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SOAS University of London, Full Time MA Degrees

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The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

In the two-year pathway, students can take intensive Arabic language with either MA Islamic Societies and Cultures, MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies, or MA Palestine Studies, therefore making these programmes unique in Europe. The student will be provided with a near proficient ability in the Arabic language.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-arabic/

May be combined with

- MA Islamic Societies and Cultures
- MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies
- MA Palestine Studies
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

In the two-year language pathway, students take two units of Arabic and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school in Jordan. Upon their return, they will take one unit of Arabic in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

For the part-time four year pathway, please refer to the programme specification (attached below) of your preferred discipline.

The intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the partner university but will be counted as one unit.

- Intermediate Arabic/English Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC418 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Higher Intermediate Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC419 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Advanced Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC420 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Intensive Advanced Summer Arabic (PG) - 15PNMC416 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Teaching & Learning

Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website. In general, by the end of the course students will have learnt the following:

Knowledge:

- How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research-sources (particularly research-library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.
- Subject-specific skills are an amalgam of the skills described for each of the three options chosen by candidates from the cross-department/faculty choices available in the relevant course-descriptors.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and should also come to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.
- Students will learn to question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves.
- Communicate effectively in writing subject-based practical skills.
- Language-students will learn the chosen language at the appropriate level.
- Present seminar-papers.
- Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
- Practise research-techniques in a variety of specialised research-libraries and institutes.

Transferable skills:

- Writing good essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing.
- Study a variety of written and digital materials in libraries and research-institutes of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.
- Present (non-assessed) material orally.
- To acquire/develop skills in Arabic language to Effective Operational Proficiency level.
- To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Arabic and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.
- Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Arabic.
- Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese.

Your chosen discipline is combined with intensive Japanese language over two years (including a period in Japan), making this programme unique in Europe.

Access to the Japanese language pathway is currently available for students with

a) beginner, or

b) post-beginner level of proficiency.

As a point of reference for b), this would correspond to having completed Minna no Nihongo, Volumes 1 and 2 (or an equivalent text), knowledge of approximately 500 kanji, and tuition time of about 220 hours in total. The list of kanji is available here, and a sample test is available here.

Students’ proficiency levels will be assessed through a placement test during registration week (specific dates will be provided to the applicants).

Students bear the costs of travel to and from Japan, as well as living expenses during the period of their stay.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

May be combined with

- MA Japanese Studies
- MA Korean Studies
- MA Historical Research Methods
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies
- MA Linguistics and Language

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, in the second year, they take one intensive language unit and two discipline units. They also choose a dissertation topic within their Major.
Students must pass all of the language units in order to qualify for the degree with Intensive Japanese.

In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment of the summer school element is conducted upon return to SOAS.

Programme Specification Intensive Japanese (pdf; 177kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/file101340.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website.

Knowledge
- Students will acquire a comprehensive understanding of Japan’s past and present, within the parameters of the courses and disciplines chosen.
- Students will acquire an advanced understanding of the theoretical and methodological tools of the relevant disciplines.
- Students will improve their knowledge of and ability to use Japanese in their everyday life and professional career.

Intellectual (thinking) skills
- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically from a variety of sources and how to resolve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.
- Students will learn to evaluate the strengths of particular disciplinary and theoretical approaches, cultivating their ability to draw on a variety of such approaches.
- Students will learn how to design and manage an independent research project, formulating the problem to be addressed, identifying the data to be analyzed, and synthesizing the findings to present well-supported conclusions.

Subject-based practical skills
- Students will learn how to read critically, to participate effectively in seminar discussions, and to present their work in both oral and written form.
- More specific skills will depend on the particular courses taken.
- Students will acquire/develop linguistic skills which will enable them to tackle written and spoken tasks in contexts relevant to them.

Transferable skills
- Students will learn how to access and evaluate electronic and other data effectively and efficiently.
- Students will learn how to solve complex problems, for example concerning economic development, historical causation, literary interpretation, or political decision-making.
- Students will learn how to communicate effectively in a variety of settings and formats.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Also, professionals wishing to pursue careers directly related to Korea, including government departments (of both the UK and other countries), and in firms requiring particular skills and knowledge related to trading, investment and promotional interests outside Europe.

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Korea in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a high level of Korean language proficiency.

This two-year programme (or four years part-time) will provide students with the opportunity to combine Masters’ level training with intensive Korean language study in order to acquire the skills necessary for future professional or research careers. The programme will enable students to engage with the subjects of their Masters’ programme in the context of Korea through Korean, to engage with primary Korean sources and data and to conduct research and professional work in Korea.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/

May be combined with

- MA Korean Studies
- MA Japanese Studies
- MA Historical Research Methods
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

Students will take 4 course units of language over the two-year period, alongside the 3 units plus 1 unit of dissertation of their concurrent Masters programme. (Or the programme can be taken part-time over four years.) Progression can only be made if all language units are passed. If language units are failed, students are recommended to pursue the discipline only pathway.

In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the Korean partner university but will be counted as one unit.

MA ... and Intensive Language (Korean) (pdf; 148kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/file93939.pdf)

Knowledge

To acquire/develop skills in Korean language to higher intermediate level.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Korean and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.

Subject-based practical skills

Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Korean.

Transferable skills

Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, including a team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts. In addition, students take a text-reading seminar, allowing them to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies, or an approved language-based course. Further courses can be selected from available disciplines including Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. Applicants should have at least intermediate-level proficiency in modern Chinese (HSK Level 4). The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students’ existing language skills. Alternative elements are available for applicants not in need of further Chinese language training, such as native speakers of Chinese.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/ma-advanced-chinese-studies/

Structure

In the first year at SOAS students on the programme take the team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 and two taught courses (2 Units) from the list given below. In addition, students take a Reading Seminar in Chinese Studies - 15PCIC003 (1 Unit) or an approved language-based course (1 Unit).

In their second year, students will undertake a Period of Postgraduate Study in China (15PCIC004) at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London (Extended Dissertation in Chinese Studies 15PCIC999).

These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

MA Advanced Chinese Studies - Programme Specification 2014/15 (pdf; 207kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/courses/file93666.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Lectures and Seminars
Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

Dissertation
A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from China, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. Read more
The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. The module ‘Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature’ provides theoretical and methodological skills while the programme’s other units focus on specific areas such as literatures in African languages and contemporary African literature in English.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/

Structure

All students are required to write a 10,000-word dissertation in the field of their major course, which allows them to carry out a substantial piece of independent academic work on a selected topic. The dissertation is taken in either the core module or in the module ‘Selected Topics’.

Students must take the core module plus two modules from list A or B. List B modules assume a linguistic competence in the chosen language equivalent to that acquired in a first degree.

Not all modules listed below may be offered every year, and new modules may become available. For an up-to-date list of modules on offer, please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Some modules may be taught in other departments of the School.

- Core Module
Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year

- List A: Pan-African Modules
Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017

- List B: Language-specific Modules
Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 26kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/file80692.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse
range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the
problems that contemporary societies now face. The MA African Literature can lead to further study and research, however there is also a range of opportunities in fields such as:

- Education
- Publishing
- Archive work
- Arts Management
- Media

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. Read more
The MA in African Studies provides an unrivalled programme of advanced modules on Africa; one of the world’s most fascinating and challenging regions. The opportunity for interdisciplinary study of the continent is a particular advantage of the degree. Students can choose from a range of about 30 modules in fourteen disciplines. Our former students have chosen to study Africa at this level for a wide range of reasons. For some a deep interest in the history and culture or political economy of a particular region is sufficient motivation, but for many students the programme has, in addition, been followed with the intention of furthering their career opportunities. Some go on to work either in Africa or in fields related to Africa. The opportunity to combine study of particular African subjects with an African language is very useful, although some evidence of competence in learning a foreign language is usually required.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/

Structure

Students take three taught module units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three module units from more than one subject. One module unit may be made up of two 0.5 unit modules. The subjects of the programme are: Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Media, Politics, Religious Studies, and Language.

The two minor module units can be taken in the same subject (but different to that of the major), or two different ones.

A language module can only be taken as a minor, and only one language module can be taken.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of term to determine which is the most appropriate level of study.

When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major and minor subjects, and asked to give alternative choices as practical considerations such as time tabling and availability of modules may limit freedom of choice.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc.

All modules are subject to availability.

MA African Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 31kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maafstudies/file80693.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Teaching is normally provided by lecture or seminar and students are required to attend such classes. Each student will be assigned a supervisor in connection with his or her dissertation.

- Lectures and Seminars
Most modules involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation
The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African studies from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Some MA African Studies graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include: Academia; Charity; Community; Government; NGOs; Media; Publishing and UN Agencies.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:
BBC News
British Embassy
Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa
Goal Nigeria
Government of Canada
Hogan Lovells International LLP
International Institute for Environment and Development
Kenyan Government
Mercy Corps
Migrant Resource Centre
Mo Ibrahim Foundation
The London MENA Film Festival
The University of Tokyo
The World Bank
Think Africa Press
U.S. Embassy
United Nations
University of Namibia
World Vision UK
Zanabazar Museum of Fine Arts

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:
Development Producer
Africa Editor
Copywriter
Director of Trade and Investment
Projects and Fundraising Manager
Head of Desk, Africa
Senior Investment Manager
Sports Writer
Knowledge Management Projects Coordinator
Project Director
Presidential Advisor
Commodity Manager
Publisher
Tutor
Creative Consultant
Lecturer in African Arts and Cultures
East Africa Analyst
Youth Volunteer Advisor
Southern Region Educational Manager
Head Specialists Giving + Insights

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students wishing to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MA Res) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training programme]. In the latter case, the MA Res therefore serves as a shortcut into the PhD. It is designed to train students in research skills, including language training, to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines.

Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The student must successfully complete the following core course:

Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011)
This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration.

A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs.

The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 277kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/file93546.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Read more
Food is a fundamental human necessity, essential to the sustenance of the human body. At the same time, food may be associated with pleasure, passion, even luxury. Food is also essential to the social body. Who eats what, who eats with whom, and whose appetites are satisfied and whose denied, are all profoundly social dynamics through which identities, relationships, and hierarchies are created and reproduced.

The SOAS MA programme in the Anthropology of Food offers students the opportunity to explore historically and culturally variable foodways, from foraging to industrial agriculture, from Europe and North America to Africa, Asia and South America. The programme asks students to trace the passage of food from plant to palate, and to examine who benefits, and who suffers, from contemporary modes of food production, exchange, preparation, and consumption. Students examine food policy at national and international levels, as well as the role played in its formation by the food industry.

Focus is given to the study of famine and the controversial role of food aid in securing food supplies. Debates over the impact of agricultural biotechnology on agrarian livelihoods and knowledge systems, as well as on the natural environment, are assessed. Movements toward organic agriculture, fair trade, and slow food are also analysed.

An anthropological approach to the study of food draws upon and challenges the perspectives of other disciplines, whether agronomy or nutritional science, economics or law, history or literature. Dependent upon individual interests and experiences, graduates of the programme may pursue research degrees in any number of academic disciplines, or find employment in food-related government ministries, international organizations, development agencies, or non-governmental associations, as well as in the fields of public health, education, and media, or in the catering industry.

Click here for a last of past Dissertation Titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/ma-anthropology-of-food-dissertation-titles-2006---present.html)

Click here for Alumni Profiles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/foodstudies/studentprofiles/)

Course teachers Johan Pottier, Harry G. West, and Jakob Klein were awarded the 2009 Excellence in Instruction Award by the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society. West was named joint runner-up for the SOAS Director’s Teaching Prize in 2011-2012. The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Food was named a Finalist in the Best Food Initiative category in the BBC Food & Farming Awards in 2015.

Scholarships:
Applicants for the MA Anthropology of Food may be eligible to apply for Scholarships and Bursaries (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/

Programme Structure Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- The Anthropology of Food - 15PANC013 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Food and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 147kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthoffood/file39766.pdf

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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A wide range of students with different interests and backgrounds come to this programme from world over in order to explore why media matter. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

A wide range of students with different interests and backgrounds come to this programme from world over in order to explore why media matter. They are highly qualified with very diverse international interests. It is particularly suitable for:

- Students with a degree in media or cultural studies
- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of media and cultural studies with special reference to Asia or Africa
- People with professional experience in film, television, journalism, advertising or public relations
- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist media-related topics along with regional or language-based study
- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

Our world is inescapably and continuously transformed through a proliferation of media. The MA in Anthropology of Media at SOAS takes up the challenge of understanding how and why media matter. The programme uniquely combines anthropology, media and cultural studies with specific regional expertise in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It provides students with critical skills, research methods, a wide-ranging understanding of media and the opportunity to pursue original research projects. The MA in Anthropology and Media is the first and still the only programme in Europe that specialises in bringing together contemporary anthropological concerns with media and cultural studies.

The MA in Anthropology of Media is a recent and rapidly growing field within the larger academic discipline of Anthropology. It both incorporates and challenges the well-established anthropological concerns with visual culture and ethnographic film through a more extensive examination of contemporary media practices. Along with the parallel disciplines of media and cultural studies, Anthropology of Media is now widely recognized as playing an increasingly important and critical role in current debates about media. It provides an alternative approach, which puts the emphasis upon studying the multiple relationships between people and media and thus seeks to anthropologise media and cultural studies. More than just focussing on media texts or technology, Anthropology of Media is marked by the centrality of people and how they relate to media.

The SOAS programme in Anthropology of Media is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the study of media in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and their diasporas. We also use the theoretical and methodological contributions of Anthropology to build upon and challenge Euro-American media and cultural studies. The programme stresses ethnographic approaches to media as cultural practices in social and political contexts where people inhabit, create and engage with media worlds.

Special Features

The Department cultivates several specialist strengths which distinguish it from other anthropology departments in the UK. The most obvious of these is that all members of the Department are specialists on Africa and Asia. Particular attention is given to teaching and researching regional ethnographic areas of expertise. All staff members are simultaneously attached as anthropologists to this Department and as regional specialists to their appropriate regional studies centre within the School.

SOAS also offers strong interdisciplinary support for the study of media including the Centre for Media and Film Studies and a highly regarded Department of Music. We have a dedicated multi-media suite, a radio station and satellite access to a wide range of world television. Further, the Library houses a major collection of books and journals on world media as well as extensive audio-visual materials.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthofmedia/

Programme Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words. Some courses may be taught in other departments in the school.

Core Courses:
- Comparative Media Studies - 15 PAN C009 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Media and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 119kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthofmedia/file39767.pdf

Destinations

A Masters in the Anthropology of Media at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will endow students with specialist understanding of producers, audiences, and other cultural and social aspects of mass media. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. Read more
The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. The programme provides an appreciation of the concepts, modes of analysis and theoretical approaches in the area of Language Pedagogy, including second language learning theories and teaching methodologies. Students will also be familiarised with the general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure) and how they are relevant to the study of second language acquisition.

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If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

If you are seeking an advanced level of specialised training that will set you on course for a career related to Arabic language learning or teaching in higher education, research, publishing or consultation, this programme offers a firm grounding in the theory and practice of language learning and teaching, as well as in linguistic research methods.

You will study both the general areas of linguistic inquiry and Arabic linguistics. This programme will also allow you to explore the relationship between linguistics and second language acquisition, and how this relationship supports Arabic language teaching, specifically in higher education.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-arabic-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Core Modules:
You must take all of the core modules listed below including: 15PLCH013: Teaching Communicative Arabic

- Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC015 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Arabic Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIH050 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Dissertation in Applied Linguistics and Language Pedagogy - 15PLIC989 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Compulsory Module
Compulsory module for students with no background of general linguistics.

- Introduction to the Study of Language - 15PLIC008 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Optional Modules
If you are not taking the compulsory module for students with no linguistics background, you must take module/s to the value of 1 unit from the courses below and/or from the list of running Linguistics PG modules.

- Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism - 15PLIH038 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
- Language, Society and Communication (Masters) - 15PLIH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1

The Department

Key Facts
- Long and distinguished tradition in leading in-depth study of African, Asian and Middle Eastern languages and the contexts in which they are used
- Complementary thematic and regional expertise among staff, leading to the potential of original research synergies
- We offer a BA programme with a wide range of joint degrees, five postgraduate taught MAs with several pathways, and the PhD in Linguistics

Linguistics Department in UK top 10 for research of world-leading quality:
18 December 2014: The Department is now in the top ten nationally for its research output of world-leading quality and for the vitality of its research environment. Find out more... (http://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem98001.html)

- Our strengths

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. Read more
This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. The fundamental objective is to make Arabic culture and literature accessible to a wider body of postgraduate students and to provide them with training in the study of literature. Students develop an advanced understanding of Arabic literature and gain detailed knowledge of its past and present. The syllabus combines the literary approaches of comparative literature with in-depth study of Arabic literature. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with, among other things, literary theory, translation techniques, the sociology of literature, the social and political dimensions of modern Arabic literature, and different genres and themes of classical, medieval and modern Arabic literature.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three units from the lists of options below, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Options List:
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Early and Medieval Arabic Linguistic Thought: Scholarship and Literature - 15PNMC410 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
A Modern Arabic Literary Genre: Themes and Techniques - 15PNMC046 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Popular Literature: Themes, Genres & Theory - 15PNMC045 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Classical Arabic Prose Literature and Adab - 15PNMC047 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Arabic Critical Theory and Thought - 15PNMC403 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year

MA Arabic Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 34kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/file80795.pdf

Teaching & Learning

All courses are taught in English, and essays and presentations are also done in English. All courses apart from "Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature" involve reading some original Arabic texts.

Most courses are taught in seminar groups. These demand active participation by students, e.g. by giving presentations and by discussion with other students in the class, in order to develop research potential, original thinking and, by the tutor's direction, structured knowledge of the topic.

Classes are one two-hour session each week; in some cases an additional tutorial hour is added. In addition students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars organised by the AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literature and the London Middle East Institute.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in MA Arabic Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Graduates can use their skills in Arabic and literary study in a variety of occupations, particularly those in which deep knowledge of Arabic intellectual culture and a trained mind are an advantage.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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