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Creative Arts & Design×

Oxford Brookes University, Full Time MA Degrees in Creative Arts & Design

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation. Read more
MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation.

This programme is enhanced by a group of internationally active sound artists, composers and field recordists who curate and participate in the activities of the SARU (Sonic Art Research Unit) and the annual festival Audiograft. The weekly Listening Group complements the core provision and introduces you to the vibrant research culture around Sound Arts.

You will develop individual and collaborative practice-based work in a stimulating environment that encourages dialogue and growth as part of a reflective community. This is a good basis for the intensive, fascinating and challenging work that thrives in this supportive, innovative and creative context.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers state-of-the-art technical facilities for Sound Arts and 24-hour studio access. This course is taught by leading Sound Arts practitioners creating ‘world-leading’ research as defined by the REF2014 (Research Excellence Framework). You will have access to expertise in sound art, field recording, electroacoustic composition, site-based practice, experimental composition and improvisation. Sound Arts is situated in an interdisicplinary context and you will work with students from Art & Design and Music.

The Sonic Art research Unit (SARU) and the annual ACE funded audiograft festival provide a stimulating environment for innovation and experimentation in your creative practice. Many of our Arts MA students progress to PhD study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include:
-Lectures and seminars held by staff on specialised topics.
-Team teaching in group seminars involving generic issues in research methodologies for practice based research.
-Feedback from staff during group feedback sessions, where staff make comments and provide you with constructive criticism and analysis of your work.
-Staff led group discussions arising out of your practical work presentations.
-Individual tutorials that address your individual research concerns.
-Specialised introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice based work.

Careers and professional development

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practicing sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow sound artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the sound artist and musician/composer in 21st century art practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/composition-and-sonic-art/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA Composition and Sonic Art is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, seven practice rooms including a band room (with PA and drum kit), an ensemble practice room and a drum room, two music studios, a music technology room and a research room for postgraduate students. Students also have access to pianos and practice areas elsewhere in the University.

Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all music students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

Music Technology and IT
The Music Technology room houses 12 PC workstations running Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project, alongside general internet, email and office software. Other computer networked facilities are also available.

The music studios are based in the basement of the Richard Hamilton Building. The facilities consist of two large single user electroacoustic studios, two sound proof booths; access to Adobe Audition; Pro-Tools; Cubase Studio and Logic; workstations running Pure Data; Max/MSP; Hyperprism; GRM Tools; CDP; a range of sound-recording equipment; along with the possibility of using the two studios together as separated recording and control rooms. One studio has a pair of Genelec 1037C Shielded Active Monitoring Speakers and the other studio has a pair of Genelec S30C Active Monitoring Speakers.

Sonic Art Research Unit Room
This is a space for postgraduate students and research staff engaged in Composition; Sonic Art; or Sound Art practices to use. There are two Apple Macs running Logic alongside a range of powered speakers, mixing desks; electronic components for the creation of bespoke devices; microphones for field and instrumental recording; and a range of digital recording devices.

Field trips

You are given the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their seocnd year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semster 2. In Year 2 they work through the summe ron their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practising sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts students have access to well equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam;or the Vilnius Art Academy.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - Mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising artists.

Many Contemporary Arts master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising artists whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within art galleries and museums; teaching further or higher education; new technologies; arts administration; arts and regeneration, conservation.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and music and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist and musician/composer in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts-and-music/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts-related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts and Music students have access to well-equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising cross artform practitioners.

Many Contemporary Arts and Music master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising cross artform practitioners and sound artists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within performance, festival management, new technologies; arts administration; arts and music teaching, arts for health, acoustic ecology, and as community cross artform activists.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
On the MA in Film Studies. Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Read more
On the MA in Film Studies: Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Through this course, you will build a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining academic and professional writing projects. We cover the history and theory of popular cinema in the US (classical and contemporary Hollywood), Europe and East Asia (especially Japanese cinema). Through modules on story development and research methods you will sharpen your writing skills in preparation for your dissertation project.

You will develop skills central to a career in either academia or the media industries. You will be taught by a diverse team of film specialists with different national and cultural backgrounds, as well as by industry professional guest speakers.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access. All Film Studies staff are active researchers publishing widely on subjects such as: Italian films and their audiences, puzzle films, film theory, film policy, film tourism, visual anthropology, and crime films.

You will have the opportunity to go on the annual field trip to the Cannes Film Festival. We have an advisory panel of film industry experts including leading directors, journalists, and producers and technical specialists who contribute to the programme and our annual series of Film Studies events, including an annual Careers Day. Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s premier cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, the Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Contemporary Music, and locally held Film Festivals.

You will be part of a stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in diverse areas from videogaming to modernism.

This course in detail

Compulsory modules - Students studying for the MA in Film Studies are required to complete the following two compulsory modules:
-Narration in Classical Hollywood Cinema
-Research Methods in Film

Optional modules - MA students can then choose any two of the options below:
-Popular European Cinema
-Professional Film Cultures
-Story Development
-Popular Cinema in East Asia
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is centred around film screenings, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of Story Development, intensive writing workshops.

Assessment activities include writing academic essays and a dissertation. Other assessments include professional writing activities - book reviews, feature articles, and screenplays.

Careers and professional development

Having a master's qualification helps you to stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the MA straight after graduating or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in the creative and media industries or to improve your current position. However, an MA in Film Studies can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including teaching, lecturing, publishing, arts administration, journalism, museum work, fundraising and higher education management.

The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA also open up wider opportunities in business and law. Many MA students continue onto further research and careers in academia, and our course provides the necessary research training required for doctoral work.

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The Creative Writing MA at Oxford Brookes will help your writing grow through work with established writers, industry professionals, teaching specialists and your peers, whilst you experience this most literary of cities. Read more
The Creative Writing MA at Oxford Brookes will help your writing grow through work with established writers, industry professionals, teaching specialists and your peers, whilst you experience this most literary of cities.

From the opening evening of your course – where previous speakers have included international bestseller Philip Pullman, Booker winner, Howard Jacobson and Pulitzer/Orange winner, Marilynne Robinson – through to the showcase for agents and publishers following your graduation, our aim is to make your time at Brookes a decisive stage in your development.

Your postgraduate study will centre on your own creative writing, combined with critical analysis, reflective commentary and scholarly research. The course can be studied full-time or part-time.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/creative-writing/

Why choose this course?

- The degree is led by our core staff of practicing and published creative writers/ academics and is also supported by a unique group of distinguished Creative Writing Fellows and guest speakers, including: Philip Pullman (author of internationally best selling trilogy, His Dark Materials) Sarah Dunant (bestselling author of Sacred Hearts) Kate Clanchy (winner of BBC National Short Story 2009 and first Oxford City Poet) James Meek (author of the Booker Prize long-listed, The People's Act of Love) Patience Agbabi (star performance poet and author of Bloodshot Monochrome and Telling Tales) Nick Cohen (star Observer journalist and bestselling author) John L Williams (literary talent spotter, novelist and freelance commissioning editor).

- Our Creative Writing Fellows do not merely visit occasionally. Between them, they lead a major workshop session every other week of each semester (on average) as well as other shorter sessions, resulting in a varied learning experience.

- Oxford has a vibrant literary community with many resident literary figures and publishing companies such as Oxford University Press, Blackwell Publishing, Taylor & Francis and Harcourt Education, based in the city.

- Cultural and literary events such as the Oxford Literary Festival take place throughout the year.

- Oxford has world-class libraries, such as the Bodleian, archives, collections and museums, including the Ashmolean, Pitt Rivers Museum and Modern Art Oxford.

Teaching and learning

A variety of teaching and learning methods are used across the course and all modules use more than one method. Methods include seminars, oral presentations and readings, workshops, visiting speakers, individual supervision, autonomous research and writing.

All modules are assessed by coursework (portfolios or pieces of work with a critical commentary) of about 6,000 words.

The Major Project of writing in any genre (with critical commentary) would normally be within the range of 15,000 to 20,000 words.

Specialist facilities

Our virtual learning portals provide core materials relating to learning and assessment online. These include lecture schedules, module guides, supporting materials, guidelines and criteria for coursework along with notes on essay writing and report presentation.

How this course helps you develop

During the course we help students foster links with publishers through a number of workshops run by publishing houses.

The Annual Creative Writing Showcase is a key event in the calendar where students are selected to present their work to publishers and agents. In 2012, Helen Eve was offered a two-book deal by Macmillan as a result of the event. See our other publishing successes

Careers

Many of our alumni have gone on to win literary prizes and have their own writing published.

A significant number of successful MA students continue into further research and careers in academia, either at Oxford Brookes or at other institutions.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Read more
The MA in Music offers advanced training in either musicology or composition. The modular structure allows students to pursue a broad generalist programme or to specialise in a particular area of their choice. Within the field of musicology, students can slant their studies towards one or several of the following: music in nineteenth-century culture, opera studies, popular music studies or film music. The composition pathway, meanwhile, provides a practice-based contemporary composition curriculum that encourages students to push the boundaries of their practice and develop a voice as an engaged and creative composer.

This course is unusual in combining a rigorous academic education with the opportunity to acquire vocational skills through our innovative Professional Experience module. Students take up work placements with a wide range of external arts organisations or undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. The course therefore offers rich opportunities for career development and can pave the way for further study at PhD level if so required.

Why choose this course?

-The flexible structure of the MA Music allows you to tailor the course to your particular interests. The course is one of very few Music MAs in the UK to offer professional experience as part of the course; you can undertake a work placement with an external organisation such as a radio station, opera house, museum, music publisher, magazine, concert promoter or school. Alternatively, you can undertake a project with one of our specialist research units. Recent students, for example, worked at the Handel-Hendrix House Museum, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Audiograft festival.

The course is taught by experts who are internationally renowned in their fields. Our research informs the content and methodology of our modules, ensuring that teaching is at the cutting edge of the discipline. Following REF 2014 Music has been singled out as an area of particular research strength within the University.Our staff disseminate their research to wider audiences via appearances on BBC Radio 3, articles in the national press and talks for major performing organisations. The activities of our research units in opera (OBERTO), popular music (PMRU), or sonic art (SARU) complement the programme of formal study. MA students can contribute to the research units' activities, for instance by participating in listening groups and helping to organise study days and conferences. Student composers have an opportunity to showcase their work through the annual Audiograft festival. Opera students go on a field trip to hear a live opera, usually in London.

Oxford is a fabulous city in which to study music, with a very lively concert scene and excellent research facilities. You will have access to the world-famous Bodleian Library and the new Brookes library also offers substantial collections centring on the specialist areas of the MA.

The course provides an excellent foundation for doctoral study for those who wish to continue into a career in academia.

This course in detail

Students studying for the MA/PG Dip in Music are required to complete the following compulsory modules* (30 credits):
-Research Skills and Applied Research
-Professional Experience

MA students are also required to complete the following (60 credits):
-Dissertation / Major Project

You will then take two of the following modules depending on your chosen specialism (30 credits each):
Composition Pathway
-Approaches to Experimental Composition and Sound Arts
-Electroacoustic and Live Electronic Composition

Musicology pathway
-Advanced Musicology 1: 19th-Century Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 1: Film Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2: Popular Music Studies
-Advanced Musicology 2:Opera Studies

*As our courses are reviewed regularly for quality assurance purposes, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

The MA in Music is taught through a combination of seminars, tutorials and skills-based workshops. Those taking a work placement will also receive mentoring and formative feedback from an individual at the placement organisation.

During your time here you will engage in lively discussions and original research. We aim to give you an in-depth understanding of recent critical debates, scholarship and practice in your chosen field, as well as to broaden your knowledge of musical repertoire.

Our pathways are original, exciting and flexible and one of the most striking features of the Music Department is its breadth of subject expertise. All staff members in Music are actively engaged in research and we have published our work in top journals and with the most highly respected publishers: our research in popular music, opera and sonic art was identified as 'world-leading' in the 2014 REF.

You will have an opportunity to work closely with staff members not only through the course modules but also through our specialist research units in popular music, opera and sonic art. Membership of these units allows you to attend conferences, workshops and talks by visiting speakers that will complement your formal studies.

Careers and professional development

Having an MA will make you stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the course straight after graduating from undergraduate study or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in music or to improve your current position. The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA in Music can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including management, law, journalism, media and the heritage industry.

Career destinations of our recent graduates include:
-Professional composition
-Performance
-Sound engineering
-Arts administration
-HE administration
-Teaching (secondary and FE)
-Retail management
-Youth work

Our programme provides the necessary research training for doctoral work and many MA students continue on into further research and pursue careers in academia. Our students have an excellent success rate in securing funded PhD places.

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