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King’s College London, Full Time MA Degrees

We have 88 King’s College London, Full Time MA Degrees

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Develop your knowledge and understanding of the experience of ageing societies and policies for an ageing world in our course. Ideal for social scientists, our course offers outstanding flexibility, with two pathways of study available. Read more

Develop your knowledge and understanding of the experience of ageing societies and policies for an ageing world in our course. Ideal for social scientists, our course offers outstanding flexibility, with two pathways of study available: the MSc pathway focuses on quantitative research methods and data analysis while the MA concentrates on qualitative research methods and analysis. Join one of the leading centres for the study of ageing and later life worldwide.

Key benefits

  • Taught by faculty in the Institute of Gerontology, one of the leading centres for the study of ageing. The Institute is located in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, a unique, research-led interdisciplinary social science department directed by internationally recognised scholars.
  • Offers a highly flexible study programme, drawing on a broad range of professional and disciplinary expertise and experience from geriatrics, demography, sociology and policy analysis.
  • Provides close links with, and regular speakers from, social policy and healthcare fields, providing insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of these areas as they affect ageing and older people.
  • Provides an awareness of national, crossnational and comparative perspectives of ageing populations, the ageing process and older people in society.
  • Located in the heart of London.
  • Provides education at the cutting edge of current research into ageing and later life, through taught modules and original research.

Description

The Ageing & Society course offers you great flexibility, with the choice to study either full or part-time and two pathways of study available; one channel focuses on quantitative research methods and data analysis while the other concentrates on qualitative research and data analysis. You will study the module Population, Ageing & Policy, plus a range of required and optional modules depending on your choice of pathway.

The MA, MSc pathway requires modules with a minimum total of 180 credits and a maximum of 185 credits to complete the course, with 60 credits coming from a dissertation of around 10,000-12,000 words.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying for the MA, MSc qualification part-time, your course will take two years to complete; you will be expected to take Population Ageing & Policy, Designing Quantitative Research and a 15-20 credit optional module in year one, with the remaining modules taken in year two.

Course purpose

While it is broadly aimed at social scientists, students include those in the social and natural sciences, management, policy and politics, law, and humanities as well as those from other disciplines such as allied health and social care professionals including nurses, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, dietitians and others fro health backgrounds.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 15-credit module:

Lectures, seminars and feedback: The total contact time for each 15-credit taught module is 10-15 hours. These sessions will include lectures, teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study.

Self-study: Each 15-credit taught module has approximately 135 hours of self-guided learning time.

Dissertation module: You will receive three dissertation workshops that are each two hours long plus six additional 30 minute one-toone dissertation supervision and group consultations.

Self-study: Approximately 591 hours.

Assessment

The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of essays, written examinations and oral presentations. The MA, MSc study programme also requires a 10-12,000 word supervised dissertation on the subject of ageing and society.

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to pursue of a range of careers including strategic positions in government, policy, voluntary and non-governmental organisations, as well as consultant positions in geriatric medicine and psychiatry and specialist healthcare roles with older people.



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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice. Read more

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice.

The study course offers you an excellent opportunity to further your career in TEFL/TESOL and develop expertise in specialist fields such as language assessment and testing, materials development, teaching EAP, management and evaluation and ESOL.

Please note that we also offer an alternative version of the Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA, in conjunction with International House London. That route involves a slightly different programme of study and leads to the award of the Cambridge DELTA, as well as the MA itself

Key benefits

  • Opportunities to expand your knowledge of current theoretical and practical aspects of language teaching.
  • Excellent tutorial support and extensive programme-specific training in research methods and academic writing.
  • Exchange ideas with other experienced language teaching professionals from many different backgrounds.
  • Opportunities to develop professional expertise relevant to your career development in areas such as EAP, teaching ESOL, materials development, language testing and assessment, teacher education.

Description

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA course offers you opportunities to explore current research and specialist areas such as teacher education, materials development, teaching English for academic purposes, management and evaluation in ELT and intercultural studies.

You will study required modules covering language-teaching methodology and curriculum design, linguistic analysis for language teaching, issues in language acquisition and use (sociolinguistics, social and psychological aspects of second language learning) and research methods. We also place emphasis on the view of informed teaching and the need for teachers to mediate between theory and practice in constructing pedagogies according to specific teaching-learning situations.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the 180-195 credit course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. If you have the Cambridge ESOL DELTA or Trinity House Diploma in ELT, you may be eligible for the ‘fast track’ version of the course which will give you exemption from Principles and Practices in Second/Foreign Language Teaching. The fast track option can only be studied part-time. As students on this pathway are exempt from a module, they will not take any taught modules in one of the terms (normally Term 1 of Year 2). They may, however, be working on their dissertation during this time. 

Course purpose

For experienced language teachers who want to reflect upon and further develop their understanding of the various theoretical and practical issues that impact on the field of language learning and teaching.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. The total contact time for each 30-credit taught module is typically 40 hours (20 hours per 15 credit module). These sessions will include lectures, teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study, in addition to other practical, technical and analytical activities. Each 30-credit taught module has 260 hours of self-guided learning time (130 hours for a 15 credit taught module). Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will receive six hours of one-to-one dissertation supervision. Lectures involving research methods will involve an additional 20 hours of contact time, to complement the 574 hours of self-study.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of essays, language analysis tasks, exams and oral presentations. Most optional modules are assessed by a 3,500-word essay. The dissertation will be assessed by one 15,000-word extended piece of writing. The format of your optional module assessment will depend on the options chosen.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates from the Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA course choose to remain in further education and go on to follow MPhil/PhD pathways.



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Students will learn about historical arms control challenges, such as negotiation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, along with contemporary arms control issues as they relate to international security, to include the Iran Nuclear Deal, U.S.-Russia arms control, and disarmament verification. Read more

Students will learn about historical arms control challenges, such as negotiation of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, along with contemporary arms control issues as they relate to international security, to include the Iran Nuclear Deal, U.S.-Russia arms control, and disarmament verification. Along with subject matter expertise, students will develop transferable analytic and research skills in a dynamic and rigorous intellectual environment.

Students will have the opportunity to meet arms control practitioners, negotiators, and inspectors. The course is particularly unique in combining history and theory with practical issues, skills development, and contemporary weapon of mass destruction policy.

Key Benefits:

  • Enhance your knowledge of arms control and its role in international security.
  • Develop transferable analytic and research skills.
  • Merge theoretical concepts with practical application, including guest lectures and teaching from arms control practitioners.

Description

The MA in Arms Control & International Security is a joint course with the Departments of War Studies and Defence Studies at King’s College London. The goal of the course is to enhance knowledge of a broad range of subjects relevant to arms control and international security. The course is available to both full and part-time students, and is available as an MA, Diploma, or Certificate. Required modules include: (1) History and Politics of Arms Control, (2) Verification Concepts and Technologies, and (3) Arms Control Case Studies. Modules will be conducted in intensive week-long sessions so as to accommodate professional students. Each module will be highly interactive with a combination of lectures, seminars, and group discussion, and include formative assessment. Student performance will be assessed in an essay for each module and MA students will be required to write an individual research dissertation.

Course purpose

Ideally, this course will train the next generation of arms control practitioners and experts by building their expertise in the fundamentals and history of arms control, while also exposing them to practical issues and challenges, such as verification.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 20-credit required module:

For your lectures, seminars and feedback, you will have week-long intensive session consisting of 10 hours of lectures and 10 hours of seminars. In addition you will have 180 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 20-credit and some required optional modules:

For your lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have two hours per week over two 10-week terms. This can be split into one lecture + one seminar or combinations thereof. You will also have 180 hours of self-study.

Per 40-credit optional module:

For your lectures, seminars and feedback, you will typically have two hours per week over two 10-week terms per 40-credit optional module. This can be split into one lecture + one seminar or combinations thereof, as well as 360 hours of self-study.

Dissertation module:

You will have 12 hours of training workshops/supervision to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is:

  • The 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays, presentation, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be 100% dissertation (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

Although this is a new course, other King’s MA students in similar fields have gone on to work at top global think tanks, in government, or to pursue PhDs in a relevant field.



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Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. Read more

Delivered from one of the world’s cultural capitals, this MA is designed to meet the complex needs of today’s arts and cultural manager. With its distinctive mix of theoretical, and arts-based knowledge and skills development, you will learn how to apply creative leadership in managing artistic excellence, cultural heritage, audience diversity and financial sustainability at local and global levels.

Key benefits

  • Head start your career through focused teaching.
  • Insights into management, planning and leadership.
  • Gain knowledge of arts and culture across national and international contexts.
  • Strong links with London’s cultural organisations.
  • Lectures and workshops from leading arts and cultural industry professionals.
  • Emphasis on creativity and arts-based learning.

Description

This innovative new master's course is specifically designed to meet the needs of the arts and cultural manager. 

You will learn the vital importance of creativity, given the increasingly global nature of competition, as well as the opportunities and threats posed by new technologies. 

Our Arts & Cultural Management MA is suitable for you whether you are new to the field or if you already have relevant professional experience. The course works in partnership with a range of arts organisations from across the city to offer you unparalleled exposure to the practicalities of cultural management. Through our required modules, you will engage with experienced cultural managers and leading London-based arts organisations. We will also assist you in undertaking an internship, where you can gain work experience in the arts or creative industries and develop the skills, knowledge and motivation needed to build a career.

Previous students from within the Department have interned at the National Theatre, Barbican Centre, British Council, British Film Institute, Hayward Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Screen Digest, The British Museum, CIDA (Cultural Industries Development Agency), MTV, Donmar Warehouse, Google and the V&A Museum, which gives you an idea of the exciting opportunities on offer.

Course purpose

The MA in Arts & Cultural Management is suitable for those new to the field as well as individuals with existing arts and cultural work experience. It provides a critical understanding of arts and cultural management for graduates seeking a career in arts management or for professionals wishing to enhance their existing knowledge and career prospects. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you’re a full-time student we will provide you with 140 hours of teaching over the course through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 1668 hours of independent study.

If you’re a part-time student, in your first year we will provide 76 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 540 hours of independent study. In your second year, we will provide 78 hours of teaching, and we will expect you to undertake 1128 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We will assess your performance entirely through coursework and a dissertation.



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Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. . Read more

Our Big Data in Culture & Society MA recognises the growing importance of Big Data in contemporary society and addresses the theory and practice of Big Data from an arts and humanities perspective. 

What is Big Data? Beyond the unprecedentedly large data sets that can be analysed to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, it is increasingly about our everyday lives. In short, it is about how the data we generate is transforming social, cultural, political and economic processes as well as the generation of knowledge.

This course is likely to appeal to a broad range of students across the Arts and Humanities from Sociology to Political Science to English to Business and beyond. It will attract forward-thinking students interested in emerging trends who recognise that data scientists and analysts require collaborators with domain specialisation and critical insights.

  • Taught by scholars working at the leading edge of digital studies and Big Data.
  • Offers a lively mix of theory and practical work.
  • Equips students with skills that are highly attractive to employers in our digital age.
  • Provides a series of workshops with data scientists and analysts to learn collaborative practices and applications in social media and cultural analytics, mobile platforms, and data visualisation.
  • Is at the forefront of digital developments - Big Data is transforming society, politics, the economy and culture and impacting work
  • Offers innovative interdisciplinary methods of study crossing technological and cultural perspectives
  • Links Big Data to Culture, Law & Ethics, Geography, Public Health, and Social Life
  • Located in a highly ranked department - the Digital Humanities department was ranked first in the UK for research power (2014 Research Excellence Framework)

Description

This Big Data in Culture & Society MA offers you the opportunity to develop your knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It will enable you to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas. In addition to the required content we cover, you will have the opportunity to pursue your own academic interests through our optional modules and to undertake an internship and a group project module.

By bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills and approaching these from an Arts and Humanities perspective, the course will help you develop highly valued employment skills and expertise for careers in Big Data.

The course will provide you with:

  • Knowledge and understanding of the effects of Big Data on contemporary society.
  • Critical and theoretical approaches to the analysis of Big Data.
  • Knowledge of the historical antecedents of Big Data.
  • Understanding of the innovative methods for generating new knowledge through the use and analysis of Big Data.
  • Understanding of Big Data in relation to the broader study of digital culture, the digital humanities and traditional humanities disciplines.
  • Understanding of appropriate personal and professional conduct in the context of digital culture as an emerging discipline. 

Course purpose

The MA Big Data in Culture and Society offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the role of Big Data in culture and society. It enables them to analyse Big Data across social, political and economic areas and provides them with a background for pursuing careers in Big Data by bringing together domain knowledge and technical skills. 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars across the year. We expect you to undertake around 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we’ll provide you with 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We’ll expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess our modules entirely through coursework. This will comprise a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Career prospects

Our graduates will follow a broad range of career paths. The skills you develop are likely to be particularly transferable to work in social media management, analytics & website management, CRM management, digital advertising, metrics management, market research, marketing and across cultural industries.



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Our Child Studies MA is a multidisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of professionals and graduates working or intending to work with or on behalf of children and young people. Read more

Our Child Studies MA is a multidisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of professionals and graduates working or intending to work with or on behalf of children and young people. The course is aimed at anyone in a child safeguarding role, including social workers, child and family lawyers, named or designated health practitioners, teachers, police officers and NGO staff.

Key benefits

  • The MA Child Studies is delivered by internationally renowned speakers, clinicians and academics.
  • We offer a multi-disciplinary approach to childhood issues and current policy developments.
  • You will study modules based on contemporary issues in child protection and children’s rights.
  • We provide opportunities for you to collaborate and share ideas and experiences with others from different disciplines.

Description

The Child Studies MA is a demanding course that concentrates on an academic and analytical approach to modern-day issues of childhood. The course features a range of modules that are highly relevant to those who are working or intending to work with vulnerable children. We welcome graduates from a variety of disciplines and professions including medicine, education, law, social care, psychology and sociology.

The course combines a range of required and optional modules to a value of between 180 and 190 credits. In addition to a required dissertation, you will take required modules covering Children’s Rights and Child Protection, and then choose from a wide range of relevant optional modules, such as Global Childhoods, Child Health & Development, and Psychology and Learning. 

Course purpose

Designed for professional and personal development, as well as academic. We aim to enable you to develop a multidisciplinary approach to childhood issues within the context of current policy developments. Students come from a variety of disciplines and professions including medicine, education, law, social care, psychology and sociology.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. A significant proportion of teaching on the course is delivered by expert external lecturers, both academics and practitioners. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

The teaching contact time for each 30-credit taught Child Studies module is typically 30.5-32 hours. In addition each module will involve one hour of supervision/Q&A time. The typical teaching contact time for each 30-credit taught ‘Education’ optional module is 20 hours. Teaching sessions will usually include lectures, and teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study.

There are 12 hours of teaching for the internship module; this is supplemented by the support of Careers and Employability and mentoring through the internship itself. Students also complete at least 160 hours of employment. Each 30-credit taught module has 267-280 (or 288 for the internship module) hours of self-guided learning time.

For the dissertation module, you will receive 22 hours of research methods training. You may also choose to take research methods as an optional module. You will also receive six to eight hours of dissertation workshops, plus nine additional hours of individual dissertation supervision, to complement the approximately 561-563 hours of self-study.

Contact hours for optional modules taken outside of the course, may vary.

Assessment

This course is assessed by a combination of essays, reports, examinations, presentations, research proposals and case studies. Your assessment methods will be determined by your choice of optional modules. The dissertation is an extended piece of writing of 16,000 words.

Career prospects

Our graduates frequently progress to senior practitioner posts involving child-related work. Recent graduate destinations have included Anna Freud Centre, Barnardo’s, St Christopher’s residential child care services and local authority children’s services.



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Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London. The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years. Read more

Christianity and the Arts is taught in association with the National Gallery in London.

The course investigates how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in art over 2,000 years. It traces the idea of beauty in Western theological tradition; makes use of examples in London.

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, journalism or the church.

Key benefits

  • Will enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.
  • Will use rich cultural resources beyond the university – and specifically the artistic, human and web-based resources of the National Gallery.
  • Will provide opportunities for students to learn outside the university, in the context of an art museum, with likely additional visits/links to institutions with related collections, like the Courtauld Gallery, and the Victoria and Albert Museum.
  • Will enhance the experience of international students at the university by giving them a stimulating and privileged understanding of one of London’s (and the world’s) greatest treasuries of art.

Description

Our MA in Christianity and the Arts will investigate how Christian scripture, beliefs and practices have found expression in the arts over 2000 years. The course features a required module on the Idea of Beauty in Western Theology and a wide range of optional modules looking at different forms of artistic expression, different artistic periods with a focus on specific elements of the Christian narrative. You will also have the opportunity to explore a topic in detail through your dissertation.

Wherever possible the course draws on examples and case studies here in London, particularly the collections at The National Gallery, The Courtauld Institute and The Victoria and Albert Museum. We will help you to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore both the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

Course purpose

To enable students to work across disciplinary and specialism boundaries, and in particular to explore simultaneously the art-historical and theological dimensions of Christian art – approaches which are generally pursued in isolation from one another.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you’re a full-time student, each week we’ll provide six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We’ll expect you to undertake 34 of independent study.

If you’re a part-time student, each week we’ll provide two to four hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We’ll expect you to undertake 17 hours of independent study.

Typically one credit amounts to 10 hours of work. 

Assessment

We assess the majority of our modules through coursework and/or examination, although other departments may differ. Your dissertation will be a 15,000-word thesis.

Career prospects

Our graduates use the skills and knowledge that they develop with us to pursue careers in teaching, journalism, media, museum work and the church, or other religious institutions. Others have continued their studies with further research. 



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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.



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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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The Climate Change. History, Culture, Society MA course provides you with the theories, methods and skills required to analyse climate change, and the responses it generates among different national, political and social groupings. Read more

The Climate Change: History, Culture, Society MA course provides you with the theories, methods and skills required to analyse climate change, and the responses it generates among different national, political and social groupings. The course encourages you to examine historical, cultural and social perspectives on climate change, enabling you to gain a better understanding of how people in different settings around the world make sense of climate change. 

Key benefits

  • This course will introduce you to the social status of contemporary climate change science.
  • Innovative modules in a range of disciplines taught by staff who are recognised leaders in their fields.
  • A diverse range of research opportunities to prepare you for a career working in the public and private sector organisations which deal with the human causes and consequences of climate change.
  • The course is highly flexible and can be tailored to reflect your academic interests.

Description

The Climate Change: History, Culture, Society MA course reflects on the theory that climate change has penetrated all aspects of human life; and that a wholly cultural analysis of the notion – one that goes beyond that offered by scientific, political and economic analysis – is necessary to understand climate change fully. You will take a broad range of modules covering human beliefs, attributes and practices, peoples’ worldviews and values, narratives of development and environmental change, and the changing nature of expertise. You will gain valuable insights on all of these topics, as well as an introduction to the social status of contemporary climate change science

This course is made up of required and optional modules. You must take a minimum of 180 credits to complete the course. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will be delivered over two years. You will take the required combination of required and optional modules over this period of time, with the dissertation in your second year.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Per 20-credit module: 

Lectures, seminars and feedback: Typically 20 hours.

Self-study: 180 hours (some modules in the Geography Department may involve lab work or e-learning which would require less selfguided learning).

 Dissertation: 

Lectures, seminars and feedback: Usually four dissertation workshops/tutorials and five contact hours of one-to-one or group consultation with supervisors.

Self-study: 587 hours of self-study and project work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

This MA is designed to prepare students for careers working in the many public and private sector organisations which have to deal with the human causes and consequences of climate change. The Programme develop students’ understanding of the intersection between climate change and culture, and cultivates transferable skills suitable for policy-facing organisations, cultural institutions, international and national governmental and non-governmental organisations and environmental consultancies. The Master’s programme also develops the necessary knowledge and research skills for students who wish to undertake PhD research on the human dimensions of climate change.



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Study literature from six different continents covering over 2,500 years,comparing literatures from across the world, written in many different languages, in different cultures from antiquity to the present. Read more

Study literature from six different continents covering over 2,500 years,comparing literatures from across the world, written in many different languages, in different cultures from antiquity to the present.

We offer a unique range of courses from classical Greek and Latin right up to twenty-first century European, Asian, Middle-Eastern, African, American and Pacific literature.

You will also have the opportunity to develop your language skills.

Key benefits

  • Exceptional geographical and historical range of literature options.
  • Staff who are leading experts in European and World Literatures.
  • Thematic approaches.
  • Opportunity to study modules from across the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.
  • Located in the heart of London, close to libraries and cultural institutions.
  • An internationally respected MA that offers a springboard to further study.

Description

Our Comparative Literature MA provides an introduction to the practice, methodology and theory of comparative literary studies through our required module. You will then focus on more specific aspects of literary themes, genres, and historical periods, and choose a subject for your dissertation that also has a comparative focus. This flexibility means that you can pursue your own academic interests and develop a specialism of your choosing. In addition, our Modern Language Centre provides modules at all appropriate levels to support your study of foreign language texts.

This course is ideal for students who want to look beyond conventional literary canons and engage in comparative study across a wide range of cultures.

Course purpose

The MA in Comparative literature is designed for students who want to look beyond conventional literary cannons and engage in comparative study across a wide range of cultures.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with at least six hours of teaching a week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 33 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 of independent study.

For your dissertation, which you will focus on over summer, we will provide four hours of supervision and you will undertake 594 hours of independent study. If you are a part-time student we will provide two to three hours of supervision in your second year.

Assessment

We will typically assess our modules through coursework, although some modules may make use of blogs and presentations. Your dissertation will be a 10,000-word essay.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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Rooted in your practical experience, the MA programme draws on the latest research and emphasises evidence-based information about computing and computational thinking in education, e-learning / Technology Enhanced Learning and digital literacy. Read more
Rooted in your practical experience, the MA programme draws on the latest research and emphasises evidence-based information about computing and computational thinking in education, e-learning / Technology Enhanced Learning and digital literacy. Develop a critical understanding of computing in education and enhance your pedagogical skills.

Key benefits

- Cutting-edge research and a high profile research active staff.

- Highly supportive teaching and the climate built around success, excellence and commitment.

- Flexibility in learning, whether you are a full or part-time UK, EU or international student through a blend of face-to-face blocks in the heart of London and online activities.

- Develops your pedagogical skills and analytical understanding of computing and computational thinking in education, e-learning / Technology Enhanced Learning and digital literacy in education and their roles in your professional practice.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/computing-in-education-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

As part of our department's successful modular programme, running for over a decade, the MA is constantly updated and draws on the latest research in the development of computational thinking, e-learning/technologically enhanced learning and digital literacy. Through the programme you will develop a critical understanding of your professional expertise in developing computational thinking as well as using and managing digital technologies for teaching and/or learning. You will have the opportunity to develop your practical capabilities by designing and evaluating activities using a variety of approaches to learning including a range of digital technologies and / technologically enhanced learning, digital literacy and the development of computational thinking.
The programme is open to UK, EU and international students and is taught using a blend of face-to-face and on-line activities.

- Course purpose -

For all those who teach, lecture or organise educational provision at any level. To enable professionals concerned with education to reflect on their practice and to inform such reflection by extending their knowledge. You will be made aware of significant current developments and of contemporary pedagogical practices both in computing in education and in enabling Technology Enhanced Learning. Those who teach computing as a subject can select modules that update their understanding of recent curricula and develop their pedagogical thinking. A flexible subject knowledge enhancement programme will run in parallel for ICT teachers who need to upgrade their subject knowledge for teaching new computing curricula.

- Course format and assessment -

There are no examinations - all modules are assessed by written work.

Core modules:

• Recent Developments in Digital Technologies in Education
• A subject specific dissertation

The programme may be taken over one year (full time) or two years (part time). A serving teacher would normally complete the MA on a part time basis and complete one module in each of the autumn and spring terms in year 1, plus a further two modules and the dissertation in year 2.

The sessions for each module normally take place on one evening each week from 5.30 - 7.30pm at the Waterloo Campus. The compulsory Recent Developments in Digital Technologies in Education module involves two face-to-face sessions on Saturdays and 10 online sessions.

Career prospects

Career enhancement; research; educational software design.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Our Conflict Resolution in Divided Societies MA offers a multidisciplinary, comparative study of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in deeply divided societies. Read more

Our Conflict Resolution in Divided Societies MA offers a multidisciplinary, comparative study of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in deeply divided societies. It focuses on cases from the Middle East, comparing these to case studies from around the world, examining the theoretical literature on the causes and consequences of conflict, conflict regulation, and internationally led and grassroots peace processes.

Key benefits

  • Additional academic development, mentoring and time to ensure your intellectual development.
  • A wide range of optional modules taught by international leading scholars in conflict resolution, conflict studies and Middle East studies.
  • Engagement with leading practitioners, including from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council, the media, civil society organisations.
  • Exposure to latest debates through regular public lectures organised by the department and its research clusters.
  • Opportunity to study Arabic, Turkish, Farsi or Hebrew through King’s Modern Language Centre.
  • Strong intellectual and methodological foundations for further research. Research skills for archival research as well as qualitative and quantitative research methodologies for the social sciences.
  • Develop communication skills by presenting and disseminating research in written and oral forms to classmates, tutors, and the wider academic community.

Description

This course examines the causes, consequences and outcomes of national, ethnic and religious conflicts in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will give you an understanding of theories of conflict and conflict regulation in deeply divided societies and how these apply to a wide range of cases, with special but not exclusive attention given to the Middle

East. Topics covered include, indicatively, the dynamics of nationalism, sectarianism and identity, the role of civil society in peace processes, truth and reconcilation commissions, and the role of collective memory.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

For every 20-credit module, we will provide you with two hours of teaching a week during term time, and we expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, you will have a twelve-session Research Methods course and four hours of consultation with a supervisor. You will undertake 580 hours of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Taught modules: Full-time students can typically expect six hours of lectures/seminars per week and part-time students can expect four hours of lectures/seminars per week in the first year and two hours of lectures/seminars per week in the second year, plus the dissertation methods course and the dissertation module.

Dissertation module: 12-session Research Methods course and four contact hours of consultation with a supervisor.

The approximate workload for 20-credit modules offered by the Department of Middle Eastern Studies is 20 hours of lectures and seminars and 180 hours of self-guided learning. Dissertation: 580 hours self-study and project work.

Assessment

We assess Conflict & Coexistence in Divided Societies module by essays and class participation. 

We assess optional taught modules by essay and, in some cases, by class participation.

Career prospects

Our graduates take the skills that they develop to become leaders in the public and private sectors, academia, government, diplomacy and journalism.



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The MA Conflict, Security & Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. . Read more

The MA Conflict, Security & Development explores the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. 

Key benefits

  • Development and security are inextricably linked, yet all too often both academics and policymakers address them separately. Our MA in Conflict, Security & Development is a unique globally recognised course that brings together these interrelated areas of study, acknowledging that conflict, insecurity and underdevelopment interact in dynamic ways and that a full understanding of them requires a holistic approach.
  • The course exposes you to a variety of complex transnational issues, taking a multidisciplinary approach to some of the key questions facing policymakers and scholars today.
  • It is designed to enhance your analytical, research and critical thinking skills, to provide you with detailed practical knowledge of conflict, security and development around the world, and to prepare you to become a leader in the public and private sectors, government or academia.

Description

Our course is designed to provide students with an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the complex linkages between issues of security and development in contemporary international relations. The course encourages

you to explore the conceptual, historical and policy issues surrounding security and development and how these manifest themselves in the wider context of contemporary warfare and international security. Our course’s core course introduces you to the major debates in the fields of security and international relations, regarding the interaction between processes of political and economic development, conflict and violent social change.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

There will be 40 hours of teaching per 40-credit module and 360 hours of self-study. For the dissertation module there will be 12 hours of dissertation supervision, to complement 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is:

  • Most 20 and 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (2,000-6,000 words), presentations, oral vivas and/or exams.
  • The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 100% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words).

Career prospects

Students on our MA courses have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching, and the armed forces.



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