• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
OCAD University Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
0 miles

University of Leeds, Full Time MA Degrees

We have 96 University of Leeds, Full Time MA Degrees

  • University of Leeds×
  • MA×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 96
Order by 
This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. Read more

This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. You’ll directly address the complex nature of the politics and international relations of the Middle East to gain an oversight of internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations.

Covering a range of approaches from Politics, Comparative Politics and International Relations, it addresses the security, economic, identity and political dynamics of the region. The programme will be of interest to you if you’re wishing to study these issues in more depth and to make comparisons across the region.

You’ll benefit from our specific expertise and research interests in a diverse range of areas relating to the Middle East - with particular focus on security issues, regional relations and the interest of the outside powers in the Middle East, as well as our in-depth research and experience in specific sub-regional areas.

Our academics are widely recognised as leading experts in their field. They boast specialisms in a range of areas: the politics of Islamism; the Persian Gulf; the Israel-Palestine conflict; the international organisations of the Middle East; democratisation in the region and issues of terrorism and insurgency. Teaching on the programme draws upon a network of Middle East specialists based at the University. They come from a range of disciplines and participate in the Middle East Research Group (MERG).

Our rich research culture within the School of Politics and International Studies is specifically focused on the Middle East. It also draws on other regions and cross-cutting themes such as the prevalence of authoritarianism and the problems of democratisation, meaning that there is a combination of focus on the Middle East which is also influenced by wider insights and research focus.

Course content

The compulsory modules will give you the opportunity to:

  • gain an advanced understanding of the issues of security, economy and society across the Middle East
  • undertake a comprehensive analysis of the ever-changing dynamics of this complex region
  • examine the pressing contemporary issues facing the Middle East
  • gain an insight into the internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations
  • study in-depth the ongoing peace negotiations in Israel-Palestine.

You’ll also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

Each semester you will take 60 credits amounting to 120 credits across the whole year. In semester one you will study Contemporary Politics of the Middle East and in semester two you will study The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict, along with your chosen optional modules.

If you’re a part-time student, you’ll take one compulsory module and study some optional modules in your first year. You’ll then take the second compulsory module, the dissertation module and other optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Debating the Middle East: Islam, Politics and Culture 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Nuclear Non-Proliferation and WMD 15 credits
  • Insurgency 15 credits
  • Hezbollah: From Islamic Resistance to Government 15 credits
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities 15 credits
  • Terrorism 15 credits
  • Counterterrorism 15 credits
  • Theoretical Approaches in International Relations 30 credits
  • Civil War and Intrastate Conflict 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Relations and Politics of the Middle East MA Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, lively seminar discussions and weekly readings. We expect you to participate fully in taught sessions and to study independently, developing your skills and preparing for lectures and seminars. You’ll also be able to benefit from an impressive range of research talks and seminars led by outside speakers or colleagues from within the department and University.

Assessment

Within modules, assessment consists of a mixture of essays, exams and group presentations. At the end of your studies, a 12,000 word dissertation will allow you to pursue your own research interest under close supervision by one of our expert colleagues.

Career opportunities

The programme is both academically cutting-edge and policy relevant at a time when the Middle East is undergoing radical change. It will produce graduates who are able to fill the growing need for experts on the region in a variety of industries from oil and investment to security and services. The Middle East is a growing market for many firms who all want to understand the risks and opportunities of working in the region better.

There is a growing market from employers for graduates with expertise in Middle Eastern politics, including NGOs and international institutions; ministries of foreign affairs, trade and defence; as well as consultancy and risk-management/analysis firms engaged in the region.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research. Read more

This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research.

Whether you’re already a teacher or you plan to become one, this degree offers you a deeper understanding of how language is structured, used and interpreted and how this can inform language teaching. Core modules will introduce you to key topics in linguistics such as syntax, phonetics and phonology, as well as teaching methodologies and how they are applied. You’ll also improve your knowledge of research methods in language sciences.

To enhance your knowledge, you’ll choose from optional modules to suit your career plans or interests, on topics such as language acquisition or sociolinguistics. With support from expert tutors within the Language at Leeds research network, you’ll gain valuable skills and a sound knowledge base to prepare you for further research or to inform your teaching practice.

Specialist resources

Leeds is a fantastic place to study linguistics and phonetics. Our tutors and research students are active members of the wider Language at Leeds network which brings together researchers from across the University. You’ll be able to enhance your learning with an array of research events throughout the year.

Postgraduates also have access to our extensive facilities, including the Human Communications Suite complete with a recording studio and lab space for psycholinguistics experiments. You can make use of our phonetics lab and the Language Zone, a state-of-the-art space where you can use a range of language-based teaching materials whenever you want.

This is an academic programme which approaches English language teaching from the perspective of linguistics, and it is therefore not intended for those who are seeking vocational teacher training or classroom experience.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules in your first semester will give you a good grounding in key topics and approaches in linguistics, introducing you to syntax, phonetics, phonology and language acquisition. You’ll also develop the skills you need to study linguistics effectively.

In the following semester you’ll build on this foundation, improving your linguistic research skills while learning about language teaching methodologies and practices. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on topics that interest you, such as pragmatics and language development.

Throughout this programme you’ll develop sophisticated research and analytical skills, as well as a wealth of subject knowledge and teaching techniques. You’ll demonstrate this in your dissertation, where you’ll independently research a topic of your choice and submit the finished product by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Linguistics and Phonetics) 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Methodology in Language Teaching 15 credits
  • Language Teaching in Practice 15 credits
  • Academic Skills in Linguistics 15 credits
  • Research Methods in Linguistics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use diverse teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from our tutors’ expertise. They include seminars, lectures, online learning, tutorials and practicals. Independent study is also a vital element of the course. You’re also encouraged to sit in on classes in modules that you’re not taking, which gives you a great opportunity to gain a broad base of knowledge in linguistics and phonetics.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, assessment methods will vary. However, they usually include coursework , essays and practicals, while core linguistics modules also include exams.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a deeper understanding of human communication and how language is taught and learned. It will also give you high-level research and analysis skills that are valued in all kinds of industries and organisations.

Graduates have pursued a wide range of careers in fields such as language teaching, preparing language teaching materials, lexicography, editing work, the media, marketing and journalism. Many others have pursued PhD level study in fields such as applied linguistics and education.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This innovative programme fuses design with the concepts and principles of advertising, allowing you to develop a range of skills to thrive in a fast-paced and competitive industry. Read more

This innovative programme fuses design with the concepts and principles of advertising, allowing you to develop a range of skills to thrive in a fast-paced and competitive industry.

Taught by the School of Design and Leeds University Business School – one of the world’s top 100 business schools – you’ll take a creative approach to solving communication problems in advertising and branding. You’ll develop your own practice, collaborate with other designers and gain a deeper awareness of how design can convey a brand message, using a range of software and techniques.

At the same time, you’ll study ideas, research and theories in advertising to explore the strategic backdrop of brand communications from the blurring of markets to the ways in which digital technology, such as social media and mobile, have changed the relationship between brands and consumers.

You’ll mix creativity and innovation with advertising strategy to gain a valuable range of knowledge and skills.

Specialist facilities

We have plenty of facilities to help you make the most of your time at Leeds. You’ll be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There’s also a computer-aided design (CAD) suite with access to the latest design software and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing and laser cutting facilities, and colour analysis/prediction labs.

We also have an impressive range of resources you can use for research. We house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history, offering a fascinating insight into the changing nature of branding and advertising over time.

Course content

You’ll begin to develop your understanding of advertising principles from the start of the programme, when you’ll study consumer behaviour and explore how brands can adopt these different theories to inform their marketing strategies.

Focusing on contemporary issues, you’ll look at the process of strategic marketing communications and how strategic marketing works on the global stage. At the same time, you’ll study practical design modules where you’ll learn to visualise creative communications ideas and present your proposals to clients, as well as considering how compelling text within an advertising concept can influence consumers.

In Semester 2 you’ll build on this foundation by exploring integrated communication, developing creative concepts that can work for a range of different media outlets, as well as the broader aspects of campaign planning, print, radio and TV ad production and the ethics of advertising campaigns.

You’ll think about reach, frequency and the often complex question of return on investment and even choose from specialist modules on topics such as social media, sales promotion, brand management and direct marketing.

At the end of the programme you’ll submit a substantial project that demonstrates the knowledge and skills that you’ve gained. You can either complete a dissertation – an independent research project on a related topic of your choice – or develop a communication campaign concept of your own.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Visual Communication 15 credits
  • Persuasion 15 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Consumer Behaviour 15 credits
  • Marketing Communications 10 credits
  • Advertising 15 credits
  • Global Strategic Marketing 15 credits
  • Media Planning and Strategy 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Creative Direction 35 credits
  • Dissertation - Advertising and Design 35 credits
  • Brand Management and Corporate Identity 15 credits
  • Sales Promotion and Sponsorship 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Direct, Digital and Interactive Marketing 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Advertising and Design MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods that reflects the diversity of the programme, including lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical sessions, online learning and group sessions. Independent study is also an important element of this degree, since it allows you to develop your skills as well as your design specialisms.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed by a variety of methods. Obviously these will include your own creative work as you develop campaign concepts in your taught design modules, but also presentations, reflective logs, reports, group projects and written assignments.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to succeed in a dynamic and expanding sector.

You’ll be a confident strategist, planner, account executive or creative advertiser or designer who also understands the relationship between advertising, brand development and consumers. In addition, you’ll have important skills such as oral and written communication, presentations, research, analysis and commercial awareness.

We’ve designed the programme to prepare you for a range of opportunities working in the creative industries, traditional advertising and design agencies, digital and social media. Alternatively, you may want to explore different elements of advertising and design at PhD level.

Students from this programme have successfully gained employment at both traditional and non-traditional advertising agencies all over the world, and in a wide variety of roles including brand management, marketing and more.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Accredited by the. Chartered Institute of Marketing. (CIM), our Masters in Advertising and Marketing allows you to gain specialist knowledge in marketing communications and advertising, alongside comprehensive understanding of key areas of marketing such as strategy, consumer behaviour and research. Read more

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM), our Masters in Advertising and Marketing allows you to gain specialist knowledge in marketing communications and advertising, alongside comprehensive understanding of key areas of marketing such as strategy, consumer behaviour and research.

Taught by specialists with professional experience and research expertise, you’ll gain the skills and knowledge to prepare for a successful career in marketing communications.

The course offers a balanced academic and practical programme, giving you the opportunity to apply your knowledge to genuine business situations. You’ll explore contemporary developments in marketing and marketing communications theory and practice.

Dedicated modules will introduce you to key concepts, frameworks and approaches, whilst equipping you with the skills you need to work in a professional marketing communications or advertising environment. You’ll also select optional modules allowing you to focus on areas that suit your career plans.

Academic excellence

The Marketing division at Leeds University Business School is one of the leading centres of research in marketing in Europe. As part of our research, we engage with companies, senior executives and academics across the globe.

Our research makes an important contribution to your learning on the MA Advertising and Marketing; our academics bring their world-leading expertise to you in the classroom. The Global and Strategic Marketing Research Centre is the Business School’s established and esteemed centre of excellence for scholarly research work.

Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM), giving you the opportunity to gain professional qualifications through CIM Graduate Gateway. This means you can work towards CIM qualifications during your studies, and will receive exemptions from selected assessments.

CIM is the leading professional body for marketers worldwide and exists to develop the marketing profession, maintain professional standards and improve the skills of marketing practitioners.

CIM qualifications are highly sought after by employers, which ensures you are equipped with the best opportunities for a successful marketing career.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study core modules covering different aspects of advertising and marketing.

You will build your understanding of the ways in which brands communicate with their audiences with modules in marketing communications and PR and corporate communications. From there you’ll explore theories and practices of different types of advertising, and examine how organisations plan and develop their media strategies in a changing media landscape. In addition you’ll also gain an insight into important marketing functions of marketing which support brand communications.

Optional modules will give you the chance to shape the programme to suit your interests or career plans. You could focus on sales promotion, brand management and other fields such as social media, digital and interactive marketing.

The course culminates in a final project, which allows you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve gained while focusing on a single topic in-depth. Two options are available – you could complete either a standard research dissertation on a topic of your choice, or a consultancy project, allowing you to work with an external business on a real marketing problem.

Throughout the course you’ll also benefit from a Professional Skills and Employability module, dedicated to developing the key skills employers are looking for when recruiting marketing graduates. Read what our students say about the opportunities for professional development.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll take eight compulsory modules, plus your dissertation, which can be either a research dissertation or marketing consultancy project.

  • Consumer Behaviour 15 credits
  • Marketing Communications 15 credits
  • Advertising 15 credits
  • Global Strategic Marketing 15 credits
  • Media Planning and Strategy 15 credits
  • Public Relations and Corporate Communications 15 credits
  • Marketing Research 15 credits
  • Professional Skills and Employability 15 credits
  • Dissertation OR Marketing Consultancy Project 30 credits

Optional modules

  • You’ll also choose two optional modules.
  • Brand Management and Corporate Identity 15 credits
  • Sales Promotion and Sponsorship 15 credits
  • Social Media Marketing 15 credits
  • Direct, Digital and Interactive Marketing 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Advertising and Marketing MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods so you can benefit from the expertise of our academics, including lectures, workshops, seminars, simulations and tutorials. Company case studies provide an opportunity to put your learning into practice.

Independent study is also vital for this course allowing you to prepare for taught classes and sharpen your own research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

Graduates of the MA Advertising and Marketing can expect to have a wide and varied range of career opportunities in marketing communications agencies and in-house marketing departments.

Previous graduates have become brand managers, research managers, account executives, business development specialists, sales managers and even started their own businesses. Employers include marketing agencies within the advertising and communications sector, retailers, communications groups, commercial banks, education and recruitment agencies.

An increasing number of graduates are working within the rapidly expanding digital, direct and interactive marketing industry.

Careers support

Our dedicated Professional Development Tutor provides tailored academic and careers support to every student. This means you will develop the academic skills to successfully progress through the course, and also the professional skills you will need to secure employment and start a successful career.

You can expect support and guidance on career choices, help in identifying and applying for jobs, as well as one-to-one coaching on interpersonal and communication skills.

Read more about our careers support.



Read less
American culture has often been seen as distinctive and unique, producing some of the world’s greatest writers and artists. Read more

American culture has often been seen as distinctive and unique, producing some of the world’s greatest writers and artists. This exciting and varied degree will allow you to develop a deeper understanding of American literature and its cultural context by looking at specific writers, genres or periods alongside drama, film and photography.

You’ll study core modules developing your research skills and questioning what it means to study literature today, and you’ll undertake an independently researched dissertation on a topic of your choice. You’ll also pursue some of the topics that suit your interests when you choose from a range of optional modules exploring different aspects of American literature and culture, from the 19th century to contemporary writing.

In addition, you’ll be able to broaden your understanding by choosing to take one of your options from the wide range of non-American modules in English Literature that we offer.

Leeds was the first university in Britain to establish a Chair in the field of American Literature. It’s an interest that we continue to uphold with staff researching topics such as American literary culture, masculinity and gender, American film, globalization, postcolonial literature, Jewish narratives and African-American writing. You’ll benefit from all of their expertise and develop your knowledge in our excellent research libraries – a stimulating environment in which to prepare for further study or gain valuable transferable skills.

This degree is also available as a part-time option.

Course content

In Semester 1 you’ll study a core module which will develop your understanding of research methods in literary study, as well as what it means to study literature and culture in the 21st century. You’ll also choose the first of your optional modules to explore topics that suit your interests in more depth.

You’ll then continue to pursue your interests in Semester 2, with two further optional modules. One of your optional modules can be from outside the programme, allowing you to explore topics from Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature to modernist or postcolonial writing.

Throughout the year, you’ll be working on your research project/dissertation, which allows you to research in depth a topic in American literature and culture of your choice. You’ll be able to submit this up to the deadline at the end of the course in September.

If you study this degree on a part-time basis, you’ll take the same number of modules over a longer period, meaning you take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Fictions of Citizenship in Contemporary American Literature 30 credits
  • Feeling Time 30 credits
  • The African American Tradition: Eight Major Works 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read American Literature and Culture MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read American Literature and Culture MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of your modules will be taught in small-group seminars, where you will discuss particular topics in each module with your tutor and the class. Independent study is also an important element of this course, allowing you to develop and then demonstrate valuable skills in independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Most option modules are assessed by one 4,000 word essay. The research project/dissertation is 12,000-15,000 words in length.

Career opportunities

This degree will allow you build on your knowledge and acquire transferable skills that are very attractive to employers.

You’ll have sophisticated research and analytical skills that allow you to consider complex information from different sources, and you’ll also be able to communicate and defend your views clearly either verbally or in writing. You’ll also be comfortable working independently or in a team and have good cultural awareness.

If you’re interested in pursuing further postgraduate study, this degree offers excellent preparation for PhD-level research through the dissertation and research methods modules. However, you’ll also have the skills to succeed in careers in publishing, advertising, broadcasting, journalism, law and teaching.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This online degree will allow you to develop the knowledge and skills to handle ethical issues as they arise in the workplace. It’s specially designed to help people in business, the public sector, the professions, the third sector and walks of life to explore different approaches to ethical problems. Read more

This online degree will allow you to develop the knowledge and skills to handle ethical issues as they arise in the workplace.

It’s specially designed to help people in business, the public sector, the professions, the third sector and walks of life to explore different approaches to ethical problems. You’ll look at the work of philosophers in applied ethics, but you’ll also look at real-life case studies to gain a real understanding of the role of ethics in the professional world. You’ll think about environmental issues, equality and diversity, privacy, consent and professional responsibility, guided by expert tutors at our Interdisciplinary Ethics Applied Centre.

If you want to study without putting your career on hold, this online degree will allow you to study in your own time, wherever you are in the world. You’ll be able to discuss issues with professionals from a variety of backgrounds to gain a real insight into the ethical dimensions of workplace situations.

Students come from a wide range of professional backgrounds, and you’ll discuss ideas and share expertise with people from around the world. Current and recent students have studied while working in demanding roles for organisations such as UN agencies, the UK Police Force and the Commonwealth Secretariat, or in law, actuarial professions, development, engineering, management, dentistry and more.

This programme is also available to study full-time, and you could also study for a PGDip qualification where you take fewer modules overall. If you don’t have a degree, we usually ask you to register for the PGDip programme – you can upgrade to the MA if you progress successfully.

If you’re still not sure about applying to study for the MA, you could consider studying a single Applied and Professional Ethics Module as a stand-alone short course.

Course content

In your first year you’ll be introduced to principles and approaches in the study of ethics, and look at key workplace issues such as professional responsibility. You’ll then build on your knowledge as you go through the rest of the core modules – you’ll look at issues such as confidentiality, consent, contracts and diversity. You’ll be able to swap one module for an independent project, usually related to your line of work.

Throughout the degree you’ll be deepening your knowledge, improving your skills and gaining a new perspective on ethical issues. You’ll showcase all of this in your dissertation, where you’ll independently research a topic of your choice. You’ll submit this before the end of the programme in September of your final year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits
  • Professional Issues 1 15 credits
  • Agents and Professional Responsibility 15 credits
  • Dissertation (MA students) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Professional Issues 2: Privacy and Confidentiality 15 credits
  • Professional Issues 3: Consent and Contracts 15 credits
  • Justice: Fairness, Equality and Diversity 15 credits
  • Global Environmental Ethics 15 credits
  • Business Ethics 15 credits
  • Professional Ethics Project

For more information on typical modules, read Applied and Professional Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This degree is taught entirely online, so there are no lectures or seminars. You won’t even have to attend Leeds at any point during the course, although if you can travel there may be chances to meet other students. Instead, you’ll used specially designed interactive teaching materials and participate in structured collaborative activities. You’ll contribute to discussion groups in our Virtual Learning Environment, so you can share experiences and perspectives with students from different backgrounds worldwide.

Read more about Online Distance Learning

Assessment

Because you study online, you won’t have to take any exams during this programme. Instead, most of the time you will be assessed using essays and coursework assignments. You’ll receive support from our tutors and be able to discuss your work with them before you submit it. Group projects, presentations and regular contributions to discussion forums may also be used to assess your progress in some modules.

Career opportunities

Studying applied ethics will allow you to develop transferable skills in research, critical thinking and communication. It will also give you more confidence to handle situations with ethical implications in the workplace.

All of this is good preparation for a range of careers, while it could also benefit you in your current role. In particular, the programme gives you scope to develop your career in growing areas such as compliance and corporate social responsibility.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




Read less
If you have a background in music or psychology, this programme will allow you to study existing research and theories in the psychology of music while continuing to follow your own musical interests. Read more

If you have a background in music or psychology, this programme will allow you to study existing research and theories in the psychology of music while continuing to follow your own musical interests.

You’ll develop your knowledge of qualitative and quantitative research methods, building your own research skills while learning to critically evaluate studies in the field of music psychology. Using real-world case studies you’ll explore areas such as music education, therapy, advertising, science and technology – but you’ll also be able to take optional modules in composition, performance, musicology, aesthetics, editing, electronic and computer music or other aspects of music.

Taught by experts in world-class facilities, you’ll gain an insight into the importance and role of research in music psychology to prepare you for further research or a wider range of careers.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Take a virtual tour of the School of Music.

Course content

Core modules that run throughout the year will develop your knowledge of music psychology, as well as your understanding of research methods. You’ll focus on case studies in different areas of the subject, gaining a sense of the key issues, debates and theories and becoming confident evaluating and using quantitative and qualitative techniques to collect data.

At the same time, you’ll select from optional modules that allow you to pursue your interests in different areas of music such as aesthetics, musicology, audience engagement, composition, performance, editing and archival studies, electronic and computer music or musicology. For some of these modules, we may need to see evidence of your ability before you begin – see ‘How to apply’ for more information.

By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve gained when you submit your dissertation – an independent piece of research, with an empirical component, on a topic of your choice within music psychology.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits
  • Research Techniques in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

Optional modules

You’ll then choose one from the optional modules below.

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • International Research Project 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Psychology of Music MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Psychology of Music MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. These will include seminars, tutorials and lectures in some modules, as well as instrumental or vocal lessons with our expert tutors if you select performance modules. However, independent study is crucial to this degree, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your interests at your own pace.

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed using a range of methods, including presentations, bibliographic exercises, essays and group project work. Specialised music modules will also use relevant methods of assessment, such as compositions, recitals, critical editions and commentaries on musical sources.

Career opportunities

This programme will allow you to gain a range of transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication. All of these can be applied in musical as well as non-musical contexts.

Recent graduates have gone on to launch careers within the fields of music education, music advertising, business development, marketing and administration, and artist management. Others have also continued with their research at PhD level.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
If you’re passionate about using theatre to help stimulate processes of change in the lives of individuals and communities then this is the course for you. Read more

If you’re passionate about using theatre to help stimulate processes of change in the lives of individuals and communities then this is the course for you.

You’ll gain the skills to become an applied theatre practitioner. Through practice and theory you will explore applied theatre in all of its forms including community theatre, theatre-in-education, theatre and health, prison theatre, theatre for development and the arts therapies.

You’ll gain a broad understanding of some of the wider issues faced by applied theatre practitioners including ethics, boundaries, evaluation, policy and funding and have the opportunity to apply your learning in a placement context.

Core modules will look at practice-based workshop techniques and the development of facilitation skills; concepts and theories underpinning applied theatre and interventionist practice; and research training. You will also choose from optional modules that will allow you to pursue your personal interests.

Our purpose-built landmark building [email protected] houses two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host work by both students and visiting theatre companies – one of which is a technically advanced research facility.

Find out more about [email protected].

Our School includes rehearsal rooms, two black-box studios, costume construction and wardrobe stores, a design studio and scenic workshop, video editing and sound recording suits as well as computer aided design.

Our links with external organisations are among our biggest strengths, giving you the chance to take performance to different environments outside of the university context. We’re always developing new relationships with partners in different contexts to offer you more opportunities to participate.

Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse, the National Media Museum, Leeds City Council, Red Ladder Theatre Company, Limehouse Productions, Phoenix Dance Theatre, the National Coal Mining Museum for England, HMP New Hall, Blah Blah Blah Theatre Company, the BBC and HMP Wetherby are all among our partners.

Course content

Core modules allow you to develop the skills to facilitate workshops with different groups of people in a variety of contexts, along with an understanding of the historical and philosophical underpinnings of applied theatre practice, the key ideas within this practice and some of the complex issues that can arise.

As you progress through the course you will have the opportunity to apply your practical and theoretical learning within an applied theatre context through a placement. This may be with an established applied theatre organisation or in a setting where applied theatre is practiced such as a hospital, school or young offenders’ institute.

Alongside these modules you will develop research skills through a core module alongside students on other programmes within the school. You’ll explore a range of research methods and consider the roles and responsibilities of the researcher, ethics, data gathering and analysis. You are also able to choose an optional module to further pursue your own personal areas of interest.

In the latter part of the programme you will work closely with your supervisor to undertake a research project on a topic of your choice, allowing you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve gained. This could be a conventional written dissertation or a piece of practice-led research with a written commentary.

If you choose to study part-time, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Applied Theatre Practices 30 credits
  • Critical Concepts in Applied Theatre and Intervention 30 credits
  • Research Perspectives (Applied Theatre & Intervention) 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Creative Work 30 credits
  • Performance and Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Cultural Policy: Models and Debates 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Theatre and Intervention MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Applied Theatre and Intervention MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including practical workshops, group learning, lectures, seminars, tutorials and fieldwork. Independent learning is central to this programme, allowing you to integrate your learning and develop your understanding and skills.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of methods including practical assessments, written work, presentations and reflective logs. This diversity allows you to begin to integrate theory and practice, develop a range of skills and become a reflective practitioner.

Career opportunities

Applied theatre is a wide field, which is constantly developing in response to social and economic changes.

This programme will equip you with a range of skills within the area of applied theatre. You’ll have an understanding of applied theatre and its use as an intervention as well as advanced skills in communication, collaboration, presentation, analysis and research. You’ll be able to set up, lead and facilitate workshops as an applied theatre practitioner with diverse groups of people in a variety of health, social and community contexts.

You may decide to apply your learning in the context of arts administration or arts policy work. You may wish to further your understanding by undertaking specialist professional training in areas like the arts therapies (dramatherapy, dance movement psychotherapy, music therapy or art psychotherapy), play therapy, teaching; or pursue your research interests at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. Read more

This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. You’ll also work with students specialising in a wide range of languages to produce multilingual translation projects.

You can specialise in translation between English and one or two languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. In addition, you’ll be able to choose from optional modules informed by the research of our experts on topics such as audiovisual translations, machine translation and genre analysis.

You’ll be taught by both leading researchers and contracted practitioners through our Centre for Translation Studies, to equip you with a good knowledge base and practical skills to launch an exciting career.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. A core module will run throughout the year developing your skills through multilingual group projects, which also give you valuable experience of translation project management.

You’ll study another core module introducing you to approaches and research methods in translation studies, then choose optional modules to build your specialist written translation skills between English and one or two languages of your choice. You could also choose from any of the research-led optional modules exploring topics such as audio-visual translation or genre analysis.

Throughout the year, you’ll be sharpening your skills and developing your theoretical and practical understanding of translation. You’ll showcase this in your summer project, which you’ll hand in by the end of the course in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period. If you take the PGDip, you’ll study the same content but without completing the summer project.

Compulsory modules:

  • Computer-Assisted Translation 45 credits
  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. If completing the MSc you’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Applied Translation Studies equips you with valuable skills that are increasingly important in a globalised world. You’ll also develop advanced IT, research, analysis and communication skills that are very attractive to employers across different industries.

Many of our students go straight into practice with their translation skills, whether they work in large organisations, small or medium-sized language service providers or as freelance translators. Others pursue related careers such as project management or administrative roles in language services. They work in organisations such as the UN and affiliated organisations, the European Parliament and European Commission, commercial enterprises and NGOs.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



Read less
This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice. Read more

This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice.

You’ll work with a range of text types, including journalistic, administrative, technical and literary texts. You’ll also deepen your knowledge of methods, approaches and concepts in translation studies.

You’ll also choose optional modules that suit your interests and career aspirations, on issues in translation and language more generally, such as Arabic/English stylistics, translation for international organisations, computer-assisted translation, applied linguistics and genre analysis.

Taught by expert researchers and contracted practitioners, this programme makes use of the expertise across the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies within the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies. It’s a great opportunity to learn valuable skills in a city full of cultural and linguistic diversity.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Throughout the programme you’ll develop your understanding of theories, approaches and methods in translation studies through a core module. You’ll then apply that knowledge in your specialised translation modules, when you’ll gain the intercultural skills to make sound translation decisions and build skills in computer-assisted translation.

You’ll complete the course with your choice from a range of optional modules to suit your interests and career plans. You could expand your knowledge of translation by studying translation for international organisations, comparative Arabic/English stylistics, or explore broader topics such as genre analysis in translation or different aspects of applied linguistics like language acquisition or syntax.

By the end of the course in September, you’ll submit work which showcases the skills you’ve acquired – this could be a long translation, long dissertation or shorter versions of both.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 1 15 credits
  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 2 15 credits
  • Long Annotated Translation 60 credits
  • Long Dissertation 60 credits
  • Short Annotated Translation 30 credits
  • Translation for International Organisations (English-Arabic)15 credits
  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Computers and the Translator 15 credits
  • Introduction to Screen Translation 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics for Translators 15 credits
  • English for Translators 15 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Introduction to Interpreting Skills 15 credits
  • Genres in Translation 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Literary Translation 15 credits
  • English in International Communication 30 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation A 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation B 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation B 15 credits
  • Dissertation: Translation Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies run a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as areessays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on yourindividual summer project, which can be either a long annotated translation, a long dissertation, or a combination of a short annotated translation and short dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with practical translation skills between two major world languages which are increasingly valuable to a wide range of employers across industries.

It’s excellent preparation for working in fields where Arabic is a working language, or where translation in and out of Arabic is needed. These include foreign diplomacy, the media, NGOs and international organisations, the travel and tourism sector, teaching and areas of the publishing, cultural and marketing industries.

Other graduates progress to PhD research, or work as specialised freelance translators.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The MA Art Gallery and Museum Studies aims to provide students with critical understandings of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

The MA Art Gallery and Museum Studies aims to provide students with critical understandings of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. The course considers the ways in which material culture has been represented and interpreted by historians and cultural theorists, the methodologies behind museum practice and methods of display and interpretation, and also puts theory and practice into dialogue.

Through the course, students develop critical understandings of the histories of art galleries and museums and explore and challenge key ideas that have shaped museum practice. Students will also deploy these historical and theoretical understandings to develop innovative approaches to curation, interpretation and engaging audiences.

You will develop practical skills through working on an interpretation project in our archives and collections on campus, and undertaking a negotiated work placement. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you will gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

You will study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a wide variety of world-leading and innovative arts and heritage organisations, from the Royal Armouries, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse and Northern Ballet through to nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many contemporary art spaces.

We are also close to everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Science and Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Brontë Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

Course content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation.

This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • History and the Museum: Representation, Narrative and Memory 30 credits
  • Museum, Object, Practice 30 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • Dissertation 50 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory and the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Critical and Curatorial Challenges in Contemporary Art: The Documenta Exhibitions at Kassel 1992-2012 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Art Gallery and Museum Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Art Gallery and Museum Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

You’ll also learn from practical experience when you undertake your work placement, and a variety of external speakers will give you an insight into contemporary practice in the sector. Independent study is an important element of the degree, allowing you to develop your research and critical skills.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work.

It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to art gallery and museum studies, as well as practical work experience – a combination which is very valuable to employers. You’ll also develop advanced skills in communication, research and analysis as well as cultural awareness.

Our graduates now work as heads of collection, curators and education staff in local authority museums, for national heritage organisations like the National Trust, charitable trusts and in arts marketing and public relations.

A significant number have also returned as research students and have secured scholarships to pursue their research topics, including Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) scholarships. Former research students are now forging academic careers in the UK, Canada and the US.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.



Read less
Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today. Read more

Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today.

Core modules explore the nature of heritage and how meanings of objects, artworks and buildings change in different contexts. You will examine the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders, and the changes that have led some museums to move towards the role of the ‘manager’ rather than the ‘curator’.

You will choose from optional modules to tailor your degree to your interests or career plans – including the opportunity to undertake a work placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

Supported by our Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you will benefit from our partnerships with major arts and cultural organisations to find out what it means to work in this challenging sector.

You will study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a wide variety of world-leading and innovative arts and heritage organisations, from the Royal Armouries, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse and Northern Ballet through to nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many contemporary art spaces.

We are also close to everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Science and Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Brontë Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Interdisciplinary learning

This exciting programme has been developed in close collaboration with the School of Performance and Cultural Industries and allows students to undertake core and optional courses in both Schools. Students become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy the opportunities that membership offers.

Course content

All MA students in the School take two core modules.

In Arts Management and Cultural Leadership, students will examine theoretical concepts in the emerging field of arts management and the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders. Dialogue with our arts and cultural partners will give an insight into the exciting possibilities opened up by bringing theory and practice together. Students can deepen their learning in this area through optional modules that explore a variety of key issues, such as audience engagement and impact, cultural entrepreneurship, and contemporary cultural strategies, technologies and media.

In Heritage Studies: Key Words, students will develop a critical exploration of heritage through the ways in which people have sought to preserve, understand and pass on their cultures. This is underpinned through combining a sustained theoretical engagement with key ideas which animate heritage – place, community, memory, archive, future – with embedded skills development in heritage and museum interpretative and curatorial practice (which are a core set of sector skills). Students can build on these skills through optional modules such as exploring anthropology and representation, cultural memory and material culture.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Performance and Cultural Industries. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to allow students to benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures.

Students will also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this course, allowing students to develop individual skills and prepare for taught sessions

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Arts Management and Heritage Studies Dissertation 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Heritage Studies: Key Words 30 credits
  • Arts Management and Cultural Leadership 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory & the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art & Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art & Representation 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Performance & Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement & Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures. You’ll also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your individual skills and prepare for taught sessions.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you may experience a range of different assessment methods. These usually include essays of around 7,000 words, individual and group presentations, in-course assessment and project work. You may also be asked to complete a reflective log for your projects, allowing you to look back and critically assess your own practice.

Placement opportunities

All students have a choice of two optional modules. A number of these modules have a work or enterprise component to gain first-hand experience of contemporary museum and gallery practice. If you have a particular ambition in mind for a work placement, we try to find a role that suits you.




Read less
This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation. Read more

This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation.

You’ll work between English and one or two languages, including Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. You’ll also have the chance to study modules informed by research taking place at our Centre for Translation Studies on topics such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation, interpreting and genre analysis.

Leading researchers work alongside contracted practitioners to equip you with a range of practical skills, as well as a solid understanding of the principles that underpin audiovisual translation. It’s an opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills to launch an exciting career in a growing industry.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted audiovisual translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. In addition to the processes and practices of professional audiovisual translation, core modules will introduce you to essential concepts in translation studies

In addition you’ll choose optional modules specialising in translation from one or two languages, while you can also choose from modules informed by the research of our experts in key areas such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation or genre analysis. You’ll also complete a summer project by the end of the programme in September, which could take the form of extended translations, a dissertation or subtitling project.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits
  • Audiovisual Translation: Processes, Strategies and Industry-Driven Practice 30 credits
  • Monolingual Subtitling 15 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities. In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Audiovisual Translation Studies equips you with valuable practical skills, underpinned by a solid theoretical foundation. You’ll also develop advanced skills in IT, research, communication and analysis that are very valuable to employers.

Graduates have launched careers in subtitling and translation in locations such as London, Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo. They work for organisations such as the BBC, UN, World Bank and World Trade Organization, as well as major translation companies. Many also go on to work as freelancers, making use of the experience and significant networks that they start to build at Leeds.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



Read less
This degree uses specially designed online teaching materials to give you an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors. Read more

This degree uses specially designed online teaching materials to give you an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors.

You’ll learn about the ethical issues that arise across medicine and healthcare practice, but you’ll also have the opportunity to specialise in areas that interest you or suit your career aspirations. You’ll take modules on topics such as ethical issues at the beginning and end of life, autonomy and psychiatry, professional issues and allocating medical resources fairly, and focus on a topic of your choice to complete an independent dissertation.

We’re constantly developing the course and consulting with professionals working in the field, so it’s informed by the most recent developments in practice. But you’ll be guided by active researchers with expertise in teaching ethics across medical disciplines, giving you the chance to engage with the latest academic arguments and debates.

The programme is designed for people who’ve never studied ethics or medical ethics, although we do also have applicants who have studied philosophy before. If you’re interested in thinking about key ethical issues in a reasoned and independent way, you’ll be able to explore big questions in the biomedical and healthcare spheres with the support of the Interdisciplinary Ethics Applied Centre (IDEA).

This course is also available to study part-time and/or on campus. You could also choose to study for PGDip qualification, where you’ll study fewer modules overall.

Course structure

COMPULSORY MODULES

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits
  • Health Care Ethics: Dissertation 60 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life (Online)15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life (Online)15 credits
  • Conscience, Codes and Professional Issues (Online)15 credits
  • Autonomy, Rationality, and Psychiatric Issues (Online)15 credits
  • Distributive Justice and Scarce Medical Resources (Online)15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics (Online)30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biomedical and Healthcare Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

There are no lectures or seminars on this programme. Instead you’ll use the University’s Virtual Learning Environment to access interactive course materials and participate in collaborative activities online. This allows you to share your experiences and insights with students from a variety of backgrounds to discover new perspectives on ethical issues. Our tutors respond to queries by email as well as contributing to the online discussion groups.

Read more about Online Distance Learning.

Assessment

You’ll still be assessed using essays, but we use a range of other methods to make the most of online learning. You’ll complete shorter written assignments and group projects, and you’ll also be assessed on the contributions you make to group discussions.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in biomedical and healthcare ethics can improve your confidence in handling workplace decisions that have ethical implications. It will also allow you to improve your transferable skills such as research, analysis and oral and written communication.

Many of our graduates continue with their research, whether in academic appointments at universities, PhD studies or as researchers for other organisations such as the King’s Fund. Others have gone into healthcare management, joined research or clinical ethics committees or gone on to teach medical or healthcare ethics at medical schools part-time.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This degree allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors. Read more

This degree allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of professional ethics, and what they mean for practitioners in the biomedical and healthcare sectors.

You’ll learn about the ethical issues that arise across medicine and healthcare practice, but you’ll also have the opportunity to specialise in areas that interest you or suit your career aspirations. You’ll take modules on topics such as ethical issues at the beginning and end of life, autonomy and psychiatry, professional issues and allocating medical resources fairly, and focus on a topic of your choice to complete an independent dissertation.

We’re constantly developing the course and consulting with professionals working in the field, so our courses are informed by the most recent developments in practice. But you’ll be taught by active researchers with expertise in teaching ethics across medical disciplines, giving you the chance to engage with the latest academic arguments and debates.

The programme is designed for people who’ve never studied ethics or medical ethics, although we do also have applicants who have studied philosophy before. If you’re interested in thinking about key ethical issues in a reasoned and independent way, you’ll be able to explore big questions in the biomedical and healthcare spheres with the support of the Interdisciplinary Ethics Applied Centre (IDEA).

This course is also available to study part-time and/or online. You could also choose to study for a PGDip qualification, where you’ll study fewer modules overall.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Reason, Virtues and Obligation 15 credits
  • Conscience, Codes and Professional Issues 15 credits
  • Autonomy, Rationality and Psychiatric Issues 15 credits
  • Distributive Justice and Scarce Medical Resources 15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics 30 credits
  • Health Care Ethics: Dissertation 60 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life 15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biomedical and Healthcare Ethics MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biomedical and Healthcare Ethics MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Taught modules are structured around weekly group seminars led by one of our tutors. Overall, each taught module normally involves about four hours per week of contact time. In some modules you may also take part in group project work. However, independent study is also a vital element of this degree, allowing you to improve your research and analytical skills and gain more varied perspectives on key issues.

Assessment

Essays are our most common form of assessment – usually of around 3,000 words. However, in some modules we may also use presentations or other methods to assess your progress.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in biomedical and healthcare ethics can improve your confidence in handling workplace decisions that have ethical implications. It will also allow you to improve your transferable skills such as research, analysis and oral and written communication.

Many of our graduates continue with their research, whether in academic appointments at universities, PhD studies or as researchers for other organisations such as the King’s Fund. Others have gone into healthcare management, joined research or clinical ethics committees or gone on to teach medical or healthcare ethics at medical schools part-time.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X