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City, University of London, Full Time MA Degrees

We have 27 City, University of London, Full Time MA Degrees

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Who is it for?. The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you. are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels. Read more

Who is it for?

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you:

  • are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
  • love languages, other cultures and their differences
  • are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
  • know about translation and want to specialise
  • have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
  • have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
  • are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
  • want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The Masters course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:

  • provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques
  • uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over
  • specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games
  • introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres
  • focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions
  • provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture degree:

  • aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation
  • develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics
  • works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity
  • has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

John Dryden Translation Competition

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work.

The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).



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Who is it for?. This course is suitable for students with a first degree, looking to become well-rounded broadcast journalists. You will have a keen interest in TV and radio news and current affairs plus sport, lifestyle and national and international politics. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a first degree, looking to become well-rounded broadcast journalists. You will have a keen interest in TV and radio news and current affairs plus sport, lifestyle and national and international politics. Though this course is NOT about presenting on screen or on air, you must be prepared to present your material on camera or mic, and write and direct material for others to perform. The MA in Broadcast Journalism is essentially about visual and audio communication of topical information, and requires a desire to communicate through essential team working. City provides an alumni network second to none in the UK broadcast industry; and provides possibly the best employment opportunities of any postgraduate broadcasting course in the UK.

Professor Sir Paul Curran, President says this about Journalism at City:

"Journalism at City began as a postgraduate department in 1976 and has developed some of the most respected MA Journalism courses in the country. Alumni include the BBC¹s Sophie Raworth and BBC Head of News James Harding, Sky News' Dermot Murnaghan, Editor of The Sun Tony Gallagher, Justine Picardie, Editor-in-chief of Harper's Bazaar UK, Channel 4's Ramita Navai and Al Jazeera's Barbara Sheera. Recent graduates are reporters, producers, editors and web content providers, across platforms ranging from the Financial Times and the BBC to Buzzfeed and Vice TV."

Objectives

The MA in Broadcast Journalism produces award winning young journalists and has a superb reputation. You will learn learn comprehensive TV and radio skills. The course benefits from a large cohort of between 50 and 60 students with great networking and peer support. Teaching groups of 15 ensure personal contact with Professor Lis Howell; TV reporter Colette Cooney; Dr Abdullahi Tasiu; and key staff like radio practitioner Sandy Warr.

New from autumn 2016 Broadcast Journalism aims to offer 45 minutes long TV news programmes on news-days produced by students gaining practical training. Newswriting, television and radio journalism are taught in groups of fifteen and larger groups through lectures, workshops and broadcast simulation.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC)

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of the Broadcast Journalism MA. MA Broadcasters arrange their own placements - with help from academics if necessary. You must have 15 days of work experience whilst on the course. This usual happens during the the Christmas break. The size of the City cohorts past and present means unique networking opportunities with present students and 4,000 alumni.

Organisations who have hosted City students in the past include:

  • ABC
  • Al-Jazeera
  • BBC
  • BBC local radio stations across the UK
  • Blakeway Productions
  • Blink
  • CTVC
  • Flame
  • Hardcash Productions
  • ITN
  • ITN Sport (Olympics)
  • NorthOne
  • October Films
  • OR Media
  • Plum Films
  • politics.com
  • Reuters
  • Sky
  • Talkback.

Academic facilities

In 2014 we completed a £12m development project for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN and were praised by the BJTC. They include:

  • A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media simulated broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced
  • Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station
  • Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme
  • Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites
  • Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

Some courses are taught in lecture theatres, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Activities include lectures, practical work in groups and individually, personal tutorials, and independent learning

This pathway is taught by professors, senior lecturers and lecturers, with industry practitioners as visiting lecturers, and a number of key industry visiting speakers.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Assessments vary from module to module but include coursework, practical work both in groups and individually, a Final Project, a written timed test, and essays.

Modules

All of our Broadcast Journalism MA students must undertake core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards and a Final Project. As a Broadcast Journalism student you will take a module in Newsgathering for TV and Radio; a module in Newsdays and longer form film-making; and a module in Data Journalism. Teaching hours are between Monday to Friday during working hours, and occasionally outside those times.

Career prospects

According to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (DLHE), 96.8% of previous graduates from this course were in employment six months after completing the course earn an average salary of £23,000.

Previous graduates go on to work as journalists, producers, or Head of Media & Communications.

Alumni include famous names such as:

  • Sophie Raworth (BBC)
  • Dermot Murnaghan (Sky News)
  • Barbara Serra (Al Jazeera)
  • Jo Whiley (BBC Radio).

Recent graduates of the MA Broadcasting include:

  • Ramita Navai, Emmy Award-winning documentary maker
  • Chris Mason (BBC Political Reporter)
  • Isobel Webster (Sky News)
  • Darren McGaffrey (Sky News)
  • Minnie Stephenson (ITN)
  • Cordelia Lynch (Sky News Washington).


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Who is it for?. The programme provides ideal training for those wishing to enter the professional world of composition and/or proceed to a research degree. Read more

Who is it for?

The programme provides ideal training for those wishing to enter the professional world of composition and/or proceed to a research degree.

We welcome students from all over the world and from a range of backgrounds.

Objectives

The MA Composition develops skills in the broad field of contemporary composition, encompassing notated and digital music, sound art, improvisation and interdisciplinary practices.

The course provides a critical context for exploring key topics and issues in contemporary composition as well as a platform for presenting your own work to an audience of peers.

Engagement with professional creative practice is at the core of the MA Composition. Students have the opportunity to receive tuition from world-renowned composers external to the department. There are also opportunities to work with City’s professional ensembles-in-residence, Plus Minus and EXAUDI.

We have an outstanding reputation for dynamic, inspring and rigorous postgraduate eduation and offer exceptional support to our students

Our students come from all over the world and benefit from our location in the heart of London, one of the world’s greatest cultural hubs.

Academic facilities

Department facilities include advanced recording and composition studios, a professional performance space, computer laboratories, rehearsal rooms, practice rooms and world music instruments.

Our composition studios include three surround (8.1/ 5.1) studios, one of which is dedicated to film and live electronics work, and three stereo composition studios. All of the studios are equipped for sound editing, processing and mixing. As well as general software such as Logic, Sibelius and Pro Tools, these studios are equipped with Native Instruments Komplete.

The recording studio is equipped to deliver multitrack recording and mixing to a professional standard.

Teaching and learning

Teaching delivery is through a combination of lectures, group seminars, interactive sessions, practical workshops, one-to-one tutorials and a high level of individual learning. Students also have the opportunity to receive tuition from world-renowned composers external to the department.

The Department of Music provides a stimulating environment with abundant opportunities for composers and sound artists and there are also plenty of opportunities for involvement in our many ensembles. The department’s concert series features contemporary classical music, world music, electronic music and multimedia work and an annual music festival in May and June provides opportunities for students to receive public performances of their work.

In addition to our many ensembles at City, MA students are also eligible to audition for the University of London Symphony Orchestra.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods, including projects, portfolio submissions and extended creative tasks and accompanying commentary.

Modules

On City's MA Composition, you will take three core modules (30 credits each) in which you will enhance your understanding of creative practice and engage critically with compositional techniques, theoretical concepts and current issues in contemporary composition. You will also submit a major 90-credit Composition Portfolio, which allows you to develop and display your creative compositional practice in a variety of ways.

Core modules

Term one

  • Compositional Materials and Technique (30 credits)
  • Contexts of Composition (30 credits)

Term two

  • Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Process (30 credits)

You will also take a 90-credit Composition Portfolio, which runs through terms two and three.

Career prospects

Our MA programmes have excellent employment statistics. Students have gone on to teach, compose and perform in a wide variety of settings, and are also employed in areas such as music publishing, broadcasting, music management, arts administration and further musical study at MPhil or PhD level.

100% of our graduates are in employment 6 months after graduation, and graduates are mostly working as Freelance composers.

Our alumni include award-winning composers such as film sound designer Chris Reading and Nico Casal, composer for the winner of the Best Short Film at the 2016 Oscars.



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Who is it for?. This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. Read more

Who is it for?

This master’s programme is designed for those with an ambition to write within the range of non-fiction genres. Running over two years, it attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds and ages, all of whom work closely within workshop and tutorial settings to produce a publishable work. The unifying factor for all writers on the programme is their intention to deliver their research or story through a narrative structure.

Objectives

Our definition of narrative non-fiction includes biography, travel, history, life writing, true crime, sports and other forms of sustained and structured non-fiction storytelling. The Creative Writing (Non-Fiction) MA provides you with essential skills and a supportive and challenging environment in which to write a full-length work of narrative non-fiction. You will develop your research skills, experiment with different writing styles, reflect on your own and other writer’s work and learn the essentials of the publishing industry.

Teaching and learning

The teaching, all by published authors, across the two years is front-end loaded in terms 1 and 2 with workshops, lectures and seminars held two evenings a week. Here you will extend your writing skills, your understanding of non-fiction genres and your awareness of creative possibilities. You will also analyse the work of leading writers and explore writing through a variety of exercises, encouraging you to experiment with new approaches.

All workshops are based around the students’ own writing assignments which work towards the completion, or opening chapters, of a book. We also closely analyse published works of non-fiction, taking apart books to examine their style, structure and research methods.

Throughout the two years there are readings and workshops with visiting authors. In terms 3, 4, 5 and 6 you work principally on your own book project with the support of one-to-one tutorials.

In term 6 (the final term) the lectures and guest sessions focus on the publishing industry which will provide you with the knowledge to be placed with a literary agent. During the final term you will have the opportunity to read from your work in progress, to contribute to an anthology of writing and to submit a full draft of your book.

Modules

Term 1

  • CWM 959 The Fundamentals of Non-fiction (core)
  • CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
  • CWM935 Storytelling (core)
  • CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Term 2

  • CWM957 The Process of Writing (core)
  • CWM 958 Literary Criticism (core)
  • CWM935 Storytelling (core)
  • CWM956 Complete Book (core)

Terms 3,4,5 and 6

  • CWM956 Complete Book

Career prospects

The MA creative writing non-fiction is proud of its track record in publishing with students from the programme winning publishing contracts every year.

Graduates include:

  • Peter Moore, The Weather Experiment (Chatto and Windus),
  • Anne Putnam, Navel Gazing (Faber and Faber)
  • Bridge O’Donnell, Inspector Minahan Makes a Stand (Picador).

Graduates have also gone on to work for media outlets and used their transferrable skills in a variety of professions including teaching, political campaigning and in the charity sector.



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Who is it for?. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel. Read more

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel. This is the only Creative Writing MA in the UK or USA which helps you write a whole novel. And it works: one in six of our students currently goes on to sell their novel and The Guardian named this programme as one of the top three in the country.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still 100% committed above all to writing great fiction. This is a one-hundred week course which turns you into a novelist. Find out more about our students who are now published.

Objectives

At the end of this Novels MA, you will be very different; you will have written a novel - polished and ready to send to publishers and agents.

This unique MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. This is a focused, high-intensity course, so we never take more than 14 students each year (14 for Literary and 14 for Crime Thriller), therefore you must apply for a place for Literary Novels or for Crime Thriller Novels at the outset.

At the core of City's unique Novels programme is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Find out more about the prize-winning writers who are currently teaching on this course. Their experience underpins all the teaching. They understand the industry and they know what it takes to get published.

We also host regular Q and A sessions with major, established authors. Find out who has visited our students recently. We value range of opinions and approaches on this course. We don't believe in rules, we believe in what works.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are always happy to work around your other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel.

The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing from each student. Tutoring is adapted and flexible to the needs of the novel you are writing.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with the toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and steering your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the overall plotting and structure of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. There is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are termly Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors each term.

Modules

To get the most out of this course you will write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 proper, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises requires you to submit 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you will be writing your novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and push themselves to write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules which will help you analyse and plan.

Term 1

  • The Fundamentals of Fiction: for this you will submit up to a 1000 words for workshopping and review each week. This module looks at the building blocks of creative prose.
  • Storytelling (Part 1): a lecture series designed to flex your plotting muscles and so help you invent the story for your novel.
  • Reading as a Writer: we take apart recent novels to see how they tick and examine everything it takes to construct a novel.

Term 2

  • Experiments in Style: for this you will submit longer pieces for weekly workshopping and review. This module looks at wider, thematic techniques.
  • Storytelling (Part 2): the second half of the lecture series to prepare you for the outline of the novel which you will write by April.

Terms 3 to 6

  • Complete Novel: this is the spine of the course, the major novel-writing module. It is taught almost entirely through one-to-one tutorials (daytime or early evening). Each tutorial requires the presentation of 10,000 words which is both line-edited in advance by the tutor and then discussed at length (for as long as it takes). For the last of these tutorials (during the second Summer Term), you are required to present a complete First Draft of your novel.


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Who is it for?. Our Creative Writing programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. Read more

Who is it for?

Our Creative Writing programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. It is also suitable for writers who while continuing with their own practice, will work in development roles in the film, TV, theatre and related industries such as literary agencies.

Our programme has been designed, with input from a range of playwrights and screenwriters, to provide the optimum environment for students to complete a full length play or feature film script to a high standard.

As the programme is taught in the evening, we welcome applications from mature students with work and family commitments who are committed to writing a full length play or screenplay over two years.

Find out more about our alumni and what they achieved during their time at City, University of London.

Objectives

Creatively stimulating, challenging and above all practical, this innovative two-year Creative Writing programme taught during the evening, provides a supportive and thought-provoking environment for playwrights and screenwriters to explore their ideas, develop their craft and finish a full-length work to a high standard.

You will develop as a writer and sharpen your understanding of what's working and what isn't. No single style or genre is prescribed; the ethos of the programme is excellence and diversity.

You will get to understand writing choices in the work of leading playwrights and screenwriters. You will work with actors and directors from London's new writing theatres, and receive guest talks from agents, producers and artistic directors.

By the end of the course, you will have taken a full-length play, screenplay or television pilot through a number of drafts, working as professional writers do. This play or screenplay will be your calling card. You will receive a performed reading of an extract of your work and a professional script report.

Accreditation

The Creative Writing (Playwriting and Screenwriting) MA is accredited by Skillset, the Creative Industries’ Sector Skills Council which means that students are eligible for the BAFTA Scholarship programme – successful applicants receive a bursary of up to £10,000, a BAFTA mentor, access to BAFTA events, plus a paid work placement at Warner Bros UK.

Industry ties

The course has strong ties with leading playwrights and screenwriters. Recent visiting speakers include:

Richard Bean, Alan Bennett, Ronan Bennett, J Blakeson, Adam Brace, Laurence Coriat, Rib Davies, David Edgar, Martha Fiennes, Andrea Gibb, Tony Grisoni, Stuart Hazeldine, Dennis Kelly, Mike Leigh, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Patrick Marber, Paul Mayeda Berges, Nicholas McInerny, Anthony Neilson, Diane Samuels, Paul Sirett, Ali Taylor, Sue Teddern, Colin Teevan, Timberlake Wertenbaker, and Roy Williams.

You will have the opportunity to meet agents, producers, directors, and authors on screenwriting. Recent guests have included:

Linda Aronson, Katie Battcock, Matthew Bates, Paul Basset Davies, Camilla Bray, Ruth Caleb, Julian Friedmann, Tony Garnett, Lisa Goldman, Fin Kennedy, Kate Leys, Nick Marston, Margaret Matheson, Jeremy Mortimer, George Perrin, Simon Shaps, David Thompson, Neil Quinn, Mervyn Watson and Katie Williams.

Teaching and learning

Our Creative Writing masters course is taught and run by professional working writers and you will be mentored by a professional working playwright or screenwriter for the whole of year two.

You will be taught intensively for six hours per week in year one and in the second year you choose to write either a full length play, or screenplay, or a pilot for an original television series.

This playwriting and screenwriting course is based around a mix of practical workshops, seminars and lectures. All this is supported by one-to-one tutorials and by independent study: notably reading and preparing presentations on set texts and performing set writing exercises. As the course progresses, the emphasis shifts to independent study and is supported by workshops and one-to-one tutorials.

Central to this Creative Writing masters course is the requirement to finish a full-length play or screenplay. The course culminates in a showcase of your work to an audience of industry professionals and other interested parties.

Assessment

Assessment includes participation in lectures, seminars and workshops; of work on presentations; set exercises and own play or screen script proposal.

Career prospects

Many of our Creative Writing graduates from play and screenwriting go on to have their work performed professionally and have won many awards and nominations. Since the beginning of 2015 over 40 students and alumni have had plays performed.

Some recent examples include

  • Graduate Aisha Zia received a grant from Brookleaze and her new play Besieged was performed at the Arcola Theatre
  • Dianna Hunt, Her play ‘One Woman's Slide: A Blues’ has been programmed in the Talawa Arts Festival.
  • Cheryl White, whose films include Before Babel (2013) which won Best Short at the Kent and Rye Film Festival International film festival 2015; Winner of Best Film and Most Innovative Film at WOW Festival 2014.
  • Louisa Hayford, who did a ten week paid internship at the Coronation Street story department as part of the ITV Coronation Street Original Voices scheme.

Our graduates have had plays performed in London at the Old Vic, Arcola, Old Red Lion, Southwark Playhouse, Globe and White Bear theatres; as well as in Australia, New York, the Netherlands and Afghanistan.



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Who is it for?. This course will appeal to both experienced and new writers who wish to gain the knowledge and skills relevant to professional practice in commercial settings which produce creative content for print and across digital formats. Read more

Who is it for?

This course will appeal to both experienced and new writers who wish to gain the knowledge and skills relevant to professional practice in commercial settings which produce creative content for print and across digital formats. You will be introduced to the fast-changing world of commercial publishing, and will be given an understanding of and exposure to the many different sectors of the publishing industry. A digital publishing element will teach you how social media and web publishing is now vital to finding and sustaining your own community of readers.

The target market for the programme is graduates from across the humanities and social sciences who wish to combine a focus on the development of creative writing skills with a strong theoretical and practical understanding of how the publishing industry works. It is ideal for anyone interested in getting hands-on publishing experience alongside developing their creative practice.

Objectives

If you have experience of writing or working in publishing (or a related field), and would like to develop your skills further, this course is designed for you. If you are interested in learning how you, as a writer, can engage with the publishing industry and even work within it, this course will develop the skills you need. Creative Writing and Publishing MA enables you to aspire to a professional role that will match your interests and draw upon all of your talents. We welcome writers of all genres with recent graduates developing projects in literary fiction, fantasy, romance, science fiction and young adult fiction.

eaching and learning

You will learn through a mix of formal lectures, writing workshops, individual tutorials, group project work, seminar contributions, study visits, work attachments, project work and independent learning and research. Visiting speakers, including guest authors, regularly support your learning and module projects. You are encouraged, through a variety of strategies, to reflect on professional practice and professional frameworks during all of your applied work.

You will acquire attitudes and values through your interactions with lecturers, many of whom are professional writers or practicing publishers, and through a critical, reflective approach to your writing practice and to working in publishing. Leading writers act as guest tutors and mentors while senior members of the publishing industry regularly visit and often sponsor projects. Publishing and writing masterclasses also enable you to debate current issues within your field. Moodle is also embedded as a learning tool within the programme, offering you opportunities to interact with your fellow students and other programme academic staff outside of the classroom or workshop.

Your intellectual and cognitive skills will be developed through the programme’s range of learning modes, which include lectures, seminars, tutorials, coursework, the option of an assessed work placement drafts of major writing projects and short assignments and in your final project.

Your subject specific and transferable skills are developed in the modules through lectures, seminars, tutorials, coursework, an optional assessed work placement and in your major project.

Assessment

For the Creative Writing Workshop module and the Storytelling module, you will be assessed through an individual assessment, which may include a portfolio of creative writing, a substantial piece of redrafted creative writing with an accompanying self-reflective essay or a critical academic essay or a researched book proposal.

In your other modules, you will be assessed by a range of methods including analytical essays; assessed group and individual projects; presentations with supporting research; and reflective reports on your own portfolios of writing or professional experience.

Modules

The MA CWP runs over one academic year for full-time students who undertake two core creative writing modules over terms 1 and 2, alongside core publishing modules in term 1 and electives in term 2. In the final term students must complete their Major Project. Part-time students undertake the core creative writing modules in their first year of study, undertaking the publishing modules and electives and major project in the second year.

Term 1

In the first term, full-time students undertake two core 30-credit modules in creative writing that run over both terms and comprise:

  • a creative writing workshop
  • lecture series on storytelling.

In term 1, full-time students will also undertake two core 15-credit modules from the publishing suite:

  • Creating and Managing Intellectual Property
  • Digitisation and Publishing.

Term 2

In the second term, full-time students chose two 15-credit electives, with options including:

  • International Publishing Case Studies
  • Professional Placement
  • Design for Interactive Media
  • Developing Creative Content
  • Digital Cultures
  • Libraries and Publishing in an Information Society.

Term 3

Throughout the three terms, you will be invited to attend masterclasses in creative writing, professional development sessions, and group and one-to-one tutorials, as you work towards your Major Project.

Part-time route

Part-time students take the creative writing core modules in their first year of study and in their second year undertake the publishing core modules and electives and the Major Project.

Career prospects

We are delighted that graduate Carlie Sorosiak’s (MA CWP 2015) young adult novel, If Birds Fly Back will be published by HarperTeen in the US, Macmillan in the UK, Penguin Random House in Spain, and Arena Verlag in Germany in 2017.

Holly Domney (MA CWP 2016) and Maja Olsen (MA CWP 2017) both won the George Orwell Dystopian Fiction Prize and is currently working in the publishing industry.

At City, you will benefit from our reputation for placing graduate students with agents and with major publishers. Creative writers get exposure to agents, editors and others within both traditional and electronic publishing. For budding publishers, you have the option of a work placement within the industry. We have for many years supported the career prospects of our publishing graduates via supportive links with an industry advisory board as well as alumni.



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Who is it for?. Students come from all over the world and from all kinds of backgrounds - from fashion to film and all other sectors of the creative industries. Read more

Who is it for?

Students come from all over the world and from all kinds of backgrounds - from fashion to film and all other sectors of the creative industries. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree and a passion for the arts, or those with previous experience working within the cultural sector and eclectic areas of interest they want to pursue. From digital crowdfunding to policies for the creative city, and from social media and the democratisation of opera to the motivations of young fashion enrepreneurs or museum branding, students are able to investigate their own subject and develop their individual professional path on the programme.

Objectives

This programme is all about customising your learning so you can become a competent professional ready to start, continue or change your career. On completion of the course you will be able to evaluate and integrate the theories and practices of culture, policy and management.

The student experience runs through everything we do, from the structure of the course itself to our discussions and tutorials. The curriculum was developed with support from an advisory group that includes senior figures from Arts Council England, the Barbican, Shakespeare's Globe and the V&A. This means your learning is attuned to the latest insights from the sector.

Placements

The professional work placement is an elective module giving you the opportunity to work in the cultural sector to apply the skills you have gained from the programme so far.

When it comes to the organisation, it is totally up to you. Previous students have gained experience with the Southbank Centre, Tate Modern, The British Library, IMG Artists, LIFT, Business of Culture (consultancy), Motiroti, British Museum, Unicorn Theatre, Jerwood Space, London Fashion Week, Arts Council England and the British Film Institute.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning is delivered through lectures, seminars, group work, tutorials, visits, workshops, verbal and written feedback, plus personal research from a wide range of resources.

You are able to apply your essay questions and academic work to the real world – and one that you know well. For example, in the marketing module, you can choose an organisation from your own country, conduct research and then write a marketing strategy, which could be practically implemented.

Modules

With 50% core and 50% elective modules, you can choose which specialisms you study from the first term onwards. This means you can design your own course and determine your direction right from the start. This flexibility offers our MA students the freedom to shape their future.

The MA is structured around a spine of four core modules taking place in the autumn and spring terms – culture, cultural policy, managing organisations and Introduction to research. The MA culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation (running through the spring and summer terms), which students complete by the end of August.

Core modules

  • Culture (15 credits)
  • Managing organisations (15 credits)
  • Cultural policy (15 credits)
  • Introduction to research (15 credits)

Elective modules

  • Audiences and marketing (15 credits)
  • Digital cultures (15 credits)
  • Fundraising in and for the cultural sector (15 credits)
  • Ethics and Social Responsibility in the Cultural Industries’ (15 credits)
  • Professional placement (15 credits)
  • Public culture: diversity, equality and activism in the cultural sector’ (15 credits)
  • Understanding financial accounts and entrepreneurship (15 credits)
  • Celebrity (Sociology) (15 credits)
  • Communication, culture and development (Sociology) (30 credits)
  • Popular music and society (Music) (15 credits)
  • International Organisations in Global Politics (International Politics) (15 credits)
  • Designing Interactive Media (15 credits)
  • Globalisation and Identity: Culture, Race and Difference (15 credits)
  • Creative Cities (15 credits)
  • Mediating Gender and Sexuality(15 credits)

Career prospects

MA Culture, Policy and Management graduates find employment across all sub-sectors and occupational areas of the creative and cultural sector (in the UK and across the world).

According to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, previous graduates in employment six months after completing the course earn an average salary of £24,000.

In 2016, one of our graduates went on to work as Producer and Director @ City of London Festival.

From orchestras to the art market, and from marketing to management, 80% of our graduates are now employed in cultural roles. Here are just a few examples of our student destinations:

  • Barbican Centre (London)
  • UNESCO (Paris)
  • Ullens Contemporary Art Centre (Beijing)
  • Royal Opera House (London)
  • Dongdaemun Design Plaza (South Korea)
  • National Art Gallery ‘Astana’ (Kazakhstan)
  • Culture Ministry (Turkey)
  • Qatar Museums Authority (Qatar)
  • Christian Dior (Paris)
  • Arts Streaming TV (London)
  • Arts Council of Singapore.


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Who is it for?. The MA in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy is designed for those planning, or already engaged in, a career in the diplomatic service, journalism, international organisations (such as the . Read more

Who is it for?

The MA in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy is designed for those planning, or already engaged in, a career in the diplomatic service, journalism, international organisations (such as the United Nations or the European Union) or non-governmental organisations (such as Amnesty International and Oxfam). It will also prepare you for a career in political risk, international finance and think tanks.

Objectives

In this Diplomacy and Foreign Policy MA, you will develop your analytical capacities and your ability to examine and critically evaluate the role of foreign policy, diplomacy and decision-making in relation to complex issues such as:

  • the capacity of states to meet their economic and political foreign policy goals
  • the role of foreign policy and diplomacy in global conflict
  • the relationship between human rights, foreign policy, and diplomacy
  • the evolution of international organisations as diplomatic and foreign policy forums.

You will explore the significance of risk and change in contemporary foreign policy and diplomacy, and develop your ability to critically evaluate foreign policy tools and diplomacy in the contemporary world.

Placements

You may have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage students to create their own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics related degrees and includes:

  • Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators
  • Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Teaching and learning

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.

You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

In taught Diplomacy and Foreign Policy modules you will be assessed on written coursework (100% of the module mark), with the exception of Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-making where - due to the module’s more practical nature - the assessment will also include performance in class exercises.

In addition, as a student in the Diplomacy and Foreign Policy degree programme, you will have to complete a dissertation (60 credits or one-third of your overall mark). There are no exams at the MA level. Coursework for Diplomacy and Foreign Policy modules typically is a 4000-word essay for 30 credit modules and 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules.

Elective modules open to Diplomacy and Foreign Policy students offered by other Departments/Schools may have different sets of assessment requirements.

Modules

The structure of this MA includes both compulsory and optional modules to combine optimal training in the fields of diplomacy and foreign policy and significant student choice. There are three core modules:

  • Strategy, Diplomacy, and Decision Making
  • Economic Diplomacy
  • Foreign Policy Analysis

You may then choose from a wide range of modules offered by the Department of Sociologyand The City Law School.

Students complete a total of 180 credits: 60 core, 60 elective, 60 dissertation.

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. 

Current graduates now work within the following organisations:

From government agencies to NGOs and human rights organisations, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.



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Who is it for?. This course is suitable for students with a good first degree and some journalistic experience, and a strong desire to pursue a subsequent career in Journalism or a related field. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a good first degree and some journalistic experience, and a strong desire to pursue a subsequent career in Journalism or a related field. The specialism at City, University of London is mainly, but not exclusively, focused on Business and Finance Journalism.

Objectives

This Masters course is part of the prestigious Erasmus Mundus programme.

Students study as part of a diverse cohort of individuals from around the world.

The Erasmus Mundus MA in Journalism, Media and Globalisation is truly an international course.

The first year is spent in the University of Aarhus, Denmark, the second at City, University of London (where students specialise in financial and business journalism) or at the University of Swansea (Wales), Hamburg University (Germany) or University of Amsterdam (Netherlands).

The Mundus Journalism degree explores the practice and performance of journalism and the media in the context of a new environment brought about by globalisation, modernisation, commercialisation and professional developments.

The course also offers some exchange opportunities for students to travel to one of the following three institutions in the spring of the first year: University of California, Berkeley, USA; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile; or University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. There is a broad range of national and international guest lecturers from media and research institutions features.

Academic facilities

During your second year studies at City, University of London, you will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios, and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:

  • a television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced
  • 4 radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station
  • 2 radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme
  • 2 digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites
  • 2 TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production

Teaching and learning

The Erasmus Mundus Global Journalism MA brings together five leading European institutions in journalism and media education.

Study Abroad

Between the first and second years of the programme some students have the opportunity to participate in summer exchanges at our international partners:

  • University of California at Berkeley, USA
  • University of Technology Sydney, Australia
  • Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile

Modules

Danish School of Journalism / Aarhus University

Semester 1 core modules:

  • Globalisation: Reporting global change (20 credits)
  • Globalisation and the transformation of the state (20 credits)
  • Globalisation, culture and the roles of the media (20 credits)

Semester 2 core modules:

  • Social science methods for journalists (20 credits)
  • Researching journalism (20 credits)
  • Analytical journalism (20 credits).

City, University of London

Semester 3 core modules:

  • Global capitalism: past, present, future (20 credits)
  • World of Financial Journalism (20 credits)
  • World of Business (20 credits)

Semester 4:

  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Career prospects

Students from the programme have gone on to work for Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones, the BBC, the Financial Times, Reuters, China Daily, Danish Broadcasting Corporation, Helsingin Sanomat, TV 2 Norway, Xinhua News Agency, Bangkok Post, Associated Press and Platts. Other students are working for international organisations, including the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Companies and the European Commission, and for international corporations including Morgan Stanley.

Alumni of the course are now working in organisations including:

  • Financial Times
  • SunTec
  • Greenpeace
  • Savivo A/S
  • Bloomberg
  • Handelsblatt
  • Slovenian Press Agency
  • WirtschaftsWoche.


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Who is it for?. Students interested in extending their knowledge and developing critical and research skills in ethnomusicology. The course provides a rigorous training relevant to a range of professional careers, including further study at doctoral level. Read more

Who is it for?

Students interested in extending their knowledge and developing critical and research skills in ethnomusicology.

The course provides a rigorous training relevant to a range of professional careers, including further study at doctoral level.

We welcome students from all over the world and from a range of backgrounds.

Objectives

Combining academic rigour with a flexible course structure, the MA Ethnomusicology introduces students to new ways of thinking about music in its cultural contexts, with a particular focus on ethnographic work in urban settings.

Students consider current issues and debates in ethnomusicology and explore the complex interrelationships between music and other subjects, and between theory and creative practice. The course provides a rich creative environment in which to develop critical approaches to musical practices. The MA offers a range of options, with students able to focus project work on areas of individual interest. The course also provides training in fundamental research skills.

We have an outstanding reputation for dynamic, inspring and rigorous postgraduate eduation and offer exceptional support to our students.

Our students come from all over the world and benefit from our location in the heart of London, one of the world’s greatest cultural hubs.

Placements

The professional work placement is an elective module giving you the opportunity to work in the cultural sector to apply the skills you have gained from the programme so far.

When it comes to the organisation, it is totally up to you. Previous students have gained experience with the Southbank Centre, The British Library, IMG Artists, LIFT, Arts Council England and the British Film Institute.

Academic facilities

Music students can take advantage of our advanced recording and composition studios, a professional performance space, computer laboratories, rehearsal rooms, practice rooms and world music instruments. The recording studio is equipped to deliver multi-track recording and mixing to a professional standard.

We also welcome students with interests in ethnographic film-making, which we support with a range of audio-visual facilities and editing software such as Final Cut Pro.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through lectures, small group seminars and one-to-one tutorials in which students receive supervision from world-leading researchers.

In addition, we arrange off-site visits, such as to the British Library or to relevant conferences. Project work also involves engaging with external organisations, including local communities.

We use a range of assessment types, including extended projects, portfolio submissions and written examinations. Assessment will depend on the particular modules chosen by students.

We have a vibrant postgraduate community and there are plenty of opportunities for involvement in our many ensembles, including Javanese and Balinese gamelans, Middle Eastern ensemble and Latin ensemble.

We host a regular concert series and an annual summer music festival. In addition, there are regular workshops, visiting speakers and research seminars, and we also host occasional conferences.

In addition to our many ensembles at City, MA students are also eligible to audition for the University of London Symphony Orchestra.

Modules

MA Ethnomusicology students take two core modules (total 60 credits), two or three elective modules (total 30 or 60 credits), and also produce a final Ethnomusicology Major Project (60 or 90 credits).

A typical 30 credit taught module involves two hours of lectures/seminars per week over a ten-week teaching term, plus a total of one-hour tutorial supervision over the course of the module (usually two thirty minute meetings).

In addition, the MA involves a significant amount of self-directed study, including preparation between classes, and researching and writing projects, equivalent to about 18 hours per week over a fifteen-week period (from the start of teaching to the final assessment).

Students take two core modules in the first term,  followed by elective modules in the second term (for part-time students the modules are spread over two years)

Core modules

  • Critical Readings in Musicology (30 credits)
  • Researching Music in Contemporary Culture (30 credits)

Elective modules

  • Music Special Project (30 credits)
  • Interdisciplinarity and Collaborative Process (30 credits)
  • Urban Ethnomusicology (30 credits)
  • Historical Musicology (30 credits)

Plus a range of elective modules in the Departments of Sociology and International Politics:

  • Professional Placement (15 credits)
  • Audiences and Marketing (15 credits)
  • Digital cultures (15 credits)
  • Culture (15 credits)
  • Cultural Policy (15 credits)
  • Public Culture: The Politics of Participation (15 credits)
  • Global Cultural Industries, Ethics and Social Responsibility (15 credits)
  • Celebrity (15 credits)
  • Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics (30 credits)
  • Development in Communications Policy (30 credits)
  • Political Communication (30 credits)
  • Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics (30 credits)
  • International Organisations in Global Politics (15 credits)
  • Theories of International Politics (30 credits)
  • Political Islam in Global Politics (15 credits)
  • The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
  • Global Governance (15 credits)
  • International Politics of the Middle East
  • (15 credits)
  • Development and World Politics
  • (15 credits)

(NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints).

Dissertation

The MA culminates in a 60 or 90 credit Ethnomusicology Major Project, an extended independent project on an ethnomusicological topic running through the spring and summer terms, which students complete by the end of August. All projects will include an ethnographic component and can take the form of a 12-15,000 (60 credit) or 15-20,000 (90 credit) word dissertation, an ethnographic film and accompanying written commentary, or a lecture-recital and accompanying written commentary.

Examples of previous dissertation projects include:

  • 'Production of Identity via Culture in a French New Town. The Case of Cergy-Pontoise’
  • ‘Tracing the Contours of Self-Expression and Identity through Social Media in Omani Traditional Music'
  • ‘Eritrean Diasporic Music in London’
  • ‘Key Changes: A Conscious Approach to “Alternative” Music Therapy’
  • ‘Hybridity, Afro-Modernism and Double Consciousness in the Music of Kanye West’
  • ‘Computer Music and Post-Digital Aesthetics’
  • ‘Tropes of Contemporary Globalisation and the Paradoxes of Berlin’s Electronic Dance Culture’

Career prospects

Our MA programmes have excellent employment statistics. Students  have gone on to teach, compose and perform in a wide variety of settings and are also employed in areas such as music publishing, broadcasting, music management, arts administration and further musical study at MPhil or PhD level.



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Who is it for?. If you are attracted to an exciting international career reporting on global finance, are passionate about consumer affairs, or interested in investigating money stories this is the programme for you. Read more

Who is it for?

If you are attracted to an exciting international career reporting on global finance, are passionate about consumer affairs, or interested in investigating money stories this is the programme for you. Most students don’t have any background in finance but are interested in working as financial journalists. The programme also attracts working journalists who want to specialise in financial journalism, and graduates with a background in the financial sector who want to work as journalists. We welcome applications from UK/EU graduates and non-EU graduates with good English skills.

Objectives

The MA in Financial Journalism is unique in its international reach and includes the chance for overseas travel. The course teaches the skills needed for financial journalism. Supported by the Marjorie Deane Foundation the course aims to develop the professional skills and knowledge needed to work in a multimedia environment…

Through the generous support of the Marjorie Deane Foundation for Financial Journalism, the MA Financial Journalism degree offers two unique features:

  • A study abroad programme that subsidises student travel to study financial journalism in New York and Shanghai. Find out more about the Majorie Deane Summer School.
  • Full tuition scholarship opportunities through the generosity of the Marjorie Deane Financial Journalism Foundation for both UK/EU students and overseas students from developing countries.

Placements

Many media organisations approach the MAFJ course with requests for interns.  All students are encouraged to seek work experience while they study on this course. Internships can be undertaken full-time during the six-week winter break and the summer, as well as part-time during the spring. This programme does not grant academic credit for any work experience undertaken. Some internships, particularly those by large media organisations over the summer, are paid. Examples of the kind work experience students on this programme have successfully arranged:

  • Bloomberg
  • Reuters
  • BBC
  • Financial Times
  • Wall Street Journal
  • CNBC
  • Sky News
  • CityWire
  • Which Money

Additionally, several media organisations have offered dedicated paid internships exclusively to students on MA Financial Journalism course, including Argus Media and AFP, subject a separate application process. These have often led to full-time job offers.

Visits to Media Organisations

Throughout the course there are opportunities for you to visit and gain inside understanding of the application process at a number of leading media organisations including: Reuters, Bloomberg, CNBC and the Wall Street Journal.

Academic facilities

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:

  • a television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media simulated broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced
  • 4 radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station
  • 2 radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme
  • 2 digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites
  • 2 TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production

Teaching and learning

The MA Financial Journalism is currently led by Tom Felle, a former international foreign correspondent. Module tutors include The Sunday Times Banking Correspondent Aimee Donnellan, former senor Reuters journalists Roger Jeal and Anne Senior. Recent guest speakers have included Financial Times interactive editor Martin Stabe, Bloomberg News editor-in-chief Matt Winkler, and economist Jim O'Neill. Guest lecturers from the highly rated Cass Business School also provide tuition on specialised topics in business and financial journalism.

The programme includes an online live production day reporting on the UK Budget, producing a web-based special report, and a TV production week during which you will produce a half-hour current affairs business television programme.

This pathway is taught by professors, senior lecturers and lecturers, with industry practitioners as Visiting Lecturers, and a number of key industry visiting speakers. Activities include lectures, practical work in groups and individually, personal tutorials, and independent learning

Assessments vary from module to module but include coursework, practical work both in groups and individually, a Final Project, and essays.

Modules

By the end of the course, you will have had extensive training in the best professional practice of reporting business and financial news, working across television, radio, print and online media.

You will develop professional skills in

  • interviewing
  • researching
  • writing news stories and features
  • you will develop an understanding of how to obtain and use key economic and financial data, using state-of-the art Bloomberg terminals.

You will have a firm grounding in corporate, financial and economic reporting, the ability to understand and manipulate financial data and to critically analyse announcements by companies and government departments.

You will also complete a final project which demonstrates their ability to write a longer piece of written journalism or a broadcast video to a professional standard.

All of our MA Journalism students must undertake underpinning core modules in Ethics, Rules and Standards and a Final Project.

Teaching hours are between Mondays to Fridays during working hours, and occasionally outside those times.

Core modules

  • Journalism Portfolio
  • Editorial Production
  • Journalism Ethics
  • Fundamentals of Financial Journalism
  • Data Journalism.

Electives

  • Reporting Business (markets and corporates)
  • Reporting the Global Economy
  • Journalism Innovation
  • Advanced Data and Coding.

Career prospects

Three quarters of our Alumni are still working in London, with others located in major financial centres like New York, Hong Kong, Mumbai, and Singapore. In 2014, nearly all our students had received job offers within three months of graduating from the programme.



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Who is it for?. The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. Read more

Who is it for?

The Global Political Economy MA will help you broaden your understanding of the complex contemporary global economic system and its socio-political relationships. The course is designed for inquisitive students that want to develop a cutting-edge perspective on global economic and financial relations, inter-state competition, mechanisms of global governance and processes of transformation and change.

You don’t need any formal economics education for this course. Students come from a wide range of subject fields, including Politics, Law, Business Studies, Media Studies, the Humanities and more.

From global inequality and tax evasion to financial regulation and financial crises, the expertise that you develop on this advanced MA will enable you to pursue a wide range of rewarding career options in the public and private sectors.

Objectives

The Global Political Economy MA will help you:

  • Get an advanced specialist education in the field of global political economy.
  • Develop your analytical skills and the ability to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between markets, governments, transnational actors and networks in the setting of the globalising economy.
  • Acquire an advanced conceptualisation of the problems of global capitalism in the
  • 21st century.
  • Critically examine rapid economic change and its socio-political roots in the contemporary world.
  • Analyse and articulate your analysis of complex issues and debates to a high level.
  • Prepare for a diverse range of careers and develop contextual knowledge that will be applicable for life-long learning in a rapidly changing economic environment.

Teaching and learning

You will benefit from our internationally renowned expertise in the field of global political economy, exemplified by:

  • The leading academic staff who deliver the course.
  • The vibrant research culture at the City Political Economy Research Centre.
  • City’s central London location.

The MA in Global Political Economy is taught by internationally renowned, world-leading scholars in the field, including the next-generation of academics engaged in cutting-edge research. As a result, City boasts one of the UK’s best teams in the critical study of global finance.

Our staff includes Ronen Palan, Anastasia Nesvetailova, Stefano Pagliari, Amin Samman and Sandy Brian Hager amongst others.

Student activities

In many modules, you will be encouraged to give presentations. We use group discussions, brain-storming, role-play and mini-roundtables on thematic issues in addition to conventional teaching techniques.

As an MA student, you are also invited to attend PhD workshops organised by doctoral students in the Department.

Assessment

All modules are assessed through a written essay of 4,500 words.

In addition to coursework, you must complete a final MA dissertation of 15,000 words based on your independent research. The dissertation is worth one-third of the overall MA mark. The Global Political Economy MA dissertation is grounded in a specialised stream of the Research Design module (IPM111). During the module, you will receive specialised training in research methodology, tailored for your dissertation in the field of global political economy.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits in total.

The course consists of core modules on the history of global capitalism and contending approaches from across the political economy traditions. You will then develop specialist knowledge through elective modules, which cover issues such as economic and financial crises, international organisations and economic diplomacy, poverty and inequality, regionalisation and globalisation, states and sovereignty, and the rise of new economic powers.

You will take two core modules and a range of electives. Core modules are typically taught as a weekly one-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial, and optional modules as a weekly two-hour seminar session.

Teaching is supported by a personal tutorial and supervision system, as well as organised seminar series with outside speakers, both professional and academic.

Core modules

Elective modules

You choose 60 credits from:

Typical modules offered by the Department of International Politics:

  • Understanding Security in the Twenty-First Century (15 credits)
  • Development and World Politics (15 credits)
  • Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)
  • The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)
  • Global Governance (15 credits)
  • International Politics and the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Global Financial Governance (15 credits)
  • Strategy, Diplomacy and Decision-Making (30 credits)
  • Economic Diplomacy (15 credits)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15 credits)
  • Religion in Global Politics (15 credits

Typical modules offered by The City Law School:

  • International Law and the Global Economy (30 credits)
  • International Tax Law (30 credits)
  • International Trade Law(30 credits)
  • Money Laundering Law (30 credits)
  • International Investment Law (30 credits)
  • International Banking Law (30 credits)

In Term 3 you will complete your dissertation project.

Career prospects

This specialised MA degree will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need to enter a range of careers related to the global political economy. It enables graduates both with and without prior knowledge of economics to engage competently and confidently with economic and financial developments and pursue professional careers in the public and private sectors, including:

  • Finance and banking.
  • Transnational corporations.
  • Civil service and international diplomacy.
  • The media.
  • Development agencies.

Should you want to take your academic studies further, the MA also provides you with a solid foundation to pursue doctoral research in politics and political economy.

International Politics Careers Day

During your MA year you are encouraged to attend the Department's International Politics Careers Day which explores career opportunities and provides:

  • Talks by speakers within the field (including City alumni). Previous speakers have included staff from the Department for International Development, the Ministry of Justice, UNESCO, the EU Commission and the UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO).
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators.
  • CV and application advice, and volunteering drop-in sessions with career professionals.


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Who is it for?. This course is suitable for students from any degree background with an interest in current affairs and digital journalism. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students from any degree background with an interest in current affairs and digital journalism. Some experience of social media and/or data work can be useful for those wishing to specialise in these fields.

Objectives

This Interactive Journalism MA has a particular emphasis on digital media, and prepares you to enter and/or further develop a career in online journalism in particular. It has a strong reputation for preparing students for both specialist jobs, such as data journalism, social media and audience development, as well as broader roles in digital journalism. Teaching from current journalists ensures up-to-date skills and relevant industry contacts.

The curriculum reflects the continuing development of digital journalism through interactive content and formats that engage users as active participants.

Innovative modules focus on social media and audience development, data journalism and coding for journalists. Video and audio work are also geared to online publication.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our digital newsrooms, with access to cameras, audio recorders and other equipment, with dedicated technical support.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development project for our journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and include two digital newsrooms - impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.

  • A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced
  • Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station
  • Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme
  • Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites
  • Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Placements

We actively encourage all our journalism student to gain journalism experience during their studies with us. Professional experience is an important step in developing a career in journalism and it helps students by put their learning into practice and make contacts in the industry.

Work experiences are not formally assessed or arranged as part of the MA Programme but your personal tutor may be able to advise you in suitable organisations to approach that may suit your chosen career path.

Teaching and learning

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Ethics, Rules and Standards and UK Media Law, but some involve small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Shorthand

Our students have the option of taking part in a Teeline shorthand course alongside their studies. This costs £100 (refundable if you reach 100 words per minute) and runs across two terms.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation. Assessment is often through a portfolio of journalistic assignments of this kind.

Modules

This course will prepare you for work in the rapidly changing environment of online journalism, with a focus on the key areas of social media, audience development, data journalism and coding.

You will develop these digital specialisations alongside essential journalistic skills of writing, reporting, newsgathering, interviewing and features - core elements of City's renowned Journalism MA programme. Multimedia work is geared to online publication.

Core modules

  • Journalism Ethics (30 credits) – You put practical journalism in an ethical context with case studies and there are discussion groups in the second term.
  • Journalism Portfolio (30 credits) - You develop the essential skills of reporting, from ideas and research to interviewing and writing, news and features, and using the Freedom of Information Act in journalism.
  • Final Project (30 credits) – You explore a topic of your choice in depth to produce one or more pieces of journalism, in text-based or online multimedia formats, ideally for publication online and/or in print.
  • Social, Community and Multimedia Management (30 credits) – Social media and shareable content strategies for audience development, plus video shooting and editing for online.
  • Data Journalism (15 credits) – The essentials of data journalism
  • Advanced Data and Coding (15 credits) – Taking your data journalism further with advanced tools and techniques, plus an introduction to coding for journalists.
  • UK Media Law (15 credits) - You learn the basics of UK Media Law to enable you to work in a UK newsroom.
  • Political Headlines (15 credits) - You learn the structure of British Government and how it works; and you meet journalists who report and present it.

Career prospects

Students benefit from a central London location, unrivalled industry contacts and a thorough grounding in the best practices of professional journalism.

Recent graduates have gone on to work in both specialist digital roles (such as social media, audience development and data journalism) and as reporters and sub-editors.

According to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (DLHE), previous graduates in employment six months after completing the course earn an average salary of £27,500.

Employers include:

  • Associated Press
  • Google
  • Storyful
  • BuzzFeed
  • Metro
  • BBC
  • Financial Times
  • The Times
  • The Guardian
  • The Daily Telegraph
  • Daily Mirror
  • City AM
  • The Independent
  • Bloomberg News
  • The Daily Mail
  • Property Week
  • MSN
  • Aeon Magazine
  • Manchester Evening News.


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Who is it for?. This course is for students looking to explore international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking to explore international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent. As a result, this MA will particularly appeal to you if you have an interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

The International Communications and Development MA provides will help you to:

  • Gain an overview of the main issues in the field on International Communications and Development.
  • Develop a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology.
  • Conduct detailed analysis of sectors or issues of your own choice, drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.
  • Analyse the main directions of media and communication issues in Britain, the USA, the EU, and countries of your own interest.
  • Develop the ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.
  • Gain the relevant skills for employment in government information departments, communications regulatory agencies, mass media organisations, public relations, advertising, academic and professional research.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small-group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen your knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours, you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organise source material for your coursework, and plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system, which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Assessment and Assessment Criteria

You will submit a 2,500-word essay for each 15-credit module and 3,000-word essay for each 30-credit module. You will also submit a dissertation.

Assessment Criteria are descriptions, based on the intended learning outcomes, of the skills, knowledge or attitudes that you need to demonstrate in order to complete an assessment successfully. This provides a mechanism by which the quality of an assessment can be measured.

Grade-related criteria are descriptions of the level of skills, knowledge or attributes that you need to demonstrate in order achieve a certain grade or mark in an assessment. This provides a mechanism by which the quality of an assessment can be measured and placed within the overall set of marks.

Assessment Criteria and Grade-Related Criteria will be made available to you to help you complete assessments. These may be provided in programme handbooks, module specifications, on the virtual learning environment or attached to a specific assessment task.

Feedback on assessment

Feedback will be provided in line with our Assessment and Feedback Policy. In particular, you will normally be provided with feedback within three weeks of the submission deadline or assessment date. This would normally include a provisional grade or mark.

For end-of-module examinations or an equivalent significant task (e.g. an end-of-module project), feedback will normally be provided within four weeks.  The timescale for feedback on final year projects or dissertations may be longer. Take a look at the full policy for more information.

Assessment Regulations

In order to pass your programme, you should complete successfully or be exempted from the relevant modules and assessments and will therefore acquire the required number of credits.

The pass mark for each module is 50%.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and non-governmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas, such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Core modules

  • Democratisation & Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
  • Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
  • Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective modules

  • Research Design, Methods and Methodology
  • Rationale and Philosophical Foundations of Social Research
  • Introduction to Qualitative Inference
  • Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics (30 credits)
  • Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches (30 credits)
  • Analysing Crime (30 credits)
  • Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (30 credits)
  • Developments in Communication Policy (15 credits)
  • Transnational Media and Communication (15 credits)
  • Celebrity (15 credits)
  • Development and World Politics (15 credits)
  • Religion in Global Politics (15 credits)
  • Evaluation Politics and Advocacy (15 credits)
  • Victims: Policy and Politics (15 credits)
  • Criminal Minds (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits)
  • Applied Qualitative Data Analysis (15 credits)
  • Survey Research Methods (15 credits)
  • Multivariate Data Analysis (15 credits)
  • Statistical Modelling (15 credits)
  • Mediating Gender and Sexuality (15 credits)
  • Digital Cultures

Career prospects

Graduates of this MA have entered a wide variety of careers, including:

  • The civil service
  • Broadcasting
  • Press and telecoms networks
  • NGOs
  • The development sector and consultancies
  • Advertising
  • Marketing
  • Politics
  • Journalism
  • PR
  • Media management
  • Regulatory agencies


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