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Communication & Media Stud…×

University College London, Full Time MA Degrees in Communication & Media Studies

We have 5 University College London, Full Time MA Degrees in Communication & Media Studies

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This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the field of film studies. Linguistic and cultural expertise informs our teaching on the film-making traditions of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Southeast Asia.

Degree information

The programme covers the history of cinema and a wide variety of world cinemas. It is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both the history of cinema and its contemporary developments, and with the skills, concepts, methods and theories required for the study of cinema and media at graduate level.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), three options (90 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) and a research methodology module (not credit bearing).

Core modules
-Moving Images: Technology, Forms, Receptions
-Reading and Research Films

Optional modules
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Film Exhibition
-Genre in Italian Cinema
-Hollywood Genres
-How to Make an 8-Minute Documentary
-New Argentine Cinema
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme
-Political Cinema
-Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres
-Spanish Film
-The French New Wave
-The Idea of Documentary
-Theories and Practices of Film
-Global Cinemas
-Digital Media
-East and South Asian Cinemas

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and film and video screenings. The core courses are assessed by essays and examinations, which together count for 20% of the final mark. Optional courses are assessed by essays (40%), and the dissertation makes up the final 40%.

Careers

Graduates from the MA in Film Studies have pursued various careers, including: academic research and teaching; careers within media arts (writing, directing, editing); print and media journalism; arts and museum management; multimedia authoring and digital design; film preservation and curating.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, SOAS, University of London
-Communication Officer, Camera Lucida Productions
-Head of Development, Clcada Bellweather (CB Productions)
-Media and Film Studies Lecturer, City and Islington College
-Programme Assistant, ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

Employability
Former students of this programme have gone on to careers in education and publishing and a wide variety of careers in the media arts, including film production, festival programming, and film curation with organisations that include the BBC, the Barbican Centre, the Athens International Film Festival, and the London Film School.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Each year, we welcome students from all over the world to our Film Studies MA. Under the aegis of UCL's Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII), students spend a year amongst a thriving, cross-disciplinary community of cinema scholars and research students.

We have particular research strengths in film history, film theory, and in an exceptionally broad range of national and regional cinemas.

UCL has made a major commitment to refurbishing its multimedia infrastructure for the study of film and related media. This includes building a significant collection of print and visual materials and new facilities for teaching and for film and media screenings.

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The Translation MA is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL. Read more
The Translation MA is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL. Students benefit from a flexible programme of study that allows for various pathways and can include practical translation work involving particular language combinations, modules on electronic communication and translation technology, and more theoretical translation studies.

Degree information

The programme aims to develop an understanding of translation in its social, cultural and historical contexts, a grasp of the technological environment in which modern commercial and/or literary translating takes place, and, where applicable, practical translation skills involving selected language pairs. The final dissertation project provides an opportunity to produce an extended annotated translation showcasing students' translation interests and abilities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers several pathways. Each has one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time one year, part-time two years) is offered.

Core modules
-Translation Studies

Optional modules (indicative list):
-Advanced Translation including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish
-Digital Humanities modules
-Electronic Publishing modules
-Gender Studies
-Interpreting modules
-Linguistics modules
-Specialised Translation modules
-Translation and the Web
-Translation in History
-Translation Technology

Students may also choose options from across the Centre of Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry including African studies, comparative literature, European studies, gender studies

Dissertation/report
All students complete a 12,000-word dissertation consisting either of an annotated translation or of a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercices, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules is assessed by essay coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education.

First career destinations of recent graduates include:
-KPMG: Translator
-Prime Minister's Office: Translation
-Sage Publications: Account Manager Europe
-Codex Global: Junior Project Manager
-Platts: Senior Editor
-Morgan Stanley: Trading Analyst
-English Studio: Teacher
-Deloitte: Consultant
-Comms Multilingual: Sales Manager

Employability
The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; three graduates from 2012 have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets, taught by specialist translation staff with a divers range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.

UCL translation students are highly valued by the translation industry, with workshops and networking events organised during the year.

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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more
This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in.

Degree information

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of 1/2 core module(s) (45/60 credits), 2/3 optional /elective modules (30/45 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
-Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in Term One as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
-The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
-One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision.
-One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.
-An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities.

Dissertation/report
A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement
We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, we will offer all our students the opportunity to work on the collaborative film-making projects linked to MyStreet Films, such as the Doc in a Day workshops that have proved so successful.

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:
-Mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image.
-Film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers.
-Academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture.
-Marketing and research.
-Communication and other media.
-Archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability
The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within the Department of Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree will from 2017 provide three strands: the existing non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary will be joined by a 'Future Docs' strand (including VR and interactive documentary production).

Other admission requirements

Applicants with prior technical knowledge of film making are asked to send a video portfolio of up to 20’ duration (Vimeo link recommended). Applicants without a video portfolio are asked to complete a photo essay. Please see our guidelines on how to make a visual essay. You can submit either by post - a maximum of twenty 20cm x 25cm (8'x10”) stills – or by link to an external site.

All shortlisted applicants will be asked to submit a proposal for a film or video project - to consist of no more than four sides of A4, typed and double-spaced. This should include: an outline of what the film is about; the characters and other elements crucial to the narrative and the film structure/narrative. (You are not committed to the proposal for the final project.)

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The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. Read more
The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. The programme combines theory with practical opportunities for media production. Students will critically examine new developments within digital media and work with partners including the British Film Institute (BFI).

Degree information

This programme provides the opportunity to explore media education, media literacy and related fields. It combines theory with practical opportunities in moving image production, Internet cultures and game design. Students will critically examine developments in the fields of new media, including the impact of new technologies on education, and debates about the place and purpose of media in society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits) and an additional optional module (30 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Media, Cultural Theory and Education
-Internet Cultures: Theory & Practice

Recommended optional modules include:
-Moving Image Production
-Digital Games, Play and Creativity

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by face-to-face lectures and seminars, practical workshops combined with online-learning. Students are assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, plus practical work for some modules, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers in primary, secondary schools and further and higher education, while others have jobs as within areas related to digital media. Graduates can also be found working as museum and gallery education officers and in other informal learning spaces.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is run by UCL's London Knowledge Lab (LKL) where collaborating computer and social scientists research the future of learning with digital technologies in a wide range of settings. LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

Students are able to work with the BFI, our partner for one of our modules, as well as leading researchers from the DARE Collaborative, a research partnership focussed on the digital arts in education led by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and the BFI.

LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

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This MA prepares you for a career in the challenging world of publishing. Taught by experts and practitioners and with masterclasses from industry leaders, the programme of study includes all the knowledge, skills and understanding you need to become a successful publisher. Read more
This MA prepares you for a career in the challenging world of publishing. Taught by experts and practitioners and with masterclasses from industry leaders, the programme of study includes all the knowledge, skills and understanding you need to become a successful publisher.

Degree information

The programme equips students with both a practical insight into how this complex industry functions and a range of transferable skills. These include training in editorial, sales and marketing skills, publishing business plans and their successful delivery, contract negotiation and copyright management, production processes, digital contexts, innovation and entrepreneurship.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (120 credits), three optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years) is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years) is offered.

Core modules
-Author Management
-Publishing Contexts
-Publishing Entrepreneurship
-Publishing Skills
-Sales and Marketing

Optional modules
-Academic and Journals Publishing
-Illustrated Publishing
-Book Production
-Children's Publishing
-Theories of the Book
-Book Selling

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures and seminars, with an emphasis on practical skills and exercises based on real-world and team working. An essential component of the programme is the five-week placement in a publishing house. Assessment is through essays, presentations, reports, one unseen examination, and the dissertation.

Careers

At the end of the programme you will be a professional publisher ready to launch your career with a qualification from a university that the industry recognises and values.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Copyright Assistant, The Orion Publishing Group
-Digital Content Editor, Bloomsbury Publishing
-Marketing Assistant, The Random House Group
-Publishing Assistant, BMJ (British Medical Journal)
-Rights Assistant, Laurence King Publishing

Employability
UCL's MA in Publishing aims to help train leaders in the industry. We employ a rigorous applications process to ensure we recruit the very best potential publishers, and professional behaviour is at the heart of everything we do. This is an intensive programme, which provides access to the publishing industry throughout its duration, and we work with each student to give them the best support for their individual professional development. As a result, our graduates are sought-after recruits. Recent job successes have been in Bloomsbury Digital, Sage, and Penguin.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Publishing MA aims to cover the entire spread of publishing disciplines, from fiction and trade to professional, academic, scholarly and educational.

Teaching staff possess a wide range of book trade experience and networks of contacts across all fields in the UK and internationally. Their research has helped shape how publishers have developed practices, and made an impact on the discipline as a field of academic study.

In addition, leading publishers, literary agents, authors, legal experts, booksellers and electronic authorities visit to give lectures and presentations. Students benefit from masterclasses from industry leaders on current and controversial issues and field visits to retailers, publishers and libraries.

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