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Ravensbourne, Full Time MA Degrees

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Explore skills in creativity, problem-solving, strategic thinking, design research and technology to offer innovative communication solutions. Read more
Explore skills in creativity, problem-solving, strategic thinking, design research and technology to offer innovative communication solutions.

The Ravensbourne MA Communication Design pathway explores skills in creativity and problem-solving using technology to offer innovative communication solutions. Analytical skills, strategic and conceptual thinking are developed to achieve successfully targeted messages to the recipient.

This broad-ranging discipline is concerned not only with developing the message and its aesthetic, but also with creating new media channels to ensure the message reaches its target audience effectively.

The pathway has been developed in response to industry demand for creative professionals with specialist design skills and in-depth understanding of emerging technologies within the digital media and design industries. Communication designers commonly work across a wide range of areas, invariably offering a 360° approach to design delivery that requires collaboration with specialists for aspects of a project.

As technology has become more prevalent, design has assumed more importance and therefore communication designers need to be able to continuously offer new creative ideas to meet client needs.

You will also develop your own specialism, as well as collaborating with students on other postgraduate pathways, through rigorous analysis, experimentation and the practical testing and implementation of ideas.

Ravensbourne is the ideal place for you to develop your own design practice through collaboration and prepare for high level professional practice. You will benefit from the input and insights of professional designers working within the strategic and future-thinking communication design business.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – Within the Technology Issues unit, students will engage with 3 5-week project cycles that will allow them to explore ways of communicating and visualising concepts for data and information through appropriate media channels in order to reach a designated audience. These units are structured to encourage students to engage collaboratively with fellow students.

2. Business and Innovation – Taught during the term prior to the Major Project Unit this unit helps students develop and understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries. It supports communication design students in turning their ideas and skills into viable market propositions and long term business plans.

3. Research Process – This unit provides the grounding for research and development skills needed for students’ individual projects.

4. Concept and Prototyping – allows students to further develop their skills, to identify a specialist area related to communication design and to pursue a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in communication design and research and develop (investigate, challenge and test) the concept.

5. Major project - The Major Project represents the culmination of students’ investigation and the final stage of the research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self-managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice-based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The Ravensbourne MA Environment Design investigates spatial design in its real-virtual, and macro-micro scales. Read more
The Ravensbourne MA Environment Design investigates spatial design in its real-virtual, and macro-micro scales. Encompassing interior, architecture, cities and natural environments the programme analyzes a series of different perspectives of theory and practice from art, science, and technology towards an understanding of a cultural sustainability.

Systems - Every year the course aims to produce new research that takes forward questions inherent in Modernity. Currently focused on natural ecological systems (earthquakes, tectonic plates, deltas and shorelines), (re)contruction and war, cosmographies and cultures of outerspace, and bio-tech materials ; the course encourages you to explore your own field of research and practice.

Technologies - The Environment Design operates with a multidisciplinary team where knowledge exchange is one of the core points to focus. From: applied technologies, visual effects, interactive digital media, moving image, communication design and fashion, the programme aims to deploy students with methods and techniques from different perspectives embracing new possibilities offered by new technology and the creative processes involved in designing.

Modeling and simulation - with a hands on training in the use of the scientific instruments and computational tools, Ravensbourne offers you with full access to digital facilities for digital imaging and prototyping; where you will be able to experiment and innovate through technical, user and interaction workshops based upon strategies deployed by leading practitioners within the field.

You will be encouraged to engage with advanced practice within a global context and explore the similarities and key differences and emphases of different centres across the world and to put your learning and design solutions into context.

Here you will expand your own research and practice, by developing and managing an individual programme of enquiry and creative development in environment design culminating in the realisation of a final major project fully informed by professional and industrial contexts and multi disciplinary perspectives.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

The Research Process unit supports you in gaining the research skills needed for the development of your individual projects.

Three five-week workshops in the Technology Issues unit will enable you to explore interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary and individually negotiated projects.

In the Business Innovation unit, you are helped to develop an understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries.

The Concept and Prototyping unit allows you to further develop the skills you have learnt; for example: using hybrid bottom-up strategies and to take a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in environment design and research and develop the concept.

The Major Project represents the culmination of the your investigation and the final stage of the research strategy.

Learning

You will receive regular support from tutors, peers and subject-specific group tutorials as part of a constant critical dialogue to help create a professional and critical understanding of your individual creative process.

You will benefit from working alongside students on other MA pathways in a multi-disciplinary environment, creating opportunities to widen and expand approaches to your own research and practice giving the opportunity to adapt and adopt new and innovative methods and solutions.

The course benefits from its positioning and relationship to allied creative disciplines, such as the Applied Technologies, Fashion, and Interactive Digital Media pathways, affording opportunities for collaboration, cross-fertilisations and synergies. You are also expected to engage with the architectural design profession and to make full use of the resources and opportunities available in London.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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Ravensbourne’s MA Fashion has innovation at its heart, challenging the boundaries of traditional fashion design, practice and manufacture; and has been developed in response to market forces shaping the fashion industry today, where cutting-edge design practice is balanced with sophisticated commercial strategy. Read more
Ravensbourne’s MA Fashion has innovation at its heart, challenging the boundaries of traditional fashion design, practice and manufacture; and has been developed in response to market forces shaping the fashion industry today, where cutting-edge design practice is balanced with sophisticated commercial strategy.

This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the dynamic between creativity, technology and business awareness. The course develops the critical and creative, and technical and professional skills necessary to advance practice and stimulate innovation in the fashion industry.

As an MA Fashion student, you will explore the boundaries of creative fashion design and develop your digital skills utilising a range of prototyping technologies. The course will challenge you to re-examine the underpinning methodologies and ways of working that characterise creative practice in fashion. You will be encouraged to challenge the boundaries of traditional fashion design, practice and manufacture, and explore the creative opportunities offered by technology and new ways of working.

Innovation often emerges from meaningful collaboration with other disciplines and you will benefit from Ravensbourne’s unique postgraduate ethos where the course is not only positioned within a wide range of creative postgraduate courses but you will collaborate with practitioners in the other disciplines to gain a multi-disciplinary perspective.

The course will equip you with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the international fashion business and marketing, enabling you to apply and integrate this into the creative design and making process.

Throughout the course, you will develop new experimental approaches to fashion and/or textile design, strengthening your own practice and developing new creative, technological and commercial skills.

Course structure

1. Technology issues – Within the technology issues unit students will engage with 3 to 5 week project cycles that will enable them to explore ideas and build on skills in interdisciplinary, cross disciplinary and individually negotiated projects. These units are structured to encourage students to engage collaboratively with fellow students.

2. Business and innovation – Taught during the term before the Final Major Project Unit, this unit helps students develop an understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries. It challenges and supports fashion design students in turning their ideas and skills into viable, innovative market propositions and business plans.

3. Research process – This unit supports students in gaining the research skills needed for the development of students' individual projects. Concept and prototyping – Allows students to further develop their skills, focusing on their chosen specialist area within fashion and pursue a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in fashion and research and develop the concept.

4. Major project – For the Major Project, students will develop and manage an individual programme of enquiry and creative development in fashion culminating in the realisation of a final collection, fully informed by professional and industrial contexts and multi-disciplinary perspectives.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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MA/MSc Interactive Digital Media is a vibrant, interdisciplinary, collaborative and challenging postgraduate pathway focusing on the practical and theoretical study of interactivity in digital media production; and strives to create designers with the potential to innovate and influence interaction design practice who can realise relevant and elegant design proposals with commercial potential. Read more
MA/MSc Interactive Digital Media is a vibrant, interdisciplinary, collaborative and challenging postgraduate pathway focusing on the practical and theoretical study of interactivity in digital media production; and strives to create designers with the potential to innovate and influence interaction design practice who can realise relevant and elegant design proposals with commercial potential.

This MA/MSc Interactive Digital Media is of particular relevance to you as a practitioner or designer who wishes to develop and refine your practice in interaction design, installation, projection mapping, digital games and user-centred product design.

You will be encouraged to work with technology experimentally, creatively and collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technology in new and novel ways through personal fabrication, research and the experimental application. You will also have hands-on experience creating for Android, BlackBerry, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Playstation 3, Xbox, and websites. The course will provide skills in the relevant multimedia software, 3D graphics software, game engines/modelling packages such as Unity, UdK, 3D Studio Max and Maya. You will understand code, create electronic and physical interfaces and the course encourages the use of low level C# and C++, JavaScript, HTML or Python.

We have a dedicated facility for analysing and evaluating console games, containing PS3, XBox 360, and Wii consoles, new games titles and 3D LCD screens.

The course focuses on interaction design and its application to objects, spaces and communication. The emphasis is on technology-mediated communication between humans and objects or spaces, both real and virtual. You will be able to experiment and innovate along side exploring how theory underpins multimedia practice allowing you to ultimately challenge and test theories of interactivity. Interaction can take many forms and you will be encouraged to use a range of tools and approaches, and because of the developing nature of the discipline, you will be experimenting with the latest forms of technology.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Business and Innovation unit you will gain an overview of the industry and new approaches to innovation.

Through the Technology Issues unit, you will explore the potential of digital technology and its application in new services or products or to enhance the functions, usability and aesthetics of existing ones through both group and cross-disciplinary work.

In the Research Process unit you will explore and challenge contemporary themes through theory and practice. There is a strong engagement with game theories (how games are made and what makes a good game), play, multimodality, artificial intelligence, and transmedia storytelling, user experience and computational design.

The Concept and Prototyping unit allows you to conduct a more involved 15-week project to develop and build a prototype, test an emerging technology or generate a concept.

Hypotheses, concepts or project ideas emerging from previous units will provide starting points for the Major Project, which is the final culmination of your investigations and is a substantial piece of self-managed work that embodies the integration of theory and practice, is underpinned by advanced practice-based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. Read more
This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. As an advanced product designer, this course supports your continued development and will refine your practice in interaction and user-centred product design.

The course explores academic theories as well as industry practice within interactive media, digital arts, entertainment and product design; and is a combination of two separate fields: product design and interactive media.

In Interactive Product Futures you will focus on user-centred design processes and research and analyse “user interaction” as your primary focus. The emphasis is on technology-mediated communication between humans and objects or spaces, allowing you to apply design and apply technological solutions to people’s infinite needs. You will also examine how technology gives personality to objects, and thereby how to ensure technology and design are more empathetic to people and their behaviours.

In the early units of the course you will be given short project briefs in which to design, implement, test and evaluate solutions in the form of an interactive product. Each project brief may take the form of an online or offline product; for example: an online quiz, an e-commerce type application, a toy. This is also an opportunity to produce a series of creative works within the specialisation of rapid prototyping (3D printing), animation, game design, web design, installation art, projection mapping, creative coding, computation design and entertainment media. The aim is to provide you with the opportunity to develop a software solution to a given problem, or aspect of a larger problem.

You will be encouraged to experiment with new ways of working with objects/scenarios and their integration with technology both creatively and collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technological solutions through personal fabrication, research and the experimental application of technology.

The course promotes cross disciplinary thinking as an approach to product design, so that the relationship between interactivity, artefacts, environments and the systems and organisations in which they operate can be re-examined.

By studying the course you will develop your creative design skills to innovate and influence product and interaction design practice and realise the commercial potential of your design proposals.

- Collaborative project
'The Digital Gym' project, which allowed students to research how emerging technologies are applied and user behaviour enhanced to provide a distinct, immersive gym experience on the Greenwich Peninsula.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Through the Business and Innovation unit you will have the opportunity to explore the generation of innovative new business models that will help to shape your emerging project concept.

The Technology Issues unit encourages you to engage and explore emerging new technologies as well as skills in scripting and coding, first within a group, then as a cross-disciplinary, and finally in an individual project.

Through the Research Process unit, you will explore academic theoretical frameworks and research methodologies and their application within industry practice.

In both the Technology Issues and Concept and Prototyping units, youwill explore the dialogue between product and user, the function, usability and forms, flow and creativity and user experiences.

The course will culminate in your final Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. Read more
MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. The project work undertaken is underpinned with research, analysis and evidence of strategic thinking as well as self reflection.

On this course you will be able to devise new means of attracting audiences, whether in the areas of promotion and advertising or within the exhibition and corporate sector, moving image for mobile devices, the web, and in every area of motion design and the world of moving image.

The course has been designed for those looking for innovative, creative and critical learning, as you will engage with video, environmental, digital editing, sound and animation to develop your creative ideas and build a strong conceptual and technical basis for your development.

As well as providing opportunities to engage with more traditional areas of moving image such as short narrative film, promotions and branding, animation, motion graphics and broadcast design, the pathway also covers areas such as 3D projection and video mapping and CGI.

You will be expected to respond to new ideas, where the screen is not confined to the movie theatre or the living room. You will be encouraged to extend your knowledge of creative, interpretative and critical approaches to moving image practices. MA Moving Image provides an intensive arena for the discussion, development and production of high quality original audio-visual work. You will also be encouraged to engage with the wider context of moving image practice, for instance through submitting work to festivals and competitions.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Technology Issues unit, and Concept and Prototyping unit, you will have the opportunity to engage with industry standard software (for example: After Effects, Cinema 4D, Final Cut Pro, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop).

Supported in particular by the Research Process and Technology Issues units, the pathway will enable you to deepen your conceptual thinking and technical application through the development of your individual practice.

New technologies have transformed the relationships between traditional film, video and digital formats, offering new opportunities for experimentation and the business context of this is explored through the Business and Innovation unit.

In the Concept and Prototyping unit you will develop your main concepts with reference to theoretical and business contexts; and this work will culminate in the Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The Master of Design in Social Innovation applies the lens of design thinking to address some of society’s most intractable social, environmental and economic challenges. Read more
The Master of Design in Social Innovation applies the lens of design thinking to address some of society’s most intractable social, environmental and economic challenges.

In the face of the promise of untold growth we are now confronted by a harsh reality: that in the second decade of the 21st century the traditional model of ‘business as usual’ is no longer viable. In applying a range of approaches to designing and prototyping social ventures and models of organisation, the MDes in Social Innovation will equip you with a practice-based approach to embedding innovation in the area of sustainability, community resilience, corporate social responsibility, venture philanthropy and organisational agility. Working with a cross- disciplinary team of professionals, the course will allow you to learn about radical ideas, evolve these ideas and test them in a ‘lived’ organisational environment.

The MDes Social Innovation will demonstrate that many of the most successful designs, innovations and innovators have learned to operate across the boundaries between disciplines, sectors, organisations and traditional services.

The course will develop your ideas and skills in people-centred and organisational leadership as a way of transforming the way that public, private and not-for-profit services are shaped using design thinking methodologies.

At its heart lie three design principles:

1. an holistic approach - the need to approach innovation from a ‘holistic’ point of view, drawing on its potential impact in terms of people, technology, the environment, psychological and emotional meaning and long-term sustainability

2. a core intent - the potential to develop a ‘core intent’
and value proposition to organisational models to stimulate commercial and brand value through interaction, social value, collaboration and ideas generation

3. participatory and inclusive - the importance of developing social and environmental solutions ‘with’ and ‘by’ key stakeholders, customers/markets etc. and not simply ‘to’ and ‘for’ people.

Course aims

- To understand the role of social innovation as a business discipline balancing both leadership roles in terms of innovation, the creation of vision and future directions and management roles in terms of using specific tools, methods and techniques.
- To approach leadership, organisational and enterprise development from the perspective of design thinking and creative innovation.

Study units

- Stage One
Developing a knowledge base and new reference points - introduces you to a range of theories and practices in the strategic use of design and innovation, with a particular focus on the method of design thinking in the global context and how it relates to social and environmental change and sustainability.

- Stage Two
Putting new learning into a professional context – develops the practical application of design thinking with a focus on innovation and industry-oriented professional practice based on design management. It also extends your innovation and leadership toolkit. The Studio Practice unit gives you the opportunity to take on a work placement or design research project which will inform your major project.

• Unit 4 Professional Practice in Management and Consulting • Unit 5 Strategic Design and Innovation
• Unit 6 Studio Practice

- Stage Three
Evaluating and advancing existing knowledge

• Unit 7 Major Project

Programme Aims for the Master of Design

The Master of Design programme aims to provide the opportunity for you to develop creative thinking and innovative strategies through an advanced understanding of the practical application of design thinking and design strategy to management and organisational leadership, in order to equip you with the knowledge and skills to apply your learning in a global context. In particular, this programme aims:

- To equip you with an advanced knowledge and understanding of the contextual background to, and developments in design thinking and to reflect on that learning in order to advance your own practice and subject area and to innovate.

- To develop effective managers and leaders with effective design management skills who through creativity and global awareness are able to influence and create positive change in their organisations whether at an operational or a strategic level.

- To equip you with independent study skills that support research, practice and professional development and allow you to continue developing as life-long learners throughout their professional lives maintaining contact with emerging practice from a variety of fields.

- To provide a stimulating environment, which is supportive, flexible and collaborative and allows you to develop your potential.

- To develop a high level of professionalism and confidence to initiate and lead complex design projects involving diverse disciplines and business functions.

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The landscape of visual effects is changing at a lightning speed. Read more
The landscape of visual effects is changing at a lightning speed. The technological advances over the last decade have brought us fast communication links that are enabling global, cloud-based and remote workflow, opening the possibilities of a looser, more flexible network of artists based in different countries creatively collaborating on visual effects projects. This, combined with the ever increasing demand for both film and video content means that there is a growing need not just for VFX artists but also VFX producers, post-production coordinators and project managers that have a deep understanding of the whole workflow in the creation of visual effects and the post-production in general.

Ravensbourne’s course reflects these changes and follows Skillset guidance on the entry skills required to meet VFX industry’s needs that encompass not only specialised industry skills but also soft skills required for a successful career in the VFX and post-production industry be it in the creative or project management spectrum.

In addition six modules in the form of group tutorials are given on the whole process in the creation of VFX including pre-production meetings, VFX acquisition, scheduling, budgeting, organisation and shoot supervision. These modules also place VFX in the wider context of post-production and give an overview of the post-production workflow from brief to delivery that includes transcoding, editing and deliverables.

Ravensbourne gives students access to all the necessary equipment, including cameras, the use of green screen studios with complete lighting rigs and the relevant software.

Students will have the opportunity to visit a major post-production facility through Ravensbourne’s many industry partnerships. Entrants are likely to have previously studied arts, media, public relations, marketing, editing, post-production, motion graphics or 3D animation at undergraduate level.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – Within the Technology Issues unit, students will engage with 3 5-week project cycles that will allow them to explore CG, compositing and finishing. These units are structured to encourage students to engage collaboratively with fellow students.

2. Business and Innovation – Taught during the term prior to the Major Project Unit this unit helps students develop and understanding of business and innovative practices in the creative industries. It supports visual effects students in turning their ideas and skills into viable market propositions and long term business plans.

3. Research Process – This unit provides the grounding for research and development skills needed for students’ individual projects.

4. Concept and Prototyping – allows students to further develop their skills, to identify a specialist area related to visual effects and to pursue a single line of inquiry, idea or theory embedded in visual effects and research and develop (investigate, challenge and test) the concept.

5. Major project - The Major Project represents the culmination of students’ investigation and the final stage of the research strategy. This is a substantial piece of self-managed work that is underpinned by advanced practice-based methodologies and processes.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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