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University of York, Full Time MA Degrees

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching (MAALELT). Read more
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching (MAALELT). Applicants' first degree should be in a related subject, such as language, linguistics or education, with a substantial component of English.

MAALELT is for those who are interested in pursuing an MA relating to TESOL and who will have the equivalent of at least one year's full-time English teaching experience by the time the course starts; this experience of teaching can be with any age of learner, and any stages of learning.This teaching experience is normally after you have obtained your first degree. Teacher training internships, casual private tutoring and holiday camps are not normally sufficient.

You must indicate clearly on the main application form that you have this experience, giving all of the following information:
-The start date and finish date of your teaching experience. If you will be teaching until the MA starts, please write 'on going until MA starts'
-The type of establishment you have taught in (e.g. primary, secondary, university, private language school, etc.)
-Whether you were full or part time. If part time, tell us how much you taught per week.

You will also need to provide formal evidence of your teaching experience, for example a professional reference.

If by the time the MA at York begins, you will not have the equivalent of at least one year's full time experience, please consider applying for the MATESOL instead.

Aims

The aim of the programme is to provide a broad-based Masters in English (TESOL) language education informed by theoretical and practical concerns. The programme does not offer a language teaching qualification; it does offer advanced inquiry into the processes of language learning, with specific reference to second language learning. Applications are welcome from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1 September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

Overseas applicants are also advised to check how long it is likely to take for their visa to be processed and to allow sufficient time in order that they are able to begin their programme of study on time.

Programme Content

Term 1
-Language for education (20 credits)
-Research methods in language learning and teaching (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Teaching and learning language (20 credits)
-Language curriculum design and evaluation (20 credits)

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits.) These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become English language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools, universities and other organisations requiring English language instruction.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Read more
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Applicants' first degree should be in a related subject, such as language, linguistics or education.

To be eligible for this MA, you must have the equivalent of at least one year's teaching experience by the time the course starts; this can involve any language, any age of learner and any stages of learning. This teaching experience is normally after you have obtained your first degree. Teacher training internships, casual private tutoring and holiday camps are not normally sufficient.
You must indicate clearly on the main application form that you have this experience, giving all of the following information:
-The start date and finish date of your teaching experience,
If you will be teaching until the MA starts, please write 'on going until MA starts'
-The type of establishment you have taught in (e.g. primary, secondary, university, private language school, etc.)
-Whether you were full or part time. If part time, tell us how much you taught per week.

You will also need to provide formal evidence of your teaching experience, for example a professional reference.

If by the time the MA at York begins, you will not have the equivalent of at least one year's full time experience, please consider applying for the MA in TESOL instead.

Aims

The aim of the programme is to provide a broad-based Masters in language education informed by theoretical and practical concerns. The programme does not offer a language teaching qualification; it does offer advanced inquiry into the processes of language learning, with specific reference to second language learning. Applications are welcome from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1 September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

Overseas applicants are also advised to check how long it is likely to take for their visa to be processed and to allow sufficient time in order that they are able to begin their programme of study on time.

Programme Content

Term 1
-Language for education (20 credits)
-Research methods in language learning and teaching (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL Classroom Practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Teaching and learning language (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits.) These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools and universities.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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Research degrees, based on the writing of a thesis, can be undertaken in three ways - for this course, it is. MA by research (one year fulltime). Read more
Research degrees, based on the writing of a thesis, can be undertaken in three ways - for this course, it is:
MA by research (one year fulltime)

Facilities

The graduate study building provides room for reading and quiet reflection. It is dedicated solely to providing facilities for postgraduate research, with individual/shared carrels, a suite of computers, and shared workspace for sorting material or laying out illustrations. The building has been designed to provide an attractive yet effective atmosphere for study and writing. It also aims to create an environment which brings together postgraduate researchers in a friendly and communal way.

A group of CAD machines, with digitising tablets and printers, is available, as is a range of state-of-the-art survey and geophysical equipment. Cameras can be borrowed, and there are the necessary facilities and equipment for illustration. Laboratories are available for use, including the new BioArch laboratories for biomolecular archaeology and excellent reference collections exist for environmental archaeology and conservation of materials.

Support

All research students have a supportive structure of supervision, with a main supervisor and two other members of staff who follow progress, are available for advice, and sit on the student's Thesis Advisory Panel.

Research community

Research seminars are run within the Department and at the Centres for Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies, and in the Department of Biology. Numerous special interest research groups also hold meetings and conferences at King's Manor, and this allows research students to keep in touch with latest developments in their field.

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. Read more
York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. This MA is intended for students who wish to develop their skills and interests in a range of community settings and it draws upon many department specialisms including developments in education and disability arts, world music, theatre and technology.

About 'Community Music'

The term ‘community music’ covers a wide range of activities.

It covers musicians working outside formal settings like the concert-hall in, for example, schools, prisons or hospitals; it covers the development of music in under-resourced areas and with disadvantaged people, and it covers the development of creative partnerships between people of different skills and cultures.

It is now a growing career option. Many orchestras and arts organisations are seeking to extend their audience base into the community. Many young musicians, in response to changing employment patterns, are developing multi-skilled ‘portfolio’ careers or are simply expressing a personal preference for more participatory forms of work.

Course structure

The MA is based on short course modules, a seminar series and a placement and related dissertation.

The short course modules are offered as a five-day block, two per term, starting on a Wednesday or Thursday and finishing the following week. This five-day structure has proved ideal for mature students and those wishing to fit the course around work commitments. All students are expected to have attended all six short course modules by the end of their course.

Weekly 1½ hour seminars on ‘Issues of Professional Development’ are held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. These seminars carry credits but no marks. Two of these per term will be included in the short course modules, to accommodate part time students. The seminar in week 7, Spring Term will take the form of a course review.

The placement comprises ten days contact with an outside agency by arrangement. The dissertation is 10,000-12,000 words (or an equivalent package including recordings and video). Together they form a research project.

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Rigorous training in the comparative analysis of institutions, from local to international. The MA in Comparative and International Social Policy will train you in comparative and international policy analysis, research and design. Read more
Rigorous training in the comparative analysis of institutions, from local to international.

Overview

The MA in Comparative and International Social Policy will train you in comparative and international policy analysis, research and design. It is ideal for those working in, or wishing to work in international policy analysis and policy development in governments, charities and NGOs around the world.

It is based in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work which was ranked equal first in the UK for the impact of its research, with 87% of its research activity rated as world leading or internationally excellent.

This MA is especially suitable for:
-Graduates from degrees in social policy, politics, sociology, international studies or other social sciences
-Graduates from other backgrounds who wish to develop a high quality of graduate level research training in social research methods and policy analysis
-Graduates who wish to develop an understanding of comparative and international welfare institutional arrangements
-Those looking to develop a career in social research and/or policy analysis

Course content

The MA in Comparative and International Social Policy is based around a combination of social policy analysis and research training. You'll start with a solid introduction to comparative social research methods and social policy analysis. You'll then explore how social policy is affected by globalisation. You'll finish with a comparative exploration of how emerging governance structures and actors affect the management and delivery of social policy in national and international settings.

This masters degree has a broad international approach, rooted in the analysis of higher income countries in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) and adapting this to a study of a broader sample of countries across the globe.

This particular masters degree attracts an international student body so you'll benefit from a truly comparative experience.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Social Policy Analysis
-Comparative and International Social Policy - Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take two more compulsory modules that focus on international and comparative social policy:
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

You'll examine how social policy is affected by globalisation in four regions: Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Latin America and Asia.
More details on the MA in Comparative and International Social Policy modules.

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop and present your research interests. You will participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Comparative and International Social Policy develops skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially policy analysis and research. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

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Social and policy research coupled with comparative analysis that has an international dimension. This masters programme is ideal for mid-career professionals. Read more
Social and policy research coupled with comparative analysis that has an international dimension.

Overview

This masters programme is ideal for mid-career professionals. You'll find the course useful if you are, or intend to, work with policy; either as an adviser, researcher, analyst or consultant.

You'll study a strongly international curriculum that is based around a combination of comparative social and public policy management and advanced research skills training. This course builds directly on our applied policy research expertise, both in the taught modules which draw heavily on our own research and in the practice-relevant activity that provides an opportunity to participate in ongoing policy research projects.

Course content

This is a 21-month course that specialises in social and public policy analysis and social research. You'll focus on comparative cross-national and international policy. You'll also spend time analysing policy development and policy lessons from OECD member states.

The first half of this MPA will enable you to study and explore a combination of comparative social policy and public management. In the second half you'll get advanced research skills training. You'll undertake practice related activities including small group projects that will expose you to applied policy research in practice with the support of a learning mentor.

Modules
You'll study six modules in your first year that will introduce you to the concepts and techniques you'll use later in the course. You'll also build on your knowledge with a series of masterclasses and your own policy analysis.
-Social Policy Analysis
-Comparative and International Social Policy Research Methods
-Globalisation and Social Policy
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Applied Policy Transfer Project
-Comparative Applied Social and Public Policy, Evaluation and Research Master Classes

Placement
You'll undertake a placement which is selected, where possible, to match your interests, expertise and career aspirations. You'll work alongside a mentor with expertise in policy-related activities.

In your second year you'll study five modules that build advanced research skills and allow you to deepen your understanding of applied social and public policy. You'll also write an experiential analysis of your placement experiences and undertake detailed independent study on a topic that links to your professional interests and experience.
-Introduction to Social Research Methods
-Applied Policy Research Placement Report
-Advanced Quantitative Methods
-Advanced Qualitative Methods
-Placement Linked Systematic Review Report

You'll work on two independent projects that will be assessed as part of your course.

In your first year you'll work on the Applied Policy Transfer Project to produce a 8,000 word report under the supervision of your mentor. You'll be able to specialise on a specific policy issue in which you'll explore cross-national evidence to identify policy solutions that may be transferred from one country to another.

Towards the end of your second year you'll undertake a longer independent project in which you'll produce a structured scoping review of up to 10,000 words.

Careers

This course is ideal for mid-career professionals that aim to work in, or already work in, social or public policy.

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The MA in Comparative Syntax and Semantics will allow students to develop their own areas of interest and expertise in generative syntax and/or formal semantics. Read more
The MA in Comparative Syntax and Semantics will allow students to develop their own areas of interest and expertise in generative syntax and/or formal semantics.

Overview

The MA in Comparative Syntax & Semantics is aimed at students who have enough background in both syntax and semantics to know that they wish to specialise in those areas.

The programme focuses on the cross-linguistic perspective, allowing students to strengthen their knowledge of formal syntax and formal semantics.

Course structure

Autumn Term
In the Autumn Term students will take 40 credits in Syntax and Semantics modules, typically:
-Issues at the syntax and semantics interface (20 credits)
-Comparative syntax and syntactic typology (20 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term students will take two 20-credit modules in Syntax and Semantics, typically:
-Advanced comparative syntactic or semantic typology (20 credits)
-Advanced topics at the interfaces of syntax (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (80 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

Assessment

Autumn and Spring Terms
Each module will be assessed by written assignments, usually a 5,000 word essay or equivalent.

Dissertation
The course culminates in a sustained period of independent research and the production of a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. You can see more detail on the programme and the department in the current postgraduate handbook.

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Investigate the challenges that face our rapidly evolving but delicately balanced world. Development is an inherently political process of change that tests human relationships. Read more
Investigate the challenges that face our rapidly evolving but delicately balanced world.

Overview

Development is an inherently political process of change that tests human relationships. By exploring these relationships you’ll see the connections between violent and non-violent conflict, processes of development, and how they relate to the governance of our modern world.

You’ll get to examine key conflict and development case studies and apply major theories of international development to deepen your understanding of local, national and global processes of change as part of this dynamic course.

Course Content

Enjoy vibrant discussions and debate across two core modules that are designed to draw the very most from our department’s in-depth research experience, which spans the Middle East, Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South-East Asia and Eastern Europe.

It’s a course that attracts students with experience in conflict and development practice from around the world, so you also learn and benefit from each other’s knowledge and experience.

Modules
You'll study two core modules:
-Theories and Policies of Development Governance
-Conflict and Development

Plus, four optional modules from a range of subjects.

During the summer term and vacation you will consolidate your interests in a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Careers

From social and political research to journalism, marketing and HR, a masters degree in Conflict, Governance & Development leads to a broad range of career opportunities. You might find yourself working for:
-Central or local government
-Non-governmental organisations
-Community and voluntary organisations
-A Social enterprise
-A university
-Accountancy and banking orgs
-Law firms
-Media companies
-International and global development bodies / organisations

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If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests. Read more
If you are at all interested in undertaking a research degree, then you should not hesitate contacting the member/s of staff who share your research interests.

We have some funded PhDs via Research Councils such as NERC and the AHRC. Also, we hope to be able to advertise individual funded PhDs, with pre-defined subject areas, each year - please watch our front page for details.

Facilities

The graduate study building provides room for reading and quiet reflection. It is dedicated solely to providing facilities for postgraduate research, with individual/shared carrels, a suite of computers, and shared workspace for sorting material or laying out illustrations. The building has been designed to provide an attractive yet effective atmosphere for study and writing. It also aims to create an environment which brings together postgraduate researchers in a friendly and communal way.

A group of CAD machines, with digitising tablets and printers, is available, as is a range of state-of-the-art survey and geophysical equipment. Cameras can be borrowed, and there are the necessary facilities and equipment for illustration. Laboratories are available for use, including the new BioArch laboratories for biomolecular archaeology and excellent reference collections exist for environmental archaeology and conservation of materials.

Support

All research students have a supportive structure of supervision, with a main supervisor and two other members of staff who follow progress, are available for advice, and sit on the student's Thesis Advisory Panel.

Research community

Research seminars are run within the Department and at the Centres for Medieval Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies, and in the Department of Biology. Numerous special interest research groups also hold meetings and conferences at King's Manor, and this allows research students to keep in touch with latest developments in their field.

Careers

All of the postgraduate Archaeology courses at York have a strong focus on employability. We aim to equip students with highly valued specialist and transferable skills, in a range of archaeological disciplines. The courses provide students with a deep understanding of relevant theories and principles, alongside extensive practical experience and access to the latest technologies and systems.

Postgraduates from our Masters’ courses have gone on to a wide range of careers in the archaeology sector and in heritage-related organisations across the UK and abroad, including:
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-The National Trust
-York Archaeological Trust
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Heritage consultancies
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-York Civic Trust
-The Science Museum Group
-The Royal Mint Museum
-Heritage Malta
-New South Wales Government
-Highland Council

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Training for careers in heritage conservation. If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Read more
Training for careers in heritage conservation

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in a career in heritage or historic building conservation, the Conservation Studies course at York gives you the theoretical knowledge and practical, hands-on experience you will need for a professional role in the sector. Established in 1972, the course was the first of its kind in the UK, and has developed an international reputation for producing highly skilled and knowledgeable conservation practitioners.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build relationships with conservation specialists and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

The University also validates the MSc in Building Conservation and Timber Building Conservation at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in Sussex, more details from the Weald & Downland Museum webpage.

What does the course at York cover?

The core of the MA in Conservation Studies covers the history and philosophy of historic environment conservation, and provides a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. Theoretical elements of the course are complemented by a wide choice of short ‘skills modules’, which focus on developing your knowledge of the specialist skills that are an essential part of professional practice.

By choosing a specific set of accredited modules, you can gain the more specialised MA in Conservations Studies (Historic Buildings), which is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). As such, it offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners working towards full professional membership of the IHBC.

Who is it for?

This course attracts a vibrant mix of UK and international students. These include graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history, and related subjects, as well as experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields. We welcome the diversity of our students’ backgrounds.

What can it lead to?

The course focuses on the knowledge and skills required for a wide range of careers in heritage conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust, Historic England, English Heritage and ICCROM to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies has a strong focus on enhancing employability and professional development with a valuable combination of practical skills and theoretical understanding. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge, improving your chances of employment as a heritage-conservation practitioner.
-Developed intellectually and personally through direct engagement with conservation professionals and specialists.
-Developed the ability to work in a team through group working and placement experiences, and independently through research for your dissertation
-Received guidance on career opportunities in the conservation sector and the key networks for employment
-Worked alongside our Regional Heritage Skills Coordinator with the National Heritage Training Academy

Course postgraduates have gone on to careers in heritage conservation roles across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-INTACH (Indian National Trust)
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Chartered surveying
-Planning
-Business and administration
-Education
-International affairs
-Research

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Accredited training for building conservation professionals. The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. Read more
Accredited training for building conservation professionals

Why choose this course?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and offers a bespoke route for UK practitioners to achieve full professional membership of the IHBC. The programme conforms with the international ICOMOS Guidelines for Education and Training in Conservation.

Having run successfully for more than 40 years, the programme is now supported by a network of specialist conservation and research organisations locally, nationally and internationally. Contributors to the course include national experts from English Heritage, Council for British Archaeology, ICOMOS-UK, Historic Scotland, and the National Trust and from a large number of local conservation and heritage organisations.
-Understand historic and evolving practice in heritage building conservation.
-Gain vital work experience and learn practical, hands-on skills.
-Build working relationships with national and international conservation specialists and research organisations.
-Develop careers-focused knowledge, practical experience and contacts.
-Study in the heritage capital of Britain – be part of conservation in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, archives and libraries.
-Choose to study full-time over one year or part-time over two or three years.

What does the course cover?

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) covers the history, ethics and philosophy of historic environment conservation together with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in building conservation practice. It is complemented by training in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings. The practical ‘skills modules’ focus on specific aspects of professional practice, repair and conservation techniques, legislation and planning, policy, finance and managing conservation projects.

Who is it for?

This course attracts graduates in architecture, archaeology, history of art, architectural history and related subjects. It also appeals to experienced conservation practitioners from multi-disciplinary backgrounds, including architects, surveyors planners, conservators and practising craftsmen in various fields, who wish to advance their professional training.

What can it lead to?

The course provides the knowledge and practical skills required for a range of careers in historic building conservation and related fields. Recent students have gone on to employment with organisations ranging from the National Trust and English Heritage to building preservation trusts, local authority services, heritage consultancies and conservation practices.

Placement

The work placement module gives you a chance to gain practical experience of working in the professional heritage-conservation sector. The placement will draw on and develop the knowledge and experience gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new skills in conservation and heritage management, to enhance your employability and confidence in practice.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of conservation within a professional environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of conservation procedures and issues from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing the placement you should:
-Have gained knowledge and skills in evaluating historic buildings and environments, and be able to advise on their conservation requirements.
-Have an understanding of the practical applications of conservation principles and ethics.
-Be able to critically reflect on the issues raised in the core conservation modules through your work experience.

Careers

The MA in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) focuses on enhancing students’ employability and professional development with a combination of practical skills training and theoretical teaching. By the end of the course you will have:
-Enhanced your skills and knowledge so that your chances of employment as a conservation professional are improved.
-Developed both intellectually and personally as a result of having dealt directly with conservation professionals and completed a sustained independent research project.
-Developed the ability to work both within a group through seminar and placement experiences, and independently through research for a dissertation.

The accredited training provided by this course has led postgraduates into varied careers in historic building conservation across the UK, for organisations including:
-English Heritage
-Historic Scotland
-The National Trust
-Building Preservation Trusts
-Local authority conservation services in England and Scotland
-National Parks
-The Council for British Archaeology
-Architectural practices and heritage consultancies
-Traditional building conservation craft businesses

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The world needs better politics. better ways of resolving conflicts and distributing resources more efficiently and equitably. Read more
The world needs better politics: better ways of resolving conflicts and distributing resources more efficiently and equitably. How do we improve policy and forge an effective international system when our traditions of political participation are local and national? The politics of the future is encumbered by the problems of the past.

This interdisciplinary MA seeks to address these problems by bringing together politics and contemporary history, with a particular focus on transnational ideas and institutions. Since the history of international politics has been shaped by longstanding, path-dependent effects, an understanding of contemporary history must underpin national and international public policy decisionmaking. This MA investigates the immediacy of present day politics and the collective memory of politics in the past, its successes and failures.

Programme of study

The programme consists of 180 credits: four taught modules (20 credits each), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits).

In the Autumn Term (from mid-October to mid-December) you will take an interdisciplinary Core Module, The Making of the Contemporary World: History, Politics and Ideas since 1945, and a single-discipline Option Module from either department. All students follow a Research Training module across the Autumn and Spring Terms.

In the Spring Term (January to mid-March) you take two single-discipline Option Modules, and undertake preliminary scoping work for your dissertation. All students follow a Research Training module across the Autumn and Spring Terms.

During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year.

Research expertise at York

Staff in the History department are engaged in world-leading research in international and transnational history, with particular expertise in the history of the British Empire, American History, and History and Policy.

In Politics, staff members have produced world-class research in international political economy, international political theory, the politics of development, comparative European politics, international security, Indian politics, African politics, and global governance.

There are also numerous centres and institutes at York that offer seminars, workshops and conferences, including the Centre for Global Health Histories, the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit, the Centre for Applied Human Rights, and the Centre for the Evolution of Global Business and Institutions. The activities of these centres will inspire you and create new opportunities for advanced research after the MA programme.

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Combines the study of criminology with advanced training in social research methods. Take a sociological look at the nature and causes of crime. Read more
Combines the study of criminology with advanced training in social research methods.

Overview

Take a sociological look at the nature and causes of crime. With this degree, you'll learn how to analyse a wide range of data to examine the motivations behind why people commit crime and how societies attempt to control them.

Course content

In this course, you will analyse crime, deviance and social control and conduct research to examine their impact on society.

In the criminology modules, you'll gain a deeper understanding of why some people are motivated to offend and how this behaviour can shape our communities and our responses to crime.

In the social research methods modules, you will develop practical skills and techniques in qualitative and quantitative research.

Modules
This degree includes three criminology modules and three social research modules:
-Advances in Criminological Theory
-Critical Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System
-Law and Social Control
-Qualitative Methods
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis
-Advanced Methods in Social Research

Careers

In addition to preparing you for doctoral study, a criminology and sociology degree like our MA in Criminology and Social Research can lead to a wide variety of careers in the fields of crime and justice. The mix of practical and analytical skills you'll acquire will position you competitively for jobs in this popular field.

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