation tailored to individual interests. These may include the application of new skills in archaeological science, exploring new theoretical perspectives, or the significance of archaeology for the wider cultural heritage of these regions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), two or three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation.

Core modules - all students must take the following:
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules
-Ancient Cyprus: Colonisations, Copper and City-States (by arrangement with King's College London)
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and debates
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approached
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Introductory Akkadian (by arrangement with SOAS)
-Mediterranean Dynamics
-Mediterranean Prehistory
-Middle Egyptian Language
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies
-Subject to approval a third module can be taken from the overall options available at the Institute of Archaeology or more widely within UCL and the University of London.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, with guidance from an assigned supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching at the Institute of Archaeology is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars to support student interaction, and examination is primarily through module-based essays and the individual dissertation. Depending on the options taken, teaching may also include object handling, museum work, and laboratory practicals.

Careers

The first cohort of students on the Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East MA is due to graduate in 2018, therefore no specific career destinations are currently available.

Previous UCL graduates in these areas have regularly gone on to undertake doctoral research, or found employment in related areas of the public, museum and heritage sector.

Employability
In addition to receiving advanced training in their chosen subject areas, students will have the opportunity to acquire a strong combination of general research skills, communication skills, skills in teamwork and networking and overall personal effectiveness.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Your instructors on this degree will be world-class scholars whose research is at the cutting-edge of their disciplines. Students will also benefit from the first-class institutions located within walking distance of the Institute of Archaeology, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the British Museum, and the Egypt Exploration Society, and from the institute’s own collections, including the Petrie Palestinian Collection.

Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology at UCL are embedded in the vibrant research environment of the Bloomsbury Campus, in the centre of one of the most exciting cities in the world. Our institute includes over twenty researchers with regional expertise in these areas, including both prehistory and the historical periods.

With its international staff and student body, the Institute of Archaeology (IoA) is well known for its welcoming atmosphere, challenging intellectual climate, and supportive feedback structure. It is regularly rated in first place among UK archaeology departments for student experience.

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This MA is unique in architectural history, theory and criticism postgraduate study, providing a coherent and intensive forum in which students develop independent approaches to the subject. Read more
This MA is unique in architectural history, theory and criticism postgraduate study, providing a coherent and intensive forum in which students develop independent approaches to the subject. Graduates progress to academic, journalistic, curatorial and architectural professions with diverse skills in established and emerging subjects, theories and methodologies.

Degree information

The programme examines architecture and cities from early-modern 16th-century to contemporary 21st-century contexts. Rather than focusing on the work of individuals, stylistic classification or normative categories, the programme locates architecture within social, ideological, creative, political and urban processes, exploring the boundaries of what constitute legitimate architectural objects and sites of study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months is offered.

Core modules:
-Critical Methodologies of Architectural History
-Research and Dissemination of Architectural History

Optional modules - students choose four of the following:
-Architecture in 19th- and 20th-Century Britain
-The Representation of Cities
-Theorising Practices: Architecture, Art and Urbanism
-History and Theory of Digital Design
-Materialist Ecological Architectures
-Multiple Modernities Architecture
-Practices of Criticism

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 10,000-word dissertation and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, building and gallery visits, film screenings, group working and one-to-one tutorials, and a field trip (optional). Assessment is through coursework, consisting of short exercises, classroom presentations, and longer essays for individual modules, a 10,000-word report and oral examination, and verbal presentations.

Careers

Graduates from the UCL Bartlett are very successful in gaining subsequent employment in the UK and internationally. At present there is a growing demand for our Master's graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers. Many graduates from the programme have gone on to research, teach and publish at universities and other institutions worldwide, including national media, publishing and heritage organisations, art galleries and museums.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD in Architectural Visual Arts, University of East London
-Master in Design Studies, Harvard University
-Sub-Editor, Architects Journal
-Architect, Design Group

Employability
Postgraduate study at the UCL Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment is situated within a vibrant graduate and research environment, including a large cohort of PhD students and an extensive range of faculty members with interests in architectural history and theory. Students on the Architectural History MA are immersed in one of the world's largest and most innovative centres for architectural history and theory, and are able to engage in innumerable seminars, research representations and other events. Our graduates are highly sought after. Some choose to continue with academic research or teaching, others go on to roles in the visual arts, education, publishing, heritage, design and architecture.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary built environment faculty, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Located in London, it is at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms and has all the resources of a world city at hand.

This MA is the UK's longest established programme in its field, and prioritises the exploration of new and existing methodologies and critical theories as they might be applied to the study of architecture and cities.

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This new Master's programme pioneers the development of a more diverse and creative approach to the reinterpretation and reuse of historical environments in cities around the world, such as through imaginative architectural designs and urban strategies, and including issues of cultural heritage. Read more
This new Master's programme pioneers the development of a more diverse and creative approach to the reinterpretation and reuse of historical environments in cities around the world, such as through imaginative architectural designs and urban strategies, and including issues of cultural heritage.

Degree information

This programme is exceptional in linking the core research challenge of innovative design with in-depth processes of urban surveying, recording, mapping and analysis. As such, the programme has a strong international component, viewing cities around the world as fascinating laboratories for investigations of architectural and historic urban environments, with London being the prime example.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Design Practice for Historic Environments
-Design Research Methods for Historic Environments
-Issues in Historic Urban Environments
-Surveying and Recording of Cities
-Urban Redevelopment for Historic Environments

Optional modules - students choose one of the following:
-Theorising Practices/Practicing Theory: Art, Architecture and Urbanism
-Representations of Cities
-Multiple Modernities Architecture
-Sustainable Strategies

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words or major design project with a minimum of 5,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops, fieldwork visits, and individual and group tutorials. Assessment is through project critique reviews, project portfolios, coursework essays, individual and group presentations, dissertation/major project and a viva voce examination with an external examiner.

Fieldwork
An annual programme field trip (optional) takes place, normally in February. Departmental stipends of c. £250 are normally available. Maximum cost to the student is £500.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will contribute to the emerging design ideas and technologies that are already starting to change our understanding of contemporary building production in cities around the world, and which involve either reusing existing historic buildings or the insertion of completely new structures into older situations.

Employability
The MA aims to equip graduates with the advanced knowledge and skills required to operate across the areas of urban research, design, management and implementation, combining subject expertise with design creativity, and linking theory, history and practice.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Bartlett School of Architecture is widely regarded as one of the leading architectural schools in the UK and internationally, with a strong reputation for generating knowledge and insights in architectural design, building technology and architectural history and theory.

In October 2013, the renowned Survey of London team moved to join the school, thus providing an opportunity to launch this new programme which also draws upon the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research expertise within the Bartlett, UCL's Faculty of the Built Environment, as well as the cross-faculty UCL Urban Laboratory, and within the university generally.

The programme includes modules that investigate numerous international case studies which gives students the opportunity to carry out design research work in cities outside the UK should they wish to. A field trip each year to a non-UK city will provide staff and students with the knowledge of, and links to, those who are working in the field of architectural and urban heritage internationally.

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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The Art and Design in Education MA draws on the research and teaching expertise with the Art, Design and Museology group at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). Read more
The Art and Design in Education MA draws on the research and teaching expertise with the Art, Design and Museology group at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). It examines the relationship between art practice, theory and pedagogy and enables students to develop a rigorous approach to educational research in art colleges, schools and galleries.

Degree information

This programme will enable you to share and investigate art education from theoretical, historical and practical perspectives. It addresses key issues such as globalisation, alternative models for art education, new technologies and embodied learning. Students will explore the relationship between practical and theoretical modes of enquiry and learn to conduct research using appropriate methodologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Alternative Models for Art Education
-Learning and Teaching in Art and Design

Optional modules:
-Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
-Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience
-Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice

Dissertation/report - all students undertake a dissertation in one of three modes:
-A thesis of 20,000 words.
-Exhibition and 10,000-word report.

Teaching and learning
Teaching methods include studio practice, lectures, seminars, and gallery-based learning delivered by IOE staff, visiting lecturers and professionals working in universities, galleries and schools. Assessment is based on coursework assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

UCL IOE's Art and Design MA students have a strong record of success in obtaining leadership roles in arts organisations and education. Alumni are currently working as lecturers in further and higher education, heads of arts faculties in secondary schools, freelance artists educators in galleries and museums as well as careers advisers for the arts. Graduates have also been very successful entering PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Art and design education at the IOE - the leading institution for education worldwide (QS World University Rankings 2015) - has a long and distinguished history which can be traced back to the work of pioneering art educator Marion Richardson (1892-1946).

Located in the heart of Bloomsbury, the current MA works closely with galleries and museums continuing Richardson's quest to strengthen links between contemporary art practice and education.

Students enjoy the use of purpose built studio space in IOE's Grade I listed building and benefit from being part of a wider community of PGCE, MA and doctoral students.

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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists, practical issues of artefact study, and debates about the collection, interpretation, reporting and curation of archaeological materials. They develop the ability to evaluate different approaches to artefact studies and undertake the cataloguing and analysis of an artefact assemblage.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Working with artefacts and assemblages
-Technology within Society

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy I: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy II: Metallic Artefacts
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Experimental Archaeology
-Funerary Archaeology
-Geoarchaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Interpreting Pottery
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis

Dissertation/report
The 15,000–word dissertation normally combines a professional standard finds report with an academic overview.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment is through an essay, a portfolio, a project proposal and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording finds.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Project Team Officer, English Heritage
-Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Museum Building Manager, Hainan and Haopioen Arts Museum
-Artefacts Assistant, Maidstone Council
-Freelance Numismatist, Self-Employed Numismatist

Employability
The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials based PhD, this course provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis of the course is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

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This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Read more
This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad empirical knowledge of the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the perspective of at least two disciplines, together with an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All option modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose four option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Democratisation in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Key Economic Thinkers of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Latin American Political Economy
-The Making of Modern Latin America: History, Politics and Society
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Society and Development in Latin America
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Latin American Economics: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Environmental Issues, Movements and Policies in the Americas
-International Politics of Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a topic relating to the Caribbean, or Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through varied assignments including essays, an oral presentation and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability
Students will have excellent opportunities to expand professional networks enhancing their future employability. Through Institute staff members' extensive contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the diplomatic service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent graduates have found employment in government (Foreign & Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia. Read more
The Central and South-East European Studies MA is a multidisciplinary programme that enables students to gain specialist knowledge and understanding of the complex culture, history, literature, politics and society of the region from Western Bohemia to Wallachia and from Mazuria to Macedonia.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge of central and south-eastern Europe from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on aspects of history, politics and culture. They develop generic research skills, interdisciplinary and discipline specific research skills, area specific research skills and language skills oriented towards carrying out research in the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a choice of one of three compulsory modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 90 credits can then be selected from a range of options across SSEES.

Core modules - this is a multi-disciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three courses:
-Literary and Cultural Theory
-Historical Methods and Approaches
-Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules - total of 90 credits from options below. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from another SSEES MA programme or from another MA programme within UCL (Anthropology, History, European Studies, Comparative Literature etc.).
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central & Eastern Europe from Stalin to Present
-Little Hitlers? Right Radicalism in Central and Eastern Europe, 1900-1945
-Introduction to Discourse Analysis
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Cities in Eastern Europe
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism and Post-Modernism
-The Crisis Zone: Central Europe 1900-1990
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-'Metropolis': History of Berlin, 1871-1990
-Nation, Identity and Power in Central and Eastern Europe
-Baltic Politics and Society
-Making of the Modern Ukraine
-Security, Identity, Polarity
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Module
-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe
-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
-Directed Reading Module

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions and workshops. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Self-Employed Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Charity Manager, The Big Give
-Parliamentary Assistant, MP's Assistant
-Research Analysis Intern, TechnoServe
-Assistant Producer, Global Radio

Employability
Students who have successfully completed this programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the world's leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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