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University of Manchester, Full Time MA Degrees

We have 59 University of Manchester, Full Time MA Degrees

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Would you like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography?. Are you considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes?. Read more
  • Would you like to acquire research skills in both anthropology and ethnography?
  • Are you considering moving on to doctoral and research degree programmes?
  • Do you want a course that is part of the North West Doctoral Training College (NWDTC)?

This programme is designed to prepare students to carry out doctoral level research in Social Anthropology. It provides training in a wide range of research methods and teaches students how to develop a substantive research project in a theoretically and methodologically informed way. Although primarily intended as preliminary to doctoral research, the MA Anthropological Research programme is also available as a stand-alone taught MA degree for people who wish to improve their social research skills and gain an in-depth understanding of ethnographic methods and approaches.

Students on the MA Anthropological Research work closely with an expert supervisor in Social Anthropology, with further guidance from a second supervisor. All students attend the following core course units: Issues in Ethnographic Research I and II, Postgraduate Research Seminar, Independent Theoretical and Ethnographic Analysis I, and Introduction to Quantitative Methods. In consultation with their supervisor they also select three short, 5 credit modules in qualitative or quantitative research methods. Computer training is also available. Students then select two specialist course units, of which one must be within Social Anthropology (options vary from year to year) and one may be elsewhere in the University.

Contact:

Programme Director: Dr Soumhya Venkatesan

Tel: 0161 275 3917

Email: 

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Under the guidance of their supervisors, students are required to complete eight course units and a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation which is, in effect, a doctoral fieldwork research proposal. This is prepared over the summer period and presented in September. Most course units, including the postgraduate research seminar, are assessed by essays of up to 4,000 words. Some units also involve assessment of presentations and practical work.

Facilities

Social Anthropology, and the School of Social Sciences of which it is part, are based in a modern building which allows 24/7 access.

There is shared workspace available for research students within Social Anthropology including networked computers and printing facilities. There are also many work areas elsewhere in the building and in the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

In keeping with the main purpose of the MAAR as a research-training masters, many graduates successfully proceed to undertake PhD studies, whether in Manchester or elsewhere. The MAAR is also an excellent programme in which to acquire skills in social research methods, especially the ethnographic methods that are fast becoming popular in the business, voluntary and educational sectors as a way to find out about how people engage with their everyday worlds.



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Why choose this course. -You want to be taught by lecturers at the cutting edge of international research in social archaeology. -You enjoy working in small groups to explore current 'hot topics' and exciting new debates. Read more
Why choose this course:
-You want to be taught by lecturers at the cutting edge of international research in social archaeology
-You enjoy working in small groups to explore current 'hot topics' and exciting new debates
-You are looking for state-of-the art research training that will prepare you for a PhD and develop transferrable skills

Archaeology at Manchester is internationally recognised as a centre for social archaeology. The MA in Archaeology thus facilitates a fascinating journey into the material and social world of past human societies. By combining theory with practice, we are able to ask fundamental questions about the complex web of inter-relationships between societies, individuals, animals and plants, the built environment as well as the material world. This socially-focused approach also encourages a critical and self-reflective attitude towards the politics and practice of archaeology today. Working at the forefront of knowledge and interpretation, the MA brings together researchers of international calibre with specialization in a wide range of geographical areas and chronological periods, and thus offers a unique and stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

This MA programme fosters strong student-led research. By encouraging you to propose your own essay, presentation and dissertation topics, the MA allows you to pursue your specific archaeological interests throughout all our modules.

The MA in Archaeology will appeal to:
-Those wishing to explore the following themes: history, theory and practice of archaeology; the archaeology of cultural identity; landscape, monuments and architecture; technology and society; death and the body; archaeological heritage and the contemporary significance of the past.
-Those interested in the following geographical areas or chronological periods: Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Iron Age Britain, Neolithic and Bronze Age Near East, Cyprus and Greece, Africa, Pacific and historical/colonial archaeology, as well as the role of the past in contemporary societies.
-Those whose first degree was in a related discipline (eg Anthropology, Museology, History of Art, History) and now wish to take a postgraduate degree in Archaeology in order to gain a solid grounding in the discipline.
-Those who have a first degree in Archaeology (single or joint honours) who wish to advance their knowledge, understanding and skills in an exciting research led environment at the forefront of new developments and discoveries.

Aims

The Programme aims are to:
-Enable you to develop their understanding of the interrelationship between archaeological theory, interpretation and practice
-Provide you with an overview of a range of theoretical approaches to artefacts, architecture and landscape, and encourage you to explore these in relation to specific case studies
-Encourage you to develop their critical skills concerning inference and interpretation
-Encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the contemporary social and political context of archaeology
-Enhance and amplify previously acquired disciplinary and transferable skills
-Enable you to undertake self-critical original research (through the MA dissertation)

Coursework and assessment

In addition to the compulsory core module `Archaeologies of the Past, Present and Future', students take three option course units and complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation. Most teaching will take place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work. Assessment is both formative and summative. Most courses are summatively assessed by a 6,000-word essay. Oral presentations, poster presentations, self-reflective learning reports and assessed group work may also be used and additional formative feedback is given throughout.

Career opportunities

In addition to subject-specific content and approaches, this Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills that are appreciated by employers in all walks of life. Pursuing this degree thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. This MA provides an excellent vocational foundation for those wishing to pursue a career in archaeology or hoping to embark upon a research degree, but is also a great general degree that teaches a diverse range of transferable skills highly sought after by employers, such as critical thinking, oral presentation, and team work.

Recent graduates have gone on to PhDs in Archaeology, to working in Archaeological Units, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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MA Architecture and Urbanism allows you to study, and conduct in-depth research into, the influence of global cultural and economic forces on contemporary cities. Read more

MA Architecture and Urbanism allows you to study, and conduct in-depth research into, the influence of global cultural and economic forces on contemporary cities.

Throughout the course, you will explore the design, functioning and future of urban situations in written, drawn and modelled work that builds on the legacy of twentieth century urban theory and is directed towards the development of sustainable cities.

The course is therefore perfect preparation for careers in roles associated with the development of sustainable urban spaces. What's more, in certain circumstances, this course can be approved as prior learning for the MSA Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 accredited MArch Architecture.

This course is jointly accredited by The University of Manchester (UoM) and Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), with cross-disciplinary connections between UoM's School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED), and MMU's Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design. You will therefore benefit from the input of two leading institutions in architecture teaching and research.

Find out more at the MSA website .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas. Read more

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Special features

Work Placement (Semesters 1 and 2)

One of the most popular aspects of the AGMS is the work placement that you undertake in a museum or gallery. Each placement involves a minimum of 20 days work on a specific project, such as exhibition development, collections management, or education programme. Many students find this such a positive experience that they carry on working in their museum when the work placement has finished, and each year a few students are offered jobs by their placement hosts. Work placements start in Semester 1 (November/December) and finish in Semester 2 (June).

You can take the work placement either as 15-credit or 30-credit course.

During the MA, students have opportunities to design and participate in live projects with cultural organisations in Manchester. These include curating a collection, developing exhibitions, producing cultural events and working on creative collaborative projects.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Postgraduate life in the Centre for Museology

Both the Centre for Museology and the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures host a varied programme of activities and events for postgraduate students, including occasional master classes and workshops, as well as our regular calendar of:

  • Museology research seminars
  • 'Showcase' seminars at the Manchester Museum
  • Institute for Cultural Practices events
  • Research forum for PhD students

Full-time or part-time?

The AGMS MA is available as a 1 year Full-time or a 2 year Part-time course. We particularly welcome part-time students and there are many advantages in combining study with work practice, whether you already have a museum post, or are just setting out on your career. Each year, a number of mid-career professionals take the MA degree on a part-time basis and find that the University provides a valuable space for reflection as well as for further learning. Part time students have classes one day per week (usually Tuesday or Thursday; although in Semester 2 it might be a different day depending on the option course you choose). On this one should also add our Thursday 5pm research, professional practice and academic skills workshops. You should also count time for library work/fieldwork that may require you coming to Manchester and although sometimes this can be done on the day of teaching, often one needs to come in a second day (and if you do this on Thursdays then you can combine it with the 5pm workshops). When the work placement kicks off (about November/December in Year 1 or Year 2) you should also count one more day/week (on average) at the Work Placement institution (which, if appropriate or relevant, can be the organisation where you currently work; but undertaking a project different to your day-to-day work) - this is of course if you decide to take the Work Placement module.



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The MA in Arts Management, Policy and Practice enables students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the history, theory and practice of arts management; to gain an insight into the range of professional opportunities in the creative and cultural sector; and to acquire direct experience of the many areas of arts management. Read more

The MA in Arts Management, Policy and Practice enables students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the history, theory and practice of arts management; to gain an insight into the range of professional opportunities in the creative and cultural sector; and to acquire direct experience of the many areas of arts management. The programme has a strong practical, hands-on element. At the same time it offers a solid theoretical grounding, exploring cultural policy in its historical context and encouraging critical engagement with the philosophical, political, social and economic imperatives informing contemporary practice. Above all, we aim to produce pioneers rather than bureaucrats.

Lecturers from the Centre for Arts Management teach the MA with considerable input from arts professionals including staff from the Martin Harris Centre, Contact Theatre, the Royal Exchange, Whitworth Art Gallery and many other local cultural organisations. We also work closely with our sister programme, the highly regarded MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies.

Aims

The programme is designed to serve as an entry-level qualification for recent graduates as well as offering professional development for mid-career practitioners. It offers flexibility and opportunities for specialisation, while ensuring a thorough grounding in essential principles and methodology. It provides a solid foundation for careers in different areas of the arts and creative industries, and caters for arts practitioners as well as aspiring managers.

Special features

The siting of the programme close to a range of leading arts venues offers a unique opportunity for students to engage with the practical considerations of arts management. The Martin Harris Centre is a hub of cutting edge research and interdisciplinary investigation: in addition to the Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall and John Thaw Theatre, it is home to the Tipp Centre (Theatre in Prisons and Probation), the Centre for Screen Studies, Centre for Applied Theatre Research, Manchester Theatre in Sound (MANTIS), Manchester Centre for Music in Culture (MC2), and the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound-Art. Other cultural organisations based at the university - Manchester Academy, Contact Theatre, Manchester Museum and the Whitworth Art Gallery - are only a few minutes' walk away.

The programme also benefits from the exceptionally rich grouping of arts-based institutions and agencies in Manchester and the North West - an area celebrated for containing more theatres than any other region outside London and now hosting the BBC at the new Media City at Salford Quays. Liverpool (European Capital of Culture 2008), Leeds and Sheffield are all within easy reach. A wide range of regional arts venues and organisations contribute to the programme by providing guest lecturers, site visits and work placements.

The programme is based within the School or Arts, Languages and Cultures. The core of the School's interest is the field of human cultures, beliefs and institutions. Its work embraces the material, visual, creative and performative dimensions of culture, and as such fosters a rich interdisciplinary culture led by world-renowned scholars with a diversity of expertise, from analysts to creative artists, from historians of ideas to cultural theorists. We work particularly closely with staff from the highly-rated departments of Music and Drama.

Coursework and assessment

All students take two core modules (Arts Management: Principles and Practice, and Cultural Policy) and write a dissertation (15,000 words, or for a practice-based dissertation 8,000-10,000 words plus project documentation). The remaining credits (two or three additional modules) are taken from a range of options including:

  • Work Placement in an arts organisation
  • Business Strategies for the Arts (Marketing, Finance and Business Planning)
  • Creative Learning: Arts, Heritage and Education
  • Professional Practice Live Project
  • Subject to availability, modules may also be selected from the MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies or from elsewhere in the school.

All modules include a programme of guest lectures and/or practical seminars by experienced professionals based in cultural institutions in and around Manchester. The programme also features visits to a selection of key sites and venues in the North West.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This programme prepares graduates for a diverse range of career opportunities as managers, administrators, policy-makers or practitioners in various branches of the arts and cultural and creative industries. Opportunities exist in the public, private, and voluntary sectors; in theatres, opera houses, concert halls, arts centres, museums and galleries, and the media; with orchestras, theatre companies, dance companies, etc.; or with the Arts Council, British Council, Local Authority, Tourist Board and various funding bodies. Discrete posts include: programming manager; marketing director; education director; development or outreach officer; tour organiser; promoter, agent or artist's manager; website, database or IT manager; producer; consultant or market researcher; fundraiser; community artist; freelance workshop leader. Graduates may also find work in related areas such as teaching, social and educational work. Some students go on to pursue further study and research at doctoral level.



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The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. Read more

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.

ii. understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.

iii. be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.

iv. be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.

v. work effectively as autonomous scholars.

vi. be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units.  If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Course unit details

Course units vary from year to year, depending on staff availability and student enrolment, but you will find below details of the units which we are currently planning to offer in 2017/18. (If you are planning to take the MA part-time, over two years, please note that we cannot guarantee that all of these courses will definitely run in 2018/19: if you are particularly keen to take a specific course, you are advised to discuss your plans with the Programme Director: Dr. Jenny Bryan ( ).

Please note that we are also planning to offer a new 15-credit course in 2017/18: 'Approaching Women in Greek Tragedy': further details will be available here soon.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.



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The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. Read more

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. All our interpreting trainers are practising conference interpreters in language combinations that reflect market demands. Most trainers are also AIIC members. For a detailed list of regular and visiting trainers and their professional backgrounds, please visit: http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/translation-and-intercultural-studies/about/people/external-trainers/

The programme offers simultaneous and consecutive interpreting training in five languages - French, German, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. These are key languages in international organisations such as the UN and EU and are also in demand on the freelance market.

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting can be studied over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time). Part-time study is strongly supported and is actively facilitated in the timetabling of teaching hours for the MA, wherever possible.

Postgraduate Diploma   (PG Dip)

The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Conference Interpreting is a slightly shorter course available for students who do not wish to complete a professional portfolio or research dissertation.

Two distinct conference interpreter profiles

As a prospective student, you will offer one of two profiles, reflecting the two distinct profiles of practising conference interpreters:

  • Profile 1: You have English as your native language (A language) and two passive foreign languages (C languages). You will be trained in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting out of both C languages into your A language
  • Profile 2: You have Russian, Chinese, French, German or Spanish as your native language (A language) and English as an active foreign language (B language) or English as your A language and one of the five languages mentioned as your B. You will be trained in both types of interpreting in both directions (i.e. B-A and A-B)

Why Manchester?

The University of Manchester's MA/PG Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to offer intensive training to enable students to develop the necessary skills for a career as a professional conference interpreter. Class sizes are kept small, to ensure that students can receive individualised feedback. This in turn enables students to progress at their own pace. Students develop their interpreting skills under the guidance of a core team of interpreter trainers - all of whom have worked for international organisations such as the EU or UN, either as staff or on a freelance basis. In addition, students attend professional skills master classes, in which visiting conference interpreters and potential employers offer insights into the profession.

We have two interpreting suites equipped with 12 booths and Brähler consoles used widely in the profession.

Internationally recognised

The course design reflects best practice criteria set out by the internationally recognised professional body for conference interpreters, AIIC (the International Association of Conference Interpreters). It includes a module specifically focused on professional development, allowing students to focus on the contexts in which they can expect to work as conference interpreters. To ensure that students have an understanding of the dynamics of interpreting in multilingual meetings, simulated conferences are run during the second semester, during which interpretation is provided from several languages. Students considering a career in research benefit from MACINT's location within the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies - with staff research interests ranging from translation and conflict to the interpreting profession.

We strive to keep our course up-to-date with the latest developments in the profession and to find ways to make our course as useful and relevant as possible. To that end in 2015 we introduced the following exciting changes:

Additional simultaneous training

We now offer a four-week advanced simultaneous training course to MA students following their final exams. The aim is to give students a further opportunity to bring the standard of their interpreting up to the level required of professional conference interpreters. After the training, students wishing to complete the MA will produce a piece of written work outlining their preparation for a hypothetical interpreting assignment. Students will be encouraged to pick a meeting for which webcasts and documentation are available online, prepare, and then test the effectiveness of their preparation by having a go interpreting from the webcast.

For an additional fee, PG Dip students and graduates from other universities can attend this extra training period if the relevant language groups are running.

Subject-specific training to enhance background knowledge

A new module was introduced to increase students' knowledge of subject-matter that they are likely to encounter as interpreters. This includes the workings of major international organisations (e.g. EU, UN), diplomacy, international law, economics and foreign policy.

Additional language

Students taking the postgraduate diploma will be offered an opportunity, as part of their course, to work on a new or existing language by enrolling on one of the university's language courses.

For recent updates on our activities please visit our Facebook page  or find us on Weibo.  

Aims

  • To equip students with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills for a career in conference interpreting
  • To provide specialist training in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
  • To provide a gradual transition into the professional world through practical, real-life interpreting tasks
  • To provide guidance on professional conduct and ethics
  • To enable students to reflect critically on their own and others' interpreting practice
  • To equip students for further study and research
  • For further information about the course, you can email  or  .


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The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials. Read more

The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials.

Writers may choose to work on writing a novel and/or short stories and/or poems.

All students will have the opportunity to attend weekly workshops and masterclasses taught by Professor Jeanette Winterson.

More information about this programme can be found on the Centre for New Writing website .

Please note that both the full and part-time options are taught between 9am to 5pm. We do not offer evening classes. 

Coursework and assessment

Students take 60 credits worth of courses in semester one and 60 credits worth of courses in semester two. To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total;

  • All poetry and fiction writing workshops meet for two hours per week, and are worth 30 credits. Students will also be offered three individual half-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing. Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio of poetry or fiction.
  • Seminars also meet for two hours per week and are also worth 30 credits. They will usually be assessed by one 6,000 word essay or the equivalent.
  • Over the summer students complete a 15,000 word 'dissertation' which consists of a group of poems, a selection or short stories, or an extract from a novel. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In semester one, students may choose to take two workshops - one in fiction writing and one in poetry -- or they may take one workshop and one seminar - typical seminars will be 'The Art of Short Fiction' and 'Poetics'.

In semester two students wishing to focus on poetry writing will take a poetry workshop and a seminar on Contemporary Poetry; students wishing to focus on fiction writing will take a fiction writing workshop and a seminar in Contemporary Fiction.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Some of our students will go on (sometimes several years after completing their studies) to become published writers but most will not. The primary purpose of the Creative Writing MA in Manchester is therefore not to produce published writers but to help writers fulfil their potential and to help them understand and enjoy the literary traditions within which they are working. Graduates may go on to work in publishing, journalism, Arts administration, or (perhaps via a PhD programme) into university teaching.



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The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation. Read more

The MA Criminology allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the current trends and historical debates surrounding crime causation, crime control and regulation.

This innovative, interdisciplinary course is taught by experts from sociological, legal and psychological backgrounds with real-world experience. You will benefit from research-led teaching as well as strong links to wider criminal justice professions and industry.

Whether you are a recent graduate, or a practitioner or professional already working in the criminal justice field, this course will enable you to gain a critical understanding of contemporary criminological and socio-legal issues and engage with a diverse range of methods used to research them.

Aims

Aims of the course:

  • Develop students' intellectual, critical and analytic skills in the academic areas of criminology and criminal justice.
  • Produce graduates who have a thorough understanding of the key theoretical and political positions and concepts within criminology and criminal justice and the ability to use this knowledge in sophisticated ways in the critical assessment and development of public policy and interventions.
  • Provide students with the opportunity to explore, through a range of optional courses, particular areas of study that are either professionally relevant or of academic interest.
  • Provide students quantitative and qualitative research method skills in a way that is consistent with the demands of the discipline and the professional market.
  • Develop in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary studies as the only way to confront the complexity of our object of study, an interest in the applied dimension of scientific knowledge and the awareness of the ethical implications of the scientific criminological project.
  • Enhance students' transferable skills including proficiency in oral and written communication; the capacity for independent learning; the ability to reflect about the ethical and ideological components of their work; and the capacity for working co-operatively with others to produce professional outputs in a timely fashion.
  • Develop criminological knowledge and research skills for the writing of a Masters-level dissertation.

Special features

On successful completion of the course, students will have:

  • demonstrated a critical awareness of the functioning and goals of the different institutions and agencies that comprise the criminal justice field in the English criminal justice system, the existing research on what works and the interrelationship between different forms of social control;
  • demonstrated a conceptual grasp of the different theoretical perspectives on crime, deviance and criminal justice, as well as specific areas of criminological research (e.g., interpersonal violence), and the capacity to critically evaluate theoretical developments in these areas;
  • developed an appreciation for the ethical and ideological dimensions of crime control and criminological research and the links between crime control and public policy;
  • recognised the methodological problems involved in the design and conduct of research and will have demonstrated knowledge of the main measurement strategies and data sources relevant to criminology and criminal justice studies;
  • understood the assumptions and practical implications built into criminal justice and criminological positions and how they affect policy formation and research methodologies;
  • demonstrated a critical awareness of research issues and methodologies related to the fields of criminology and/or criminal justice, combined with a knowledge of corresponding skills in undertaking a piece of research commensurate with Masters'-level study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of a dissertation.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year).

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you must write a 12,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. Your dissertation must be within the area of one of the units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MA can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.



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MA Digital Technologies, Communication and Education is an award-winning course that uses digital technologies, the broadcast media and/or interpersonal, group or organisational communications techniques to enhance practice, research and the professional and academic development of educators in technology- and information-rich environments. Read more

MA Digital Technologies, Communication and Education is an award-winning course that uses digital technologies, the broadcast media and/or interpersonal, group or organisational communications techniques to enhance practice, research and the professional and academic development of educators in technology- and information-rich environments.

The course is offered in three modes, each starting in September.

  • full-time study in Manchester lasting 12 months
  • part-time study in Manchester, which normally lasts around 27 months
  • part-time study at a distance, by e-learning over two or three years.

Aims

  • Further your career by improving your skills and knowledge base in the area of digital technologies and communication, in order that these can be applied in any educational setting.
  • Enhance your interpersonal and group communications skills in order to learn independently and make effective decisions through self-reflection on your own practice.
  • Develop the ability to design your own educational materials using digital technologies and in particular to develop creative and innovative approaches to this work.
  • Build your confidence and ability to identify and critically evaluate the use of digital technologies, whether in formal educational settings or the informal educational processes of society, and with specific reference to your own needs and practice.
  • Develop your ability to systematically understand and critically evaluate research and research methodologies relevant to digital technologies in education, and apply this knowledge in actual research projects.
  • Develop an ability to manage and understand rapid technological change and its effect on educational processes, institutions and policies.

Teaching and learning

Formalised lectures are rare. Instead, classes tend to mix lecturer input with group work, computer and video activities, simulations, problem-based learning and class discussions. We make considerable use of enquiry-based learning (EBL), encouraging students' critical reflection on their own practice and beliefs: formed both by their professional experiences and intuitions, and theory and research. We encourage both individual and co-operative learning and research and hope to foster an ethos of life-long-learning. As most of our participants are themselves experienced teachers, we appreciate the wealth of knowledge and practical experience that they bring to the course and we encourage all participants to use all sources of professional insights including their fellow participants. We provide training in the use of electronic databases, library resources, and computer based statistics packages. Many other key skills will be developed during the course.

Coursework and assessment

The form of the assessment varies from unit to unit, including:

  • practical project work, i.e. creation of a web site or other educational software
  • a written literature review or other essay of approximately 3,500 words
  • criticism of existing software, web sites etc.
  • creation of a teaching portfolio
  • writing reports on schools or other educational settings
  • collaborative group work.

For dissertations, you can choose between a Mode A (traditional type) or a Mode B (portfolio type) dissertation. Mode A dissertations report on a research project of your own design or, possibly, discuss or develop theoretical understanding relevant to the field and/or your professional development. Mode B dissertations are more practical, and involve you designing, testing and implementing a technological solution to an educational problem, for example, a website or piece of interactive multimedia, and then reporting on this process. Mode A dissertations are 15,000 - 20,000 words long - the length of Mode B work can be negotiated, but the overall workload is expected to be equivalent to that of a Mode A.

Course unit details

The MA is a modular course carrying 180 points. It is divided into a taught component of 120 credits (subdivided into eight course units of 15 credits) and a dissertation of 60 credits. The taught component must be successfully completed before the dissertation can be submitted.

The course is semesterised. For on-site participants, this involves Semester 1 (late September - late January), Semester 2 (February-mid-June), and, for full-time participants, a summer semester (mid June - early September) for the dissertation. Part-time participants, whether studying in Manchester or at a distance by e-learning, follow the same teaching semesters as full-time participants but with a lighter study load in each. Their dissertations can then be completed over a longer period and submitted in either April or September.

Each 15-credit course unit is normally taught in one semester either through face-to-face classes or through various types of distance/e-learning. Except where noted, all courses exist in both a face-to-face and distance version. It is possible for students to complete the degree by a mixture of face-to-face and distance methods, if this is desired. Each 15-credit course unit is designed to fill 150 hours of study time. This time includes both set activities/classes, independent study, and work on assessment projects.

TESOL Pathway

Applicants may choose to specialise in a recognised area of Digital Technologies, and currently there is a TESOL pathway available. For further information, please contact  .

The degree that you would be awarded if you took this specialism would be called: MA DTCE (TESOL )

A pathway student must successfully complete a 15 credit core course specialising in language learning and technology; focus on their specialism and relevant research methods in the 30 credit unit Researching DTCE; and complete a 60 credit dissertation with a focus on TESOL and technology.

Additional fee information

We have planned the part-time distance/e-learning course so that completion within three calendar years is possible and we expect that most students will follow this schedule. However, we recognise that distance learning studies have to be accommodated within participants' busy personal and professional lives and sometimes unpredictable circumstances arise. In such cases, interruption of studies for up to a year is possible without any fee implications. In other cases a slower study pace can be arranged involving additional fee calculations please contact the  for details. Thus, there is a financial incentive to complete within three years.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Are you looking for a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles as well as quantitative methods?. Are you interested in how applied and policy-oriented research of economic data has relevance for real-world economists?. Read more
  • Are you looking for a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles as well as quantitative methods?
  • Are you interested in how applied and policy-oriented research of economic data has relevance for real-world economists?
  • Are you focused on a career after your masters or would like to meet the entry requirements of our more advanced MSc in Economics?

Manchester is a leading centre for economics and research-led teaching. Graduate students from across the globe come to study economics at Manchester, attracted by its first-class postgraduate training and supervision in the core and specialist areas of economics.

Many famous names from the world of economics have worked here at Manchester, including three Nobel Prize winners. Interdisciplinary study is also actively pursued here with many course units involving a number of different Schools at the university.

The Economics MA course is designed to meet the growing demand for those students who seek a degree that combines a solid training in microeconomic and macroeconomic principles with quantitative methods and research informed applied economics units.

This course is clearly different from the existing MSc Economics courses at Manchester because of its focus on mainstream but less theoretical units that need to be completed.

Students who choose the Economics MA will take compulsory courses in both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics; they will further advance their quantitative skills and techniques in the core courses in Introduction to Econometrics, Mathematical Methods in Economic Analysis and Further Econometrics; and, as part of their MA dissertation, they will focus on applied and/or policy-oriented research of economic data as relevant to policy makers and economics professionals.

The programme suits students who are interested in a career straight after the MA and not those students interested in postgraduate research. The latter group may find our MSc Economics more appropriate.

Aims

  • Provide instruction and rigorous training in economics and the relevant methods of mathematical economics and econometrics research in this area
  • Develop your powers of inquiry, critical analysis and logical thinking, and your ability to apply theoretical knowledge to current issues of policy and practice in economics
  • Encourage initiative, independent learning, awareness of analytical and theoretical approaches in the field of economics, exposure to recent research and the state-of-the-art tools in applied work in economics
  • Train you in research methods and core skills in microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics, mathematical economics, problem-solving, written and oral expression, communication and presentation skills
  • Equip you with the intellectual apparatus and practical skills necessary for an economist working in private or public organisations
  • Enable you to apply advanced research skills to a relevant research area either in economics, via course units and a dissertation

Special features

Quantitative methods preparation for the MA

1. Please visit our Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Economics website where you will find information about the minimum level of knowledge of mathematics and statistics that you should possess from your current or previous training.

2. On the same website, please look at the details and content of our Introduction course on Quantitative Methods in Economics which builds on the knowledge resumed in (1) and which is designed to equip you with further technical skills that you will require before starting the MSc. You are strongly advised to attend this course which is offered, free of charge. The course will run during induction week and we recommend that you spend some time between July 1 and September studying and familiarising yourself with the course material on the website, especially if you might not be able to attend the course. The significance of this course is illustrated by the fact that the obtained marks contribute 10% to the final marks of the Maths Methods and Econometrics compulsory units of semester 1.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The demand for economists continues to grow worldwide. This demand exists across a host of institutions ranging from the public sector (like universities, central banks, international organisations) to the private sector (commercial banks and insurance providers).

With the range of applied economics skills provided in the MA Economics students are perfectly place to seek a career in business and place themselves ahead of competition. At the same time this degree is ideal for students who seek further education via MSc-research degrees across the UK and the world.



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MA Education (International) will provide you with the opportunity to engage in structured study of, and reflection upon, the application of educational theories, ideas and concepts to a range of educational and community-based contexts. Read more

MA Education (International) will provide you with the opportunity to engage in structured study of, and reflection upon, the application of educational theories, ideas and concepts to a range of educational and community-based contexts.

The course, which has been designed for teachers and other education professionals working in a range of settings, is ideal if you're looking to develop your career by securing new posts or promotion. You'll work with a highly diverse and international cohort of students representing perspectives from throughout the globe.

It offers a unique combination of policy and practice-based perspectives on education, and is taught by outstanding, world-leading researchers who focus on the realities of professional practice using the social sciences.

Aims

  • Develop critical understanding of key concepts in educational theory in order to enable an informed analysis of educational practices.
  • Raise awareness of the influence of context upon education.
  • Develop students' professional knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to their prior and emerging professional interests.
  • To enable students to gain evaluative and analytical skills that will help them to critique education policy and practice.
  • Develop capacity to engage in research to inform and develop practice.

Special features

The course has been designed for teachers and other education professionals, working in a range of educational settings. It will provide you with the opportunity to engage in structured study of, and reflection upon, the application of educational theories, ideas and concepts to a range of educational and community-based contexts.

It offers a unique combination of policy and practice-based perspectives on education located within the educational and other related experiences. It is taught by world-leading researchers who focus on the realities of professional practice using the social sciences. Course participants typically study the course in order to develop their careers in education through securing new posts, or promotion, in educational and education-related institutions.

Aims:

  • Develop critical understanding of key concepts in educational theory in order to enable an informed analysis of educational practices.
  • Raise awareness of the influence of context upon education.
  • Develop students' professional knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to their prior and emerging professional interests.
  • To enable students to gain evaluative and analytical skills that will help them to critique education policy and practice.
  • Develop capacity to engage in research to inform and develop practice.

.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by world-leading researchers who focus on the realities of professional practice through using the social sciences. This includes Professor Mel Ainscow (an international expert in inclusive education), Professor Michael Apple (the world's leading critical educationalist), Steve Courtney (an expert on school restructuring, change and leadership), Professor Helen Gunter (known internationally for her work on policy and leadership), Professor David Hall (an expert in policy enactment and distributed leadership), Ruth McGinity (an expert on localised policymaking, change and leadership), Dr Susie Miles (known internationally for her specialist knowledge of inclusion and disability in developing country contexts), Professor Mel West (a leading expert in school improvement and school effectiveness).

The course units are delivered through lectures, tutorials, group-work, case-based approaches, and enquiry-based learning. Comprehensive training is provided in the use of electronic resources. We encourage both individual and co-operative learning and research and hope to foster an ethos of lifelong learning. We aim to build on the expertise of our students, many of whom are experienced teachers, and who bring with them a wealth of knowledge and practical experience from a wide range of different countries.

Coursework and assessment

You will study four course units in each semester, six of which are core and two are optional.

The form of the assessment varies, however most involve 3000 word written assessment - this may be in the form of an essay, a critical review of literature, or a research report. Formative and summative feedback is provided.

The dissertation is the report of an empirical research project investigation of an aspect of education, and is 15,000 words in length.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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MA Educational Leadership is ideal if you're an educational professional currently working in, or aspiring to work in, a leadership position. Read more

MA Educational Leadership is ideal if you're an educational professional currently working in, or aspiring to work in, a leadership position.

The course is taught by leading academics in the field of leadership, management, school effectiveness and improvement. Senior educational experts also contribute, including head teachers, inspectors, local authority officers and policy-makers.

Teaching encourages student participation, shared experiences and opportunities for practical application. Depending on your background and experience, you may find the approach rather different from your previous experiences of university.

Aims

  • Provide an overview of current theories/frameworks for examining education policy and practice from a leadership perspective
  • Develop your understanding of key leadership issues that influence teachers' performance in primary and secondary schools and other educational settings.
  • Enable colleagues at all levels within educational institutions to identify issues and develop appropriate strategies to generate and sustain school improvement.
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of practical approaches to school improvement and school effectiveness and of current theories, issues and debates in the field.
  • Develop a range of learning and transferrable skills which integrate current research and best practice in the areas of school leadership and school improvement applicable to different students on different programmes.

Special features

The programme is taught by leading academics in the field of leadership, management, school effectiveness and improvement. Senior educational experts also contribute, including head teachers, inspectors, local authority officers and policy-makers.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by world-leading researchers who focus on the realities of professional practice through using the social sciences. This includes Professor Mel Ainscow (an international expert in inclusive education), Professor Michael Apple (the world's leading critical educationalist), Steve Courtney (an expert on school restructuring, change and leadership), Professor Helen Gunter (known internationally for her work on policy and leadership), Professor David Hall (an expert in policy enactment and distributed leadership), Ruth McGinity (an expert on localised policymaking, change and leadership), Dr Susie Miles (known internationally for her specialist knowledge of inclusion and disability in developing country contexts), Professor Mel West (an international expert in school improvement and school effectiveness).

The course units are delivered through lectures, tutorials, group-work, case-based approaches, and enquiry-based learning, associated with school visits. Comprehensive training is provided in the use of electronic databases, library resources. We encourage both individual and co-operative learning and research and hope to foster an ethos of lifelong learning. We aim to build on the expertise of our students, many of whom are experienced leaders in education, and who bring with them a wealth of knowledge and practical experience from a wide range of different countries.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment for the full-time course is by 8 x 3000 word assignments and a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Course unit details

Typical course units include: Educational Leadership; Examining Educational Policy; Contemporary issue sin Educational Leadership and Policy Development; Research Methods in Education; Leading Educational Change and Development; International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion; Inclusive Education.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Over the past decade graduates of this course have returned to over 40 countries around the world. They have mainly either entered or returned to teaching, lecturing or educational administration, while others have proceeded to further advanced studies.



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The MA in English and American Studies prepares students for undertaking further research in the discipline, but it is also aimed at those who wish to broaden… Read more

The MA in English and American Studies prepares students for undertaking further research in the discipline, but it is also aimed at those who wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with English and American literature and culture. The structure of the MA is flexible, which means that you can choose to combine your interests in English and American culture, or you can choose to focus more exclusively on one or the other . The division of English, American Studies and Creative Writing at the University of Manchester provides a thriving environment, with its vibrant research culture, its close links to the Centre of New Writing, its involvement in the Manchester Literature Festival and its access to the world-class John Rylands research library.

While this MA offers you a range of exciting modules that are chronologically or geographically specific, all modules are informed by recent theoretical and historical developments that allow you to think about categories like `literature', `culture' and `history' in nuanced and fresh ways.

You can also choose 30 credits from our  MA Modern and Contemporary Literature (subject to availability) to further extend the scope of your study.

Teaching and learning

In your first semester, you will choose 2 of 3 core modules (30 credits each), which will lay the groundwork for your coursework as well as preparing you to think about your dissertation. The core modules address questions that are at the heart of literary and cultural studies, and will give you conceptual tools relevant to all of the modules offered in the second semester.

In the second semester, you will choose 4 out of 6 modules, each of which is weighted at 15 credits, allowing you the choice of a greater number of courses. You diversify your engagement with the field with these courses, each of which tackles a range of periods and literary/cultural productions. Some of the courses offer you the chance to engage with the holdings of the John Rylands Library. Each focuses on a body of work, or on a topic or critical question, situated in a particular context. Students with an interest in American Studies take 6 modules in total, including, in semester one, the core course 'American Studies: Theories, Methods, Practice' plus the choice of one of the other core courses (as listed above).

Finally, students will write a 15,000-word dissertation, worth 60 credits, supervised by an academic member of staff.

Coursework and assessment

Students are required to take 180 credits of units as listed above.

The list of units on offer will be updated annually. Students may also choose up to 30 credits worth of units from another MA programme in place of one of their optional units, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.

Students will also attend seminars on such topics as how to study at MA level, how to research and write a Master's thesis, and career options.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. Read more

The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. It caters for students wishing to enhance their artistic and professional careers as well as those seeking to prepare for doctoral study. The course provides opportunities for students who are relatively new to the subject area to establish a foundation in the discipline as well as those who wish to pursue further study. It prepares students for doctoral study and/or employment in film, screen media and creative industries, as well as those who wish to employ their knowledge of screen media and practice in educational, social and community settings.

The course thus builds on extensive links between the University of Manchester and professional contexts and communities in Manchester and the North West. It encourages the research and practice of film in academic and creative contexts, in particular with engagement in non-traditional and/or community sites, combining artistic and academic exploration with a focus on social responsibility, critique and transformation.

Programme Director: Dr Felicia Chan (  )

Teaching and learning

The MA Film Studies programme offers a solid foundation in theoretical and critical film studies, built on staff expertise and specialisms from form and theory to historical and cultural approaches to national cinemas to the politics of identity, gender and sexuality, and film music as well as practice, for students who may wish to pursue the discipline at postgraduate level for personal or professional development. It also offers opportunities for research and practice in aspects of and approaches to applied Film Studies, for students who may be interested in pursuing more practice-based and socially engaged research, for example, using film production and audio-visual methodologies for research, knowledge exchange and community engagement. This involves acquiring practical skills in addition to theoretical knowledge, such as documentary film-making, sound design, film curation and programming, that could be applied to education, community and activist contexts, as well as work placement opportunities.

Following a mandatory first semester of two core modules, students are free to construct their MA programme from a diverse range of options, including established study options within School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, a directed reading or practice option (enabling you to pursue a specific area of research with the careful supervision of specialist staff), and a work placement option. Study options vary from year to year depending on staff availability.

Students are taught in seminars, small group tutorials, workshops and surgeries, offering opportunities for lively and engaged discussions. One-to-one supervision is offered on all dissertations. Assessment is primarily by written assignment, also there will also be opportunities for those interested in practice as research.

Coursework and assessment

Written coursework in each taught 30 credit taught module is constituted by a 6,000 word essay, or its equivalent, constituted by a combination of various kinds of written work, including essays, log books, evaluation reports, project critiques and practice analysis. The dissertation is constituted by a 15,000 word project on a topic chosen in consultation with the dissertation supervisor.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This Masters degree teaches and develops a range of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a wide range of career options. Previous MA students have continued to take up PhD study with us, and many of these have gone on to academic and teaching careers in further and higher education institutions. Others have gone on to work for the BBC, in independent television production companies, festivals, film education and other areas of the film and screen media industry.



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