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Cardiff University, Full Time MA Degrees

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Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest. Read more
Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest.

The first of its kind in the UK, the interdisciplinary MA in Ancient and Medieval Warfare offers archaeological, historical and literary approaches to the subject.

The course consists of a flexible combination of taught modules and individual research, which enables you to specialise in a specific period if you wish, or, if you prefer, to study a particular theme across a wider timespan.

The course provides a solid foundation of research skills which can serve as a basis for doctoral research, but it also provides transferable skills, which will be valuable for a career in any field.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the history and development of warfare in the Ancient and Medieval worlds
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches

Structure

The course can be completed in 1 year by full-time study or completed part-time over three years.

You take a mix of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits. On successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to your dissertation (60 credits).

You research and write a dissertation (20,000 words) on a topic or theme of your choice in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Themes in Ancient and Medieval Warfare
Ancient and Medieval Warfare Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes (depending on modules chosen).

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

Prospects

Our graduates typically find employment with organisations such as: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Element Productions, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government, national and international universities.

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Discover the history, society and culture of the Greek and Roman world, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme. Read more
Discover the history, society and culture of the Greek and Roman world, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme.

Under the supervision of leading experts, you can pursue your own interests from Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity.

Distinctive features:

• Freedom to select optional modules tailored to your interests.

• Additional opportunity to specialise :

- Art and archaeology
- Warfare
- Late Antique and Byzantine worlds

Structure

You take a total of 180 credits of modules over one year (two semesters) for full-time study or over two years for part-time study. This includes 120 credits of taught modules.

Following successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation (60 credits).

For this element of the programme you research and write your 20,000 words on a subject of your choice, approved in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Themes and Approaches in Ancient History
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes. As part of the programme, you will be supported to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

The taught element of the MA runs from October to May, and combines research training modules, study of an ancient language, and a choice of specialised options (listed below). It is also possible to take a residential course at the British School in Athens or the British School in Rome, subject to British School admission.

During the taught stage of the MA, you lay the foundations for the second part of the course, which is an individual research project, carried out between May and September, leading up to a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

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Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching. Read more
Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching.

The programme incorporates three broad areas of study: research methodology; language description and comparison; and specialised topics in language and social life, foreign language teaching and multimodality.

Distinctive features:

Our Centre for Language and Communication Research has an international reputation as a field leader in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multimodal communication, systemic functional linguistics, forensic linguistics, and formulaic language.

Structure

Students can complete a Postgraduate Diploma or an MSc in Applied Linguistics. The course can be taken on a full-time basis or part-time basis. You will complete the programme in 1 year for full-time study and in 2 years for part-time study.

There are three compulsory modules in the Applied Linguistics programmes. You will also select three further modules from a pool of optional modules.

• PGDip core modules:

Language Description
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Phonology

• PGDip optional modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same as PGDip core modules with the addition of a dissertation.

• MSc optional modules:

Same as PGDip.

Teaching

The teaching for each module combines discussion of theoretical issues with training in analytical methods often based on texts of your own choosing.

Learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

You are expected to do the reading and other relevant preparation to enable them to take a full part in these activities and are encouraged to explore the resources of the library as appropriate.

Assessment

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will often be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest.

Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments. Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for disabled students, if any, are noted in the Module Descriptions.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study in the School is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much-enhanced career prospects while many UK students use the qualification to travel to new countries, often as teachers of English, or to begin academic careers of their own.

Outside education and academia, the principle avenues of employment for graduates are speech therapy, the creative and media sector, administration and publishing.

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Enhance your understanding of Archaeology by region and period, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme. Read more
Enhance your understanding of Archaeology by region and period, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme.

Renowned for our particular expertise in the British Isles, Europe and the Mediterranean area, our experts teach from the Neolithic through to the Celtic, Roman and Viking periods.

You will be able to critically assess the work of others and of your own, to engage effectively in debate at an advanced level, to plan, design and carry out a coherent research strategy, and to produce detailed and coherent reports and presentations. The wide-range of transferable skills acquired are a particular strength for the pursuit of careers outside of archaeology and the heritage sector.

In addition to our general MA Archaeology programme we offer three pathways to shape your studies. You can choose the pathway that best suits you. The pathway you choose will determine the modules you go on to study.

The three pathways are:

• European Neolithic
• Prehistoric Britain
• Early Medieval Society and Culture

Structure

This course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in 3 years by part-time study.

Taught Stage:

You will take two core modules (40 credits) and four optional modules (80 credits). The options you take will depend on the pathway you choose.

Dissertation Stage:

On successful completion of the taught course element you will go on to complete your dissertation (60 credits). This takes the form of an individual research project, resulting in a dissertation of around 20,000 words.

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
MA Archaeology Dissertation

For a list of the optional modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/archaeology-ma

For a list of the optional modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/archaeology-ma-part-time

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and practicals in the archaeology laboratories.

As part of the programme, you will deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and coursework.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

This self-regulated year of study is ideal preparation for progression to PhD.

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have embarked on careers in a range of professions from academia, the heritage sector, journalism and law to media research (media, commercial, academic), teaching and publishing. A significant number choose to continue studies at PhD level.

Recent destinations include: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government and a range of universities in the UK and overseas.

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This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect. Read more
This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect.  It shares many of the design elements of our established MArch (Master of Architecture/ Part 2) programme, but provides greater flexibility in terms of study choices, allowing you to engage with the interests of our research staff. 

In the programme, we will focus on using design-led research to inform your learning and investigation. You will develop your existing design skills by focussing on how design thinking might address current global challenges. This approach offers an intense and lively forum for the exploration and discussion of design issues. This is why we place particular emphasis on using design as a means to conduct research. Researching through design is a creative activity that closely integrates the process of designing with the act of researching, so that they can mutually inform each other.  You will explore problems by making and testing design propositions, introducing and developing established knowledge as and when required.  Through project work, you will draw on knowledge from many disciplines.

You will work in small groups called ‘design units’ under the guidance of an experienced tutor and also work independently to develop a research-focussed approach to your studies. This will require you to question and evaluate evidence and think creatively and iteratively. Emphasis will be on individual discovery and personal reflection as a learning process.

Distinctive features

• Study in one of the top Schools of Architecture in the UK
• Supported by the School’s award-winning Design Research Unit Wales (DRUw) 
• Learn from notable design-led practitioners; currently more than 50% of our design programmes are delivered by practising architects
• Perfect for students who prefer a more practical/active approach to learning through our focus on investigation through design
• Choose from a range of optional modules to supplement your learning in areas of interest to you and develop important skills in design-based research

Structure

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis. You will be based in the Welsh School of Architecture for the duration of the programme. The taught element of this programme is structured around a 60 credit design module, where you will use techniques of research through design to explore an issue of interest related to one of the School’s design units.  This will normally run between October and April and will conclude with a final presentation in front of a panel of reviewers. Your work in the design studio is complimented by a 30 credit module analysing architectural precedent, and a choice of optional study modules.

You will usually start the dissertation element of the programme in May and complete this over the summer. The dissertation is the culmination of your design research throughout the programme.  The dissertation usually comprises of a documented design project, accompanied by a 5000 word critical commentary.  Support for developing the necessary skills of research through design will be provided during the taught elements of the programme.

During your year on the programme, you will focus on developing a design-research agenda, defining and establishing your own position in architectural design. The topics covered are usually structured around thematic studios, or ‘units’ led by design tutors who have expertise and interest in specific areas of research and/ or practice. The themes are often related to areas of research expertise within the School and may be run in conjunction with the units offered on the MArch programme.

You will undertake analysis of architectural precedent within the studio environment and choose 30 credits worth of optional modules, chosen from a list of subjects based on the research interests of the staff in the school. This list is reviewed on an annual basis. You can choose any combination of 10 and 20 credit modules for your option. 

For your dissertation you will work independently using the skills that have been developed during the taught programme to develop a critical research argument through design.  This will involve completing a design thesis project. You will be expected to supplement this with a 5000 word critical written commentary.

Core modules:

Architectural Design and Research
Analysis of Precedent
Design Thesis (Dissertation)

Optional modules:

Issues in Contemporary Architecture
Design Principles and Methods 3
Earth and Society
Low Carbon Footprint
Climate Comfort & Energy
Architectural Technology 3a

Assessment

Design projects and related exercises are assessed continuously, often through pin-up reviews and symposia where feedback is given. At the end of the year, a portfolio of all design-related work is presented for formal examination by panels of reviewers.

Optional modules are usually assessed through written examination and coursework submitted during the semester. Please read the module descriptions for your chosen optional modules to find out more about the ways they are assessed.

The criteria by which assessments are made are contained in the School’s Teaching Handbook, in project and coursework documentation, and explained at introduction to the various modules and design projects.

Career Prospects

Whilst many of our graduates will choose to undertake a career within architecture or other built environment professions, the programme provides a large number of transferable skills which will be of benefit across a wide range of professions.  The focus on independent, project based learning is welcomed by employers in that it provides graduates with skills in creative thinking, conceptual organisation, critical reflection and taking initiative.

Fieldwork

During the course we go on a range of study trips in the UK, Europe, or further afield. On these trips we will organise guided visits to buildings that demonstrate how principles taught in the programme are applied in revolutionary large-scale eco-buildings. You will also have the opportunity to meet architects and built environment professionals who collaborate with the School. In the past, students have travelled to Barcelona, Venice, Rome and the Ruhr Valley, amongst other places.

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The MA Broadcast Journalism is aimed at people who have decided to pursue a career in radio or television news and current affairs. Read more
The MA Broadcast Journalism is aimed at people who have decided to pursue a career in radio or television news and current affairs. Our aim is to help you to get your first job in a highly competitive industry.

All journalists need to know how to find and research stories, how to interview people and how to write well. These days, that’s not enough. Modern broadcast newsrooms are digital and multi-media. Entry-level journalists are expected to be multi-skilled and familiar with the latest technology.

We use digital TV and radio studios to teach you how to gather and broadcast your content. We also organise a three-week industry placement for you to put into practice the skills we teach.

We will encourage you to originate and distribute your stories through the latest social channels. Are you comfortable using Twitter, Instagram, or Steller in a professional way? You will be by the time you leave us.

We are looking for people who can demonstrate a keen interest in news. We expect you to be engaged with what’s happening in the world. If you regularly watch and listen to TV and radio news programmes, that’s a good starting point.

We also look for people who already have some evidence of their commitment to a career in journalism. This could be acquired through student journalism or work placements in a newsroom. We don’t mind what subject you have studied at undergraduate level.

You will leave us with an MA that is widely recognised as being at the forefront of postgraduate training for a broadcasting career in digital multi-media newsrooms. Your time with us will be hard work, but hopefully it will be rewarding, and the beginning of an exciting career.

Distinctive features:

• MA Broadcast Journalism is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council
• Industry placements in the second semester
• An outstanding alumni network across the media

Structure

This is a year-long course.

Broadcast journalism skills are acquired through a series of lectures, demonstrations, practical exercises and feedback sessions of increasing complexity and realism - from 'paper exercises' in the early days to complex radio and television productions that report on real events in real time. These sessions are supplemented by seminars, playbacks, group discussions and industry guests.

Basic writing, reporting and technical skills are taught in the first semester against a background of group listening and viewing to good current professional practice.

The second semester adds editorial and production skills in both radio and television. We use the device of twice weekly ‘production days’ to integrate newsgathering and production skills with the team working and editorial/resource management skills needed to produce real-time broadcast outputs.

During the Easter break you will test your skills against the real world in a work placement (or placements) of a minimum three weeks duration in a radio or television newsroom of your choice.

Following the Easter recess you will have the opportunity to study from a wide and varied selection of elective modules which include sports, motoring, business and data journalism.

Finally individual writing, reporting and storytelling skills are tested in both media are tested in the final portfolio of work and the final practical examinations.

Your major project will be self-accessed and student-led. You will originate, research and produce a story that will be delivered for radio, television and online.

Core modules:

Public Administration
Reporters and the Reported
Digital Journalism
Broadcast Journalism
Broadcast News Production
Broadcast News Reporting & Production
Media Law and Ethics
Professional Development
Major Project

Optional modules:

Motoring Journalism
Business and Financial Journalism
Lifestyle & Consumer Journalism
Political Reporting
Sports Journalism
Data Journalism
Yr Agenda Cymreig

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of practical workshops, studio time and productions days which replicate an industry environment as well as lecture series to support the more academic elements of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical class room activities to academic essays and examinations.

Career prospects

This is a period of great change in all fields of journalism – including broadcast – but our employment record continues to be good.

Our graduates typically leave us to work as broadcast journalists in local radio or regional TV newsrooms. Recent graduates are now working for organisations like BBC and ITV News, SKY, CNN, Reuters, Bloomberg and Al Jazeera English. Over the years we have helped hundreds of people to start their careers in broadcast journalism. Many are now working at the top of the profession.

Placement

You will undertake a 15 day industry placement during the Easter break. Placements are co-ordinated by the course tutors and take into account your geographical preferences. Placements may be in radio or TV newsrooms, or both.

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Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing. Read more
Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing.

Developing your creative writing abilities and ideas beyond first degree, you will attend workshops, produce a portfolio of creative writing, attend classes in various topics in creative writing and gain experience in teaching creative writing.

A series of complementary courses stress an integrated experience of literary development and pedagogy of creative writing.

You will master the ability to independently produce literary works of refinement and skill, and to conduct writers’ workshops. You will also develop your knowledge and skills in the writing of one or more literary genre(s), the teaching of creative writing and the processes of editing and revision.

You will be assessed on two portfolios of creative writing and two essays or projects. There are no formal examinations.

Distinctive features:

• Dedicated teaching staff of professional writers;

• Opportunities for hands-on experience in teaching Creative Writing;

• Workshops and readings by eminent authors, along with Open Mic nights at a city centre venue, enabling you to share your writing with an audience to enhance your skills and confidence in public presentations;

• Small Group workshops;

• You will have the opportunity to attend a residential writing retreat at Gregynog Hall, a country mansion with a distinguished artistic heritage in mid-Wales.

Structure

The degree programme consists of four modules which are assessed at separate stages of the academic year. Overall, the degree is worth 180 credits. This is split by a portfolio of writing (60 credits), two essays (60 credits) and a second portfolio (60 credits).

From May to September, you will devote your time to completing your second portfolio of writing, produced exclusively during the course.

You must successfully complete the second portfolio to gain your Master’s degree.

Throughout both semesters you will attend a writer’s workshop, which leads to the first portfolio of written work (approximately 6,000 words, with a critical commentary of 1,000 words). One-to-one sessions with portfolio tutors also run in your second semester.

The Creative Process module gives you the chance to sit in on undergraduate classes and to teach a session and to visit local schools and colleges. Part one will be complete when you successfully pass an essay on teaching creative writing.

Core modules:

Creative Writing Portfolio I: The Writers' Workshop
The Creative Process
Teaching Creative Writing
Creative Writing Portfolio II

Teaching

Teaching is by a combination of small-group seminars, workshops, tutor led one-to-ones, placements in undergraduate classes and visits to outside schools and colleges anda three-day residential at Gregynog Hall.

You will be expected to read and analyse a range of critical and literary texts, read and assess peer work and develop self-reflective skills.

The learning activities will vary from module to module, but may include writing exercises, critical reading, analysis of craft, the presentation of critical and creative work to others, micro-teaching, etc. You are expected to give focused and constructive feedback in our supportive group workshops.

Assessment

You will be assessed through submission of two portfolios and two essays over the course of your degree.

The second portfolio, completed between May-September in your second semester, must be successfully completed and passed for you to gain your Master’s degree.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much enhanced career prospects. Example employers in the UK include Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Poetry Wales Magazine, Teach First, and the Welsh Government, with jobs that include Creative Writing Lecturer, Librarian, Poet, Recruitment Consultant, Teacher, and Writer.

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The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Read more
The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Audiences are transforming into media producers; new business models are emerging; social media campaigns create new forms of politics; digital culture highlights practices of sharing and participation; and data collection and analytics affect an increasing part of our lives.

This offers new possibilities for digital citizens, but it also raises new questions regarding classic notions of privacy and freedom of expression, and it renders information and digital infrastructure a key resource.

The MA Digital Media and Society addresses current challenges of online communication and internet studies. It enables you to develop specialist knowledge in areas such as social media, big data, citizen journalism, digital culture, the creative industries, internet governance, and digital rights. It also provides a theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

This course provides you with a thorough understanding of the current transformations and with the analytical skills to investigate digital media in the context of social, political and economic change. We ask how online communication is shaped by users, states and businesses, and how our society is, in turn, affected by digital media.

This course draws on the strength and diversity of Cardiff University’s staff, giving you a unique opportunity to work with academics whose research explores issues such as citizen journalism, online activism, big data, internet surveillance, internet governance and digital rights.

You can get involved in our Research Group Digital Media and Society and thus become part of a dynamic research environment.

Please note this course focuses on academic research and does not provide extensive practical training.

Distinctive features

• Enables you to develop an in-depth understanding of digital media and their implications for the social, political, economic and cultural environment.

• Conveys specialist knowledge that addresses current areas of concern, such as social media use, big data, the sharing economy, privacy and surveillance, internet governance, digital rights, and citizen journalism.

• Empowers you to assess how technological change is linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, and historical developments, and how it affects democracy and social change.

• Equips you with a thorough theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

• Allows you to apply up-to-date research skills to carry out your own original research for the dissertation and beyond.

• Produces reflective and well-trained graduates who understand the multiplicity of social, cultural, political and technological complexities of digital media and who will be able to solve complex problems and make informed decisions in their future careers.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time course, combining core and optional modules. Over the course duration you will study modules totalling 180 credits.

Core modules:

Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Understanding Digital Media
Citizen Journalism and Digital Publics
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and seminars, which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career prospects

Graduates of MA Digital Media and Society are employed in a range of occupations, including the non-profit sector, digital business, online journalism, and regulatory institutions. They take on leading roles in social media campaigns, internet policy, human rights organisations, journalism, and creative industries.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares you for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources. Read more
Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources.

Studying in a modern Celtic capital with experts from Archaeology, English, History and Welsh, you are additionally well-placed to access key specialist collections and western Britain’s major Celtic sites.

You will be able to critically assess the work of others and of your own, to engage effectively in debate at an advanced level, to plan, design and carry out a coherent research strategy, and to produce detailed and coherent reports and presentations.

The wide-range of non-transferable skills acquired are a particular strength for the pursuit of careers outside of archaeology and the heritage sector.

You will develop a critical understanding of people to whom the term Celtic has been applied, from the earliest European evidence through to the historical and literary evidence of early medieval Britain.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the Celtic world.
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches.
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches.
• Expert supervision of dissertation topics.
• You may have the opportunity to build on your existing skill-set through participation in projects and excavations.
• Specialist library facilities.
• Cardiff's location in western Britain makes it geographically central to much of the material under discussion.

Structure

You take a total of 180 credits of modules over one year (full-time) or three years (part-time) consisting of:

• core skill modules (40 credits)
• your choice of option modules (80 credits)
• dissertation (60 credits)

Following successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation (60 credits).

For this element of the programme you research and write your 20,000 words on a subject of your choice, approved in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Pwnc Arbennig 1 / Special Subject 1
Pwnc Arbennig 2 / Special Subject 2
Special Period/ Topic Study 1
Special Period/ Topic Study 2
Later Prehistory of Britain
Post-Roman Britain and Ireland
The Early Celts
Celtic Mythology and Religion

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures and tutorials (depending on modules chosen).

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Teaching is through the medium of English though there are many opportunities to learn Welsh.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and coursework. As part of the programme, you will deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have embarked on careers in a range of professions from academia, the heritage sector, journalism and law to media research (media, commercial, academic), teaching and publishing. A significant number choose to continue studies at PhD level.

Recent graduate destinations include CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government and a range of universities in the UK and overseas.

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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
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Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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Our one year full-time or two year part-time Ethics and Social Philosophy Master’s emphasises the enhancement of skills relevant to advanced philosophical research. Read more
Our one year full-time or two year part-time Ethics and Social Philosophy Master’s emphasises the enhancement of skills relevant to advanced philosophical research.

The programme offers knowledge and expertise for further research, postgraduate vocational training, or entry on to a variety of professional career paths.

Distinctive features:

• Suitable either as preparation for further research in ethics and social philosophy or as a stand-alone postgraduate qualification.
• Teaching is by seminars and discussion.
• Specialist courses and dissertation supervision.
• Extensive library holdings of books, journals and electronic sources.
• Regular research seminars with visiting speakers and additional postgraduate research seminars.

Structure

You will take two modules per semester or one module per semester for part-time study. Each module is assessed by 4,000 word essay, with feedback supplied on a first draft of 3,000 words.

Following successful completion of the taught element, you will progress to research and submit a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choice (subject to approval by the Board of Studies).

Core modules:

Philosophy MA Dissertation

Optional modules:

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Philosophy of Feminism
Agency and Responsibility
Social and Political Philosophy
Rationality and Normativity
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

The modules available on the MA in Ethics and Social Philosophy offer you the opportunity to explore in depth a number of Philosophical issues and critical ideas while gaining experience in research methodology.

All of the MA modules are taught in a weekly seminar for 10 weeks. The sessions include presentation of material by the module tutor, student presentations and class discussion.

The teaching programme for each module will be issued or finalised at the very beginning of each semester; this will detail required readings to ensure that you have the necessary background preparation.

Each module is taught for two hours a week by seminar. It is essential that you prepare for each seminar by reading the set texts and undertaking supplementary research. You will received individual guidance on the development of a range of skills.

Assessment

Each of the four modules you study as part of the degree is assessed by an essay of 4,000 words, submitted for summative examination at the end of the course.

Each summative essay may be a revised version of a formative essay of 3,000 words submitted to the module leader on an agreed topic.

You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice approved by the Philosophy Board of Studies (15,000 – 20,000 words). You can access up to five one-hour supervisory sessions with your allocated supervisor.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study in the School is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much-enhanced career prospects.

Example employers in the UK include Researchers with Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Research Analyst, Marie Curie Trust, Teach First, and Researchers in the Welsh Government, with jobs that include Crime Intelligence Analyst, Lecturer, Librarian, Recruitment Consultant and Teacher.

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Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. Read more
Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. You will learn to critically evaluate expert testimony on forensic matters and to consider the role of expertise in legal systems more generally.

You will receive a grounding in research methods and issues and debates in forensic linguistics. You will acquire tools for evaluating and examining a range of legal language in relation to issues such as power and comprehensibility. You will also develop skills in research and writing at higher degree level and learn to engage with the legal system as a site of social life where important decisions are made through language.

On successful completion of the programme you will have achieved the following outcomes:

• the application of descriptive data analysis skills in a wide range of spoken and written discourse contexts within the legal process, including emergency calls, police interviews, courtroom interaction, judicial judgments;

• a critical understanding of investigative data analysis skills in both spoken and written discourse contexts, including such areas as disputed authorship and plagiarism detection;

• critical understanding of the work of linguists as advisers and activists on legal systems and settings.

Structure

Students can complete either a PGDip or an MA in Forensic Linguistics. Both courses can be completed in year by full-time study or 2 years by part-time study.

• PGDip core modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Forensic Linguistics II
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Project in Forensic Linguistics

• PGDip optional modules:

Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Phonology
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same modules as PGDip PLUS dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words.

• MSc optional modules:

Same modules as PGDip

Teaching

Core knowledge and understanding is delivered via lectures and small-group seminars.

The teaching for core modules combines discussion of theoretical issues and practical challenges raised by the forensic setting, while the teaching for optional modules provides further theoretical discussion with some focus on the development of practical research skills. Sessions rely on your good preparation.

Core knowledge and understanding are also delivered via one-to-one or very small group supervision of individual projects. Intellectual Skills are promoted via lectures, seminars and group discussions, as well as small-group supervision and guidance for research undertaken in a small, team research project.

The learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

The programme will be assessed by such means as essays, data analyses, critical reviews, posters and oral presentation. Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly work presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

Formative work is offered for one of the modules, in which you may undertake forms of assessment that may be new to you. Other modules offer a series of assignments with the express intention that you might learn cumulatively. Elsewhere, you are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader on the main ideas and plans for your assignments.

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest or experience.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to further study (e.g. a PhD or law degree) or have pursued careers in a number of relevant areas such as policing, the courts and Government as well as careers in areas without a forensic connection.

Employers for graduates from this programme include: local government departments, police forces, secondary schools, language schools, universities, banks, solicitors and utility companies.

Career destinations include: crime intelligence analyst, crime analyst, specialist police interviewer, emergency call handler, lawyer, lecturer, teacher, programme administrator, research assistant, PR executive, marketing executive and writer.

Graduates from this programme also move on to non-legal careers and find that the legal and linguistic focus of their studies provides their employers with something a little unusual. Graduates in the job market have also benefited from the training in processing and using information thoughtfully, writing effectively and speaking convincingly which is essential to good postgraduate study.

Placements

We encourage students to make contact with local organisations in order to explore the opportunity of short placements. We provide work experience through the project module where you will work on an authentic research project.

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In this interdisciplinary course, you will explore the history and archaeology of the Greek and Roman World. It is designed to develop your skills in interpreting literary, artistic and archaeological evidence from the ancient world, building on your first degree in Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology. Read more
In this interdisciplinary course, you will explore the history and archaeology of the Greek and Roman World.

It is designed to develop your skills in interpreting literary, artistic and archaeological evidence from the ancient world, building on your first degree in Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology.

The course, which consists of taught modules and individual research, is designed to be flexible, enabling you to pursue your own interests whilst gaining a solid foundation of research skills. It can serve as a basis for doctoral research, but it also provides transferable skills, which will be valuable for a career in any field.

Distinctive features:

• Strong interdisciplinary ethic
• Training in research methods and skills, including writing and public speaking.
• The course allows you to pursue your special interests.
• The possibility of a residential course at the British School in Athens or the British School in Rome (subject to admission by the appropriate British School).

Structure

The course can be completed in one year by full-time study or over three years by part-time study.

You will take a mix of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits over two semesters. These include:

• core skills modules (40 credits)
• language modules (20 credits)
• your choice of option modules (60 credits)

Following successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to the dissertation, for which you will research and write 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Themes in Classical Archaeology
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes (depending on modules chosen).

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

Career prospects

Our graduates typically find employment with organisations such as: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Element Productions, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government, national and international universities.

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History at Cardiff offers a stimulating learning environment in which to expand your field of interest. Read more
History at Cardiff offers a stimulating learning environment in which to expand your field of interest.

As a postgraduate History student you will be able to develop a sophisticated understanding of themes or topics you find truly fascinating, in a flexible programme offering a broad chronological, geographical and thematic range.

You will gain a thorough grounding in research and historical theory, with a choice of modules spanning the medieval to the modern period.

Distinctive features

• Flexible, geared to students’ interests.

• Opportunity to work closely with a research mentor on specialist options.

• Draws on a stimulating and supportive learning environment, with a wide range of chronological, geographical and thematic expertise.

• Close links with interdisciplinary research groups, including the Centre for the Study of Medieval Society and Culture, the Centre for the Crusades, the Centre for Welsh American Studies, the Collaborative Interdisciplinary Study of Science, Medicine and the Imagination, and the Families, Identities and Gender Research Network.

Structure

The course can be completed in 1 year by full-time study or in 3 years by part-time study.

You will take modules totalling 180 credits. This includes:

• 20 credits of research skills and methods;
• 60 credits of historical theory and advanced research skills;
• 40 credits of optional modules;
• 60-credit dissertation (topic or theme chosen by the student in consultation with academic staff).

You will progress to the dissertation on successful completion of the taught stage.

Core modules:

Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation (History)

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes (depending on modules chosen).

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme, you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have gone on to PhD programmes or into careers in the heritage sector, journalism, teaching, media research (media, commercial, academic), and publishing.

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The MA International Journalism aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a career in the international media or in related fields. Read more
The MA International Journalism aims to offer knowledge and expertise for a career in the international media or in related fields.

The course offers the opportunity to gain a perspective on 21st century journalism in different media and in different countries. It offers a mix of practice and theory – blending journalistic techniques and advanced academic study.

The programme offers practical journalism, but remains an academic Master’s degree.

The practical working environment within the degree aims to deepen professional knowledge and challenge understandings.

You will chose to specialise in broadcast, documentary, or multimedia journalism.

Distinctive features

• The course attracts international applicants wanting to strengthen the journalistic competence in their own countries.

• It provides a richness of exposure (through the multicultural nature of the student body) to comparative international media practices.

• It is aimed at journalists wanting a period of reflection and study about the practice of 21st century journalism.

Structure

The taught component of the course amounts to 120 credits and is taught across two semesters (Autumn and Spring) from the end of September to the beginning of June and combines core and elective modules.

You will submit a dissertation at the end of August. The dissertation carries 60 credits.

Core modules:

Information Gathering and Analysis 1
Information Gathering & Analysis II
International News Production 2
International News Production 1
Foreign News Reporting
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
International Relations for Journalists
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of practical workshops which replicate an industry environment as well as a series of lectures and seminars which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative classroom activities, essays and practical assessments throughout the course.

Assessment

Graduates of the MA International Journalism programme are employed in a wide and varied range of occupations including editorial positions in International Broadcast and Multimedia Journalism industries such as BBC Worldwide, CNN, NDTV, SABC, Russia Today, Al Jazeera, Reuters and Bloomberg. Graduates have also gone on to work in global marketing and publication industries as well as becoming freelance documentary producers and web content developers.

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