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University of Bristol, Full Time MA Degrees

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This exciting Chinese-English Translation MA programme develops an understanding of translation in a global context. You will explore how practical translation is informed by theory, develop your verbal and written communication skills and build your IT literacy to help you produce translation of the highest quality. Read more
This exciting Chinese-English Translation MA programme develops an understanding of translation in a global context. You will explore how practical translation is informed by theory, develop your verbal and written communication skills and build your IT literacy to help you produce translation of the highest quality.

Overseas students will come to the UK not only to learn advanced translation skills from and into Chinese, but also to develop their English language skills and their knowledge of UK culture first-hand. The course is also open to students for whom English is a native language as long as their command of Chinese is at a high level.

The MA in Chinese-English Translation will enable you to develop the skills in translation, interpreting, analytical thinking, research and collaboration that are essential to today's workplace and which will equip you to facilitate communication between cultures.

The School of Modern Languages has an established record in translator training and excellent industry links. Its translation staff include practising professional translators and translation researchers. We are a corporate member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting and an institutional member of the American Translators’ Association (ATA). We are on the ATA’s list of approved providers of translator training.

Programme Structure

Semester One
During the first semester, all students will participate in weekly workshop­-style classes in the Applied Translation unit taught by experienced professional translators. By grappling with a variety of different texts, participating in class discussions and receiving personal feedback from tutors, students will build the key skills necessary to grow and develop their translation ability.

The Theories of Translation unit is a lecture-based course that gives an opportunity for advanced reflection on the modes and purposes of translation within the translator’s social and cultural context, while also equipping students with the theoretical tools and approaches necessary for practical translation and further research.

Units in English for Translators and in Academic English build an awareness of how language works and help to hone English skills for professional purposes. Students whose native language is English may substitute these units for another.

Semester Two
During the second semester, the two main core units for all students are a 15,000 word dissertation and an Introduction to Specialised Translation. The dissertation takes the form of either an extended translation plus commentary, or a research-­based dissertation. The supervision process gives students time to formulate their ideas and plan their approach, as for many this will be the most substantial piece of extended writing they have undertaken.

The Introduction to Specialised Translation unit adopts a similar approach to Applied Translation, but focuses on key specialist areas that are in demand in the translation industry. Specialist topics can vary but may include literary, legal, scientific, medical and translation for technology.

In addition to the two core units above, students are also given the opportunity to select from a variety of optional units.

Careers

The MA in Chinese-­English Translation provides a foundation for students looking to enter or develop their careers in translation project management, freelance translation or as in-­house translators and interpreters in international corporate and government institutions.

The skills developed through this degree are transferable to a variety of related careers, such as international relations, PR, marketing and business. In addition, the research and theoretical components of this programme provide an excellent entry point to the field of Translation Studies for anyone aiming to pursue a PhD in the UK or abroad.

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The MA in Comparative Literatures and Cultures gives you the opportunity to study the encounters and exchanges between literatures and cultures across Europe and beyond. Read more
The MA in Comparative Literatures and Cultures gives you the opportunity to study the encounters and exchanges between literatures and cultures across Europe and beyond. We welcome graduates of all arts and humanities disciplines.

You will become acquainted with the theory and practice of comparative cultural study, and consider how concepts of national cultures cross borders and interact with ideas of the global and transnational. You will gain a thorough grounding in cultural theory, critical reading and research skills, and put this theoretical knowledge into practice by studying topics and themes that span the disciplines, national contexts and time periods taught by experts in the School of Modern Languages.

While knowledge of a foreign language is not a requirement for this programme, you will have the opportunity to learn a language at a variety of levels, from beginner to advanced, and to engage with material in foreign languages throughout the MA. The programme culminates in a dissertation, an extended piece of original academic research.

As a postgraduate, you will be considered a full member of the academic community, with the opportunity to participate in the many research seminars and conferences taking place within the Faculty of Arts.

Programme structure

Core units
-Institutions of Culture
-Cultural Encounters
-Research Skills

Optional units
You will take two additional optional units from the wide range available in the School of Modern Languages, or more broadly across the faculty. Optional units can vary but may include:
-Global Cultures of the Book
-The Cultural Imagination of Gender
-Theories of Visual Culture: Text and Image
-The Rise of the Novel in 19th-century Europe
-Tradition and Experimentation in 20th-century Literature
-Language and Society in Present and Past
-Regional and Minority Languages
-Foreign Language Skills for Graduate Students
-Supervised Individual Study
-Theorising Violence: Colonial Encounters and Anti-colonial Reactions

Following successful completion of the taught part of the programme, you will be required to complete a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Careers

Studying comparative literatures and cultures allows you to develop a range of analytical skills and a multi-cultural and interdisciplinary awareness that will allow you to excel in many different professions. Graduates of this programme will be well prepared for doctoral studies in the humanities and arts, as well as careers in business, publishing, law, the civil service, teaching and journalism.

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This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring. Read more
This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring.

The MA is taught within our high-specification composition and recording studios, which have full-time technical support. Students are actively encouraged to build opportunities and networks, within and beyond the University, for projects in film, animation, documentary and more.

In the first semester, you will study Professional Techniques, an introduction to working and recording in studios, and Media Composition, focusing on TV and documentary work. You will also take one elective unit. In the second semester, the programme moves on to Critical Analysis of Media Music and Film Scoring, with an emphasis on longer-term projects for film and TV work. This work feeds into original collaborations that you may choose to include in your final portfolio.

The vibrant musical life of the Department of Music provides opportunities for student and professional performance, and we are located at the heart of one of the UK’s leading cities for broadcast, commercial and creative screen media.

Programme structure

Core units
-Media Composition
-Professional Techniques
-Critical Analysis of Media Music
-Film Scoring

Optional units
Optional units can vary each year. You will be able to choose two units from a wide spectrum that address further compositional skills - such as orchestration, sound design or pastiche composition - research skills for musicians, writing and directing for film and television, and how film and television programmes work.

Media composition portfolio/dissertation
-Either a substantial portfolio of original music for new collaborative films and/or extracts (music totalling 15-25 minutes).
-Or music to one new collaborative film of 10-12 minutes and a critical dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed film or topic.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in Composition of Music for Film and Television have taken up careers as music composers, recording managers and compositing supervisors within animation studios.

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The MA in English Literature allows you to deepen your passion for literature while developing the rigorous specialist skills essential to postgraduate-level research. Read more
The MA in English Literature allows you to deepen your passion for literature while developing the rigorous specialist skills essential to postgraduate-level research. With the help and support of one of the leading English departments in the country, we aim to provide a stimulating and challenging intellectual experience in a friendly, supportive environment.

The programmes offers three pathways (Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature; Romantic and Victorian Literature; 20th-century and Contemporary Literature) which build on the core research strengths of the department. If you wish to focus on a particular period you may follow a single pathway. Alternatively, if you want to broaden your engagement with English literature, you may choose a combination of pathways and optional units. All students are taught the specialist skills required for postgraduate-level research and the practical skills that academic life demands. Everyone is expected to enter fully into the wider academic community of the department and the University.

Programme structure

First Semester
-Introduction to Literary Research
-One pathway unit

Second Semester
-Two pathway units or one academic conference unit
-Optional unit or third pathway unit or academic conference unit

Dissertation
-Following successful completion of the taught course, you must complete a dissertation of 15,000 words maximum.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in English Literature have been successful in obtaining employment in the media, journalism, publishing, the theatre, arts administration and various kinds of teaching, as well as in industry, commerce, law, computing, accountancy, human resources and social work. Many English MA graduates continue their studies by taking up MPhil/PhD programmes.

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This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. Read more
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. As a student on this innovative programme, you will be taught the skills of film production, working intensively in small groups to explore aesthetic possibilities and gain insights into the craft and industry of screen media. You will also engage with critical perspectives and develop high-level research and analysis skills.

Optional units offer the chance to specialise in different areas of practical film-making and to gain a greater understanding of specific areas around the history and aesthetics of film and television. At the dissertation stage, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in creative industry, to undertake an in-depth study of film and television by means of a traditional dissertation, or to produce a mixed-mode investigation through film practice, either individually or in a team, supervised by one or more academic advisers.

The University of Bristol has more than 40 years of experience in this field and the programme draws on the expertise of world-leading scholars, expert practitioners and industry professionals. The Department of Film and Television hosts a series of research seminars and industry masterclasses that are targeted to enrich your studies. Facilities include a 200-seat cinema, production studio, animation and edit suites, seminar rooms and sound rooms.

Bristol is an excellent city in which to study film and television, with its varied cinema, television and digital media spaces, such as the Arnolfini, BBC Bristol, The Cube and Watershed Media Centre. Bristol's Harbourside is home to an array of film festivals, including the Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, the Slapstick Festival, and the Afrika Eye Festival.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop skills and knowledge cumulatively, while allowing you the opportunity to tailor your learning to your specific areas of interest.

In the first semester, you will be taught skills and techniques of formal analysis and practical film-making, providing the foundation for optional units across the year, such as Writing and Directing, Screen Histories, Television Forms and Making Short Fiction. Other options include Translation for Subtitling (Chinese-English), Screen Style and Aesthetics, and Making Short Fiction.

In the second semester, you will gain knowledge of research methods relevant to the dissertation stage, which includes the opportunity to undertake a placement in the film/TV industry, write an extended essay or produce a piece of practice (normally a short film) accompanied by individual written reflection.

Careers

Graduates of film and television at Bristol have taken up careers as film-makers, programme researchers, senior academics and broadcasting executives.

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The MA in History offers you the opportunity to explore a variety of approaches – intellectual, political, cultural, social and economic – across a broad chronological and geographical range. Read more
The MA in History offers you the opportunity to explore a variety of approaches – intellectual, political, cultural, social and economic – across a broad chronological and geographical range. The programme provides a high degree of choice across the department's key areas of expertise, with particular strengths in:

-Medieval and early modern history
-Contemporary British and European history
-Imperial, global and transnational history
-Public history

Given the range of research and teaching in the department, we are confident you will find units that reflect your own interests. Alternatively, you may prefer not to specialise, and instead obtain a broad sense of historical subjects, themes, debates and methodologies.

Programme structure

The MA comprises six taught units and a research dissertation. Teaching on the programme moves from lectures, through seminars, to one-on-one supervision. Likewise, the focus develops from broader units, through more specialised ones, to your chosen dissertation topic.

Teaching Block 1
You begin with a series of core and optional units. All students take Academic Research and Writing and Approaches to History - core MA units that enable you to develop critical research skills and approaches that underlie the later assessments.

You also choose a further unit from a wide range of Lecture Response Units (interactive units that combine seminar and lecture elements) on subjects that span the period from 1000 to the present. Alternatively, in place of the LRU you may choose the specialist skills unit Research Skills for Medievalists, which provides training in palaeography and manuscript studies.

Teaching Block 2
In the second teaching block, you will select three primary source-based seminar units. The following are examples of units that have run in recent years:

Dissertation
In the third semester, you will write a primary source-based dissertation of up to 15,000 words, supervised one-on-one by an academic in the department. You will identify the subject for your dissertation in the spring, but most of the research is conducted over the summer. The dissertation is submitted in mid-September.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in History have taken up careers as history teachers, researchers in a number of different fields and image and data capture assistants.

A number of MA graduates have gone on to take an MPhil/PhD in History and develop careers as research academics.

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The Department of History of Art offers a broad-based Master's programme, which allows you to study a range of periods and approaches, before specialising for your dissertation. Read more
The Department of History of Art offers a broad-based Master's programme, which allows you to study a range of periods and approaches, before specialising for your dissertation. The MA draws on the research strengths of all members of the department, which includes specialists in medieval, renaissance and modern art.

We aim to help you develop an informed understanding of the main strands of art history, as practised in Europe and North America. We also offer curatorial units in collaboration with external museum partners, through which you will learn to research and catalogue museum collections and to mount exhibitions.

Our students are drawn from a variety of backgrounds. Some have undergraduate degrees in art history, others do not, and some are working artists. Studying for the MA is a chance to become part of a thriving academic community, with a sizeable and close-knit student body and a lively programme of research and social events.

Programme structure

You will study two core units and then select four optional units. Part-time students study the core units in the first year and stagger their optional units across the two years of the degree.

Optional units can vary each year but may include:
-Art and Memory
-Art in Russia and the Soviet Union
-Curating the Theatre Collection
-Collaborative Curatorial Unit
-Realism
-Text and Image
-Weimar Women: Representing Modernity

The research component of the programme is written over the summer and is submitted in September.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in History of Art have gone on to careers as journalists, art consultants, buying and marketing executives, and gallery assistants.

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This programme is an accelerated, fast-track, senior status postgraduate degree in Law. Read more
This programme is an accelerated, fast-track, senior status postgraduate degree in Law. The curriculum builds on the fact that you will have already benefited from a university-level education by enabling you to acquire a qualifying law degree in only 21 months, rather than the three years it would normally take to obtain an LLB.

The programme is carefully structured to cover the foundation areas of legal knowledge and to develop your core legal skills, while providing an opportunity for further specialist study.

The MA in Law is recognised by the Law Society and the Bar Council as a qualifying law degree for practice in England and Wales and is recognised in other jurisdictions.

Programme structure

Year One
Core units
-Law of Contract
-Land Law
-Law of Tort
-Public Law

These units are assessed by examination and/or essay. There will also be Introduction to Law lectures and seminars at the beginning of the degree.

Year Two
Core units
-Constitutional and Substantive Law of the European Union
-Criminal Law and Criminal Justice
-Law of Personal Property and Trusts

One optional unit chosen by the student from our range of postgraduate units

Careers

The MA in Law programme offers a wide choice of career paths. Graduates have gone on to qualify as solicitors or barristers in the UK, and as lawyers in other jurisdictions. Some graduates work in private practice, as in-house legal counsel for businesses or in the public sector. Others act as advisers in international organisations such as the European Union or the United Nations, or for international NGOs and other agencies. A number of graduates go on to further study in the UK or overseas.

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. It is ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report as the strongest department in the UK for mathematical logic, and the second strongest for philosophical logic.

Our MA draws on these strengths and is open to students with first degrees in philosophy (subject to a suitable background in logic) or mathematics. It consists of six taught units, examined by essay, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components, examined by essay, and a dissertation. You will take six taught units, normally three in each semester.

Core units
-Philosophical Writing and Research
-Axiomatic Set Theory
-Epistemology and Metaphysics
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Essay Unit

One optional unit
-Logic
-A second essay unit

Optional units can vary each year.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and twp will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of at most 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree.

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics have taken up careers as teachers and software developers. The IT industry has benefited from a number of graduates from this programme.

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This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music. Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. Read more
This flexible MA programme has pathways in Composition, Medieval Music, Musicology, Performance and Russian Music.

Modules taken vary according to the pathway chosen, but all include basic music training such as Research Skills for Musicians, specialised units specific to the pathway, and a large menu of optional units. These are followed by a major project: a musicological dissertation or edition for musicologists (including those on the Russian Music and Medieval Music pathways), a minor and a major recital for performers, and a portfolio of compositions for composers.

The content of this MA programme relates closely to the research interests of the academic staff.

Programme structure

Core units

All students take the Research Skills for Musicians unit (20 credits).

Optional units can vary each year but may include:

Composition Pathway
-Contemporary Compositional Ideas and Techniques (40 credits)
-Introduction to Professional Composing (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits)
-Portfolio of Compositions (60 credits)

Medieval Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Latin (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Musicology Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Performance Pathway
-Source Study, Palaeography and Editorial Techniques (20 credits)
-Four optional units (20 credits each)
-Performance (60 credits)

Russian Music Pathway
-Readings in Musicology (40 credits)
-Russian (20 credits)
-Two optional units (20 credits each)
-Dissertation or Edition (60 credits)

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Music have gone on to careers as musicians, senior music assistants, organ scholars and self-employed composers. A number of MA graduates have also become music teachers.

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The University of Bristol ranks among the top European institutions in the philosophy and history of science. We currently hold four major research grants to study Darwinism and Rational Choice, Epistemic Utility Theory, Homotopy Type Theory and a philosophy and medicine project on breathlessness. Read more
The University of Bristol ranks among the top European institutions in the philosophy and history of science. We currently hold four major research grants to study Darwinism and Rational Choice, Epistemic Utility Theory, Homotopy Type Theory and a philosophy and medicine project on breathlessness. Our expertise is in a broad range of areas related to the philosophy and history of the specific sciences, including physics, biology, mathematics, logic, medicine and psychology.

Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who have a first degree in philosophy who wish to specialise in philosophy and/or history of science at a higher level, and also for individuals with a background in pure science who wish to make a transition to philosophy and history of science or to explore foundational issues within the sciences.

The emphasis of the programme is on philosophical issues arising from specific scientific disciplines, with special emphasis on physics, biology and mathematics. The history of science is studied in terms of the philosophical debate about the nature of scientific method and knowledge.

You will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. All students are encouraged to participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and the weekly Philosophy and History of Science research seminar, which often features well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you are encouraged to present your own work, and where you will learn to develop argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

You will take six taught units (two compulsory and four optional).

Core units
-Scientific Methodology and Epistemology
-Philosophical Writing and Research Seminar

Optional units
-History of Science
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Philosophy and History of Medicine
-Philosophy of Biology
-Philosophy of Physics
-Philosophy of Psychology
-An individual, supervised research project
Please be aware that optional units may vary from year to year.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and two allows you to progress to writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree. You will have supervisory meetings with a member of staff who will also provide feedback on a draft of your work.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in Philosophy and History of Science have taken up careers in teaching, the IT sector and scientific administration.

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The MA in Philosophy will give you a thorough grounding in the core knowledge and skills required for philosophical research, while allowing you to pursue your own philosophical interests in depth. Read more
The MA in Philosophy will give you a thorough grounding in the core knowledge and skills required for philosophical research, while allowing you to pursue your own philosophical interests in depth.

You will be taught and supervised by members of a friendly and informal department with an outstanding reputation in the UK and internationally. The MA is designed for you to gain full advantage from the research expertise of individual members of staff. For more than half of the course, you will benefit from one-to-one tutorials with a member of the department. You will be guided throughout by a personal tutor who will help you structure your course of study and choose the topics you wish to research.

You will be an active member of our flourishing research culture and will be encouraged to participate in the three weekly research seminars on a wide range of philosophical issues. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers, helping you to develop argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

Core units
-Epistemology and Metaphysics Seminar
-Philosophical Writing and Research Seminar
-Value Theory Seminar

Optional units
You will take three optional units. For each of the three you may choose either:
-A taught seminar unit from a list of those available. The list changes from year to year but typically includes: Philosophy and History of Medicine; Philosophy of Science; Philosophy of Psychology; Philosophy of Biology; Philosophy of Physics; Philosophy of Mathematics; History of Science.
OR
-A unit taught by individual tutorials on an agreed topic of your choice.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and two will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree. You will have supervisory meetings with a member of staff who will provide feedback on a draft of your work.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in Philosophy have gone on to careers as counsellors, journalists and teachers of philosophy. A number of MA graduates have gone on to study at MLitt/PhD level and develop careers as philosophy academics.

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The Department of Philosophy has outstanding research strength in the fields of philosophy of biology, philosophy of psychology and philosophy of cognitive sciences. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has outstanding research strength in the fields of philosophy of biology, philosophy of psychology and philosophy of cognitive sciences.

We are ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report as the strongest department in the UK for the philosophy of biology. The department is also home to a European Research Council project on Darwinism and the Theory of Rational Choice, which explores connections between biological and cognitive science research.

This MA builds on these outstanding research strengths. It is intended for graduates of philosophy, psychology and biology who wish to study philosophy of science with an emphasis on the biological and cognitive sciences. The programme focuses on philosophical issues arising from these scientific disciplines. The history of science is studied in terms of the philosophical debate about the nature of scientific method and knowledge.

You will be an active member of the department's flourishing research culture. All students are encouraged to participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the weekly Philosophy and History of Science research seminar, which often features well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. The department has strong links with both the School of Experimental Psychology and the School of Biological Sciences, with whom joint workshops and reading groups are organised.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components, examined by essay, and a dissertation. You will take six taught units, normally three in each semester.

Core units
-Scientific Epistemology and Methodology
-Philosophical Writing and Research Seminar
-Philosophy of Biology
-Philosophy of Psychology

Optional units can vary each year but may include:
-History of Science
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Philosophy and History of Medicine
-Philosophy of Physics
-Individual, supervised research project

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and two will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree. You will have supervisory meetings with a member of staff who will also provide feedback on a draft of your work.

Careers

Students who have completed the MA in Philosophy of Biological and Cognitive Sciences have gone on to careers in teaching and science administration. A number of MA graduates pursue further studies in either philosophy or science.

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in philosophy of physics, and very strong links with the School of Physics. Our MA draws on these strengths. It is intended both for students who wish to specialise in philosophy of physics at a higher level, and for individuals with a background in physics or mathematics who wish to make a transition to philosophy and foundations of physics. The course consists of five taught units in philosophy, two taught master's units in physics, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

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The MA in Religion provides advanced study of the religious traditions of both the West and Asia. The programme offers two pathways. Read more
The MA in Religion provides advanced study of the religious traditions of both the West and Asia. The programme offers two pathways:
-Buddhist Studies
-Theology and Religious Studies

These reflect the expertise in the Department of Religion and Theology and allow you to study various religious traditions with scholars who are world-renowned experts in those fields.

Programme structure

Students follow one of two pathways, taking units worth 180 credit points.

BUDDHIST STUDIES PATHWAY
Core units (40 credit points):
-Buddhism: the Foundations (20 credit points)

Plus one of the following language units (20 credit points):
-Introductory Sanskrit I
-Classical Chinese
-Pali and Buddhist Sanskrit (only available to students with one year of Sanskrit)

NB: Not all languages will be taught each year

Optional units (80 credit points total; 20 credit points each). Optional units can vary each year but may include:
-Introductory Sanskrit 2
-Buddhism: The Mahayana Tradition
-The Practice of Theravada Buddhism in Asia
-Aspects of Chinese Buddhism
-Buddhist Psychology and Mental Health
-The Origins and Development of Zen Buddhism
-Yoga and Meditation
-Supervised Individual Study (on an aspect of Buddhism not covered by other units)
-An open MA unit chosen from those available in the Faculty of Arts

Dissertation
You will engage in supervised research on a topic of your choice and submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES PATHWAY
Core units
-Buddhism: The Foundations (20 credit points)
-History of Christianity: Core Texts (20 credit points)

Optional units (80 credit points total; 20 credit points each)
-Medieval Mystics and Visionaries in Medieval England
-Reflection on Religious Pluralism in Contemporary Society
-Alchemy, Magic and Science in Early Modernity
-The Renaissance and the Rise of the Modern Age
-Reflection on Religious Pluralism in Contemporary Society
-Greek Language Level A
-Latin Language Level A
-Jesus in an Age of Colonialism
-Ancient Jewish Novels
-Atheism
-Buddhism: The Mahayana Tradition
-The Origins and Development of Zen Buddhism
-Yoga and Meditation
-Buddhist Psychology and Mental Health
-An open MA unit chosen from those available across the Faculty of Arts.

Dissertation
You will engage in supervised research on a topic of your choice and submit a dissertation of between 10,000 and 15,000 words.

Careers

Students who complete this MA programme have taken up many different careers, including academic research, social work, banking and industry, counselling and teaching, design, journalism, film and the arts.

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