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Communication & Media Stud…×

Radboud University, Full Time MA Degrees in Communication & Media Studies

We have 2 Radboud University, Full Time MA Degrees in Communication & Media Studies

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more
This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives
Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions
Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:
- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences
- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy
- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

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This couse enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity. where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion. Read more
This couse enables you to understand a field that is buzzing with creativity: where art meets commerce, and where culture generates innovation and social cohesion.

What do your clothes say about your identity? Can an artist still break out without competing on a talent show? Should a city’s history and heritage be ‘repackaged’ to attract visitors? The creative industries are a fast-changing sector where the focus always seems to be on the tension between creativity and commerce. You may wonder how it could be otherwise, in a world where creativity has become a commodity. At Radboud University we address such questions.

In the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries, we focus on the artistic product. We look at, for example, the wonderful world where high fashion interacts with technological gadgets. Where tourists can discover a town’s cultural highlights with an app for a guide. Where television series are gaining ground on cinema. You will study our (post-)industrial society as a cultural phenomenon.

If you want to contribute to the development of a young, dynamic and steadily expanding creative sector, then this Master’s specialisation is for you.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

Why study Creative Industries at Radboud University?

- We approach the creative industries with a strong focus on culture as we put the creative object, product or process itself at the centre of the study. This emphasis makes our approach unique in the Netherlands.
- We look at diverse areas of the creative industry: including fashion, music, film and television, (social) media, tourism and education.
- We take a practical approach to this field by not only studying the big players, like global conglomerates but also studying small and medium enterprises.
- Our programme is hands-on, with assignments on a weekly basis challenging you to develop the ‘soft skills’ necessary to be successful in the labour market.
- We have close contacts with art and cultural organisations in and around Nijmegen. You can use these contacts to get a real taste of the industries you’re going to be working in.

Our approach to this field

The creative industries is a dynamic and complex field that changes rapidly due to globalisation and the continuous development of new and exciting technologies. At Radboud University we look at many areas of the creative industry, such as:

- Fashion: Fashion is a commercial, creative and cultural industry producing material objects like textile and garments, but also more conceptual products like trends, and beauty ideals. The glamour of fashion may lure us, but it is one of the most polluting industries. Currently, the field is characterized by incredible speed, rapid turnover, and high waste. In the future, can the fashion industry retain its glamour while becoming more sustainable?

- Media: The contemporary mediascape is dominated by global conglomerates with companies in various industries, such as film studios, sports and news channels, and game developers, to name a few. As a result, the industry has transformed into a cultural economy where only six ‘media giants', including Disney and Time Warner, control 90% of everything we read, watch and listen to. We will look at how the industry shapes both the form and the content of contemporary media productions.

- Tourism: The rise of mass tourism in the second part of the nineteenth century has been called the most important migratory movement in the history of mankind. We will study how art and culture are used to stimulate the tourist industry, and discuss the role of artists in the phenomenon. We examine renowned artists, as well as behind-the-scenes designers of sites, and tourists themselves.

- Education: Creativity and the so-called ‘21st Century Skills' in education are critical for contemporary post-industrial societies. Individuals are also becoming more driven to expand their cultural intellect; a factor that is sometimes used to promote educational goods and services. For examples, museums are becoming more interactive to help visitors understand the content better.

Career prospects

If you want to make a career in the intersection of art and commerce, then the Master’s specialisation in Creative Industries is the right choice for you.

- Skills
This Master’s will help you develop the reflective, inquisitive and critical attitude you need to succeed in this field, while closely looking at research methods and engaging in discussions currently surrounding these topics. You will familiarise yourself with policy papers, business plans, and gain advanced knowledge of the industries based on the creative product. You will also be able to assess future trends, especially where the industry is concerned. In short, you will have the skills you need to contribute to the development of the young and dynamic creative sector.

Job positions

The jobs you might find yourself doing have graduating from this programme are extremely varied. The terrain of creative industries is as diverse as it is large and it is constantly expanding. We therefore expect that there will be and more and more demand for people with expertise in the creative industries.

To give you an idea of possible jobs, here is a sample of jobs our graduates hold:
- Trend watcher for companies
- Consultant in art education for an educational organisation
- Consultant in ‘quality television’ for a national commercial television station
- Cultural policy-maker for the government
- Festival organiser
- Webmaster at a museum
- Programme organiser at a film festival

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/creativeindustries

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