• Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
  • St Mary’s University, Twickenham Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • New College of the Humanities Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
Cardiff×
0 miles

Full Time MA Degrees in Cardiff, United Kingdom

  • United Kingdom
  • Cardiff×
  • MA×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 73
Order by 
Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest. Read more
Examining military history in the Greek, Roman and Medieval worlds from a broad comparative perspective, this course enables you to explore themes across epochs, or focus on specific periods and topics of interest.

The first of its kind in the UK, the interdisciplinary MA in Ancient and Medieval Warfare offers archaeological, historical and literary approaches to the subject.

The course consists of a flexible combination of taught modules and individual research, which enables you to specialise in a specific period if you wish, or, if you prefer, to study a particular theme across a wider timespan.

The course provides a solid foundation of research skills which can serve as a basis for doctoral research, but it also provides transferable skills, which will be valuable for a career in any field.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the history and development of warfare in the Ancient and Medieval worlds
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches

Structure

The course can be completed in 1 year by full-time study or completed part-time over three years.

You take a mix of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits. On successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to your dissertation (60 credits).

You research and write a dissertation (20,000 words) on a topic or theme of your choice in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Themes in Ancient and Medieval Warfare
Ancient and Medieval Warfare Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes (depending on modules chosen).

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

Prospects

Our graduates typically find employment with organisations such as: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Element Productions, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government, national and international universities.

Read less
Discover the history, society and culture of the Greek and Roman world, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme. Read more
Discover the history, society and culture of the Greek and Roman world, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme.

Under the supervision of leading experts, you can pursue your own interests from Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity.

Distinctive features:

• Freedom to select optional modules tailored to your interests.

• Additional opportunity to specialise :

- Art and archaeology
- Warfare
- Late Antique and Byzantine worlds

Structure

You take a total of 180 credits of modules over one year (two semesters) for full-time study or over two years for part-time study. This includes 120 credits of taught modules.

Following successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation (60 credits).

For this element of the programme you research and write your 20,000 words on a subject of your choice, approved in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Themes and Approaches in Ancient History
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and language classes. As part of the programme, you will be supported to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

The taught element of the MA runs from October to May, and combines research training modules, study of an ancient language, and a choice of specialised options (listed below). It is also possible to take a residential course at the British School in Athens or the British School in Rome, subject to British School admission.

During the taught stage of the MA, you lay the foundations for the second part of the course, which is an individual research project, carried out between May and September, leading up to a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and written examinations (for ancient or modern languages).

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Read less
University of South Wales Cardiff campus
Distance from Cardiff: 0 miles
This course recognises the demand for innovative and truly creative individuals in the media industry. We produce highly regarded artists who will make a significant impact and contribution in today’s evolving marketplace. Read more
This course recognises the demand for innovative and truly creative individuals in the media industry. We produce highly regarded artists who will make a significant impact and contribution in today’s evolving marketplace.

Taught by our BAFTA award winning staff and visiting industry professionals, the course mission is to evolve highly respected individuals who will fill influential creative positions in the film, television, advertising, games, visual novels and mobile app fields. Students learn how to develop and explore intellectual property and realise its outcome, channelling animation into new forms of information delivery within the entertainment and communication industries. This will provide you with vital professional links after graduating and help to build your confidence and skill-base specific to your own career needs.

During the course you will explore animation production through a series of lectures, seminars and practical workshops. This will be supported by life drawing sessions, technical support and software demonstrations covering practical and technical skills at an advanced level. In addition to this, industry-related guest lecturers will be invited to provide vibrant masterclasses and workshops offering professional advice and guidance on your work.

You will also be encouraged to attend the many animation festivals celebrated in the UK and abroad whenever possible, including Annecy International Animation Film Festival and Bradford Animation Festival.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/138-ma-animation

Skillset accredited

Our MA Animation is part of the Skillset Media Academy Wales, a partnership of the leading film and media schools in Wales. Students on our postgraduate animation award benefit from close contact with the Academys Industry Panel and opportunities to access professional master classes, workshops, networking events, jobs and work placements. They also have the chance to promote their work through an exclusive online network.

What you will study

You will develop a critical understanding of intellectual property and the evolution of animation into new forms of information delivery in today’s entertainment and communication industries. The course is designed to develop and produce your ideas through the following five modules:
- Animation Pre-Production
- Animation Production
- Animation Post-Production
- Advanced Software Skills 1
- Advanced Software Skills 2

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries:
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms:
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

PLEASE NOTE: Modules are subject to change.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Animation is taught in a professional and friendly creative environment. All staff are industry trained and active in research and/or consultancy. Our well-equipped studios include state-of-the-art facilities with industry-standard software packages. You will have studio and workshop tutorials that are supported by lectures, seminars, integrated case study analysis, discussion groups and multimedia presentations. There is also a programme of industry-related guest lectures delivered by experienced visiting lecturers.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The MA Animation produces flexible, highly skilled animators who can make a significant contribution to the field. Our graduates have successfully gained work at multi award-winning and internationally recognised studios, including A Productions Ltd, Aardman Animations Ltd, ArthurCox, Bermuda Shorts, Beryl Productions International Ltd, Blitz Games, Disney Interactive, Double Negative, MTV, Nexus Productions, Rushes and Tinnopolis.

Assessment methods

Throughout the MA Animation you will be assessed on the outcome of your practical work supported by written reports.Assessment may also include individual or group presentations during seminar sessions, offering the opportunity to not only build your confidence in discussing your ideas to your peers, but also provide the opportunity to receive feedback on your progress and ways of developing your work.

Read less
Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching. Read more
Our Applied Linguistics programmes offer knowledge and expertise to take you into a role in any profession requiring specialised language awareness, including language teaching.

The programme incorporates three broad areas of study: research methodology; language description and comparison; and specialised topics in language and social life, foreign language teaching and multimodality.

Distinctive features:

Our Centre for Language and Communication Research has an international reputation as a field leader in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multimodal communication, systemic functional linguistics, forensic linguistics, and formulaic language.

Structure

Students can complete a Postgraduate Diploma or an MSc in Applied Linguistics. The course can be taken on a full-time basis or part-time basis. You will complete the programme in 1 year for full-time study and in 2 years for part-time study.

There are three compulsory modules in the Applied Linguistics programmes. You will also select three further modules from a pool of optional modules.

• PGDip core modules:

Language Description
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Phonology

• PGDip optional modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same as PGDip core modules with the addition of a dissertation.

• MSc optional modules:

Same as PGDip.

Teaching

The teaching for each module combines discussion of theoretical issues with training in analytical methods often based on texts of your own choosing.

Learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

You are expected to do the reading and other relevant preparation to enable them to take a full part in these activities and are encouraged to explore the resources of the library as appropriate.

Assessment

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will often be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest.

Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments. Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for disabled students, if any, are noted in the Module Descriptions.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study in the School is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much-enhanced career prospects while many UK students use the qualification to travel to new countries, often as teachers of English, or to begin academic careers of their own.

Outside education and academia, the principle avenues of employment for graduates are speech therapy, the creative and media sector, administration and publishing.

Read less
Enhance your understanding of Archaeology by region and period, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme. Read more
Enhance your understanding of Archaeology by region and period, through a combination of taught modules and individual research in this flexible programme.

Renowned for our particular expertise in the British Isles, Europe and the Mediterranean area, our experts teach from the Neolithic through to the Celtic, Roman and Viking periods.

You will be able to critically assess the work of others and of your own, to engage effectively in debate at an advanced level, to plan, design and carry out a coherent research strategy, and to produce detailed and coherent reports and presentations. The wide-range of transferable skills acquired are a particular strength for the pursuit of careers outside of archaeology and the heritage sector.

In addition to our general MA Archaeology programme we offer three pathways to shape your studies. You can choose the pathway that best suits you. The pathway you choose will determine the modules you go on to study.

The three pathways are:

• European Neolithic
• Prehistoric Britain
• Early Medieval Society and Culture

Structure

This course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in 3 years by part-time study.

Taught Stage:

You will take two core modules (40 credits) and four optional modules (80 credits). The options you take will depend on the pathway you choose.

Dissertation Stage:

On successful completion of the taught course element you will go on to complete your dissertation (60 credits). This takes the form of an individual research project, resulting in a dissertation of around 20,000 words.

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
MA Archaeology Dissertation

For a list of the optional modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/archaeology-ma

For a list of the optional modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/archaeology-ma-part-time

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures, tutorials and practicals in the archaeology laboratories.

As part of the programme, you will deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and coursework.

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

This self-regulated year of study is ideal preparation for progression to PhD.

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have embarked on careers in a range of professions from academia, the heritage sector, journalism and law to media research (media, commercial, academic), teaching and publishing. A significant number choose to continue studies at PhD level.

Recent destinations include: CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government and a range of universities in the UK and overseas.

Read less
Cardiff University Welsh School of Architecture
Distance from Cardiff: 0 miles
This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect. Read more
This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect.  It shares many of the design elements of our established MArch (Master of Architecture/ Part 2) programme, but provides greater flexibility in terms of study choices, allowing you to engage with the interests of our research staff. 

In the programme, we will focus on using design-led research to inform your learning and investigation. You will develop your existing design skills by focussing on how design thinking might address current global challenges. This approach offers an intense and lively forum for the exploration and discussion of design issues. This is why we place particular emphasis on using design as a means to conduct research. Researching through design is a creative activity that closely integrates the process of designing with the act of researching, so that they can mutually inform each other.  You will explore problems by making and testing design propositions, introducing and developing established knowledge as and when required.  Through project work, you will draw on knowledge from many disciplines.

You will work in small groups called ‘design units’ under the guidance of an experienced tutor and also work independently to develop a research-focussed approach to your studies. This will require you to question and evaluate evidence and think creatively and iteratively. Emphasis will be on individual discovery and personal reflection as a learning process.

Distinctive features

• Study in one of the top Schools of Architecture in the UK
• Supported by the School’s award-winning Design Research Unit Wales (DRUw) 
• Learn from notable design-led practitioners; currently more than 50% of our design programmes are delivered by practising architects
• Perfect for students who prefer a more practical/active approach to learning through our focus on investigation through design
• Choose from a range of optional modules to supplement your learning in areas of interest to you and develop important skills in design-based research

Structure

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis. You will be based in the Welsh School of Architecture for the duration of the programme. The taught element of this programme is structured around a 60 credit design module, where you will use techniques of research through design to explore an issue of interest related to one of the School’s design units.  This will normally run between October and April and will conclude with a final presentation in front of a panel of reviewers. Your work in the design studio is complimented by a 30 credit module analysing architectural precedent, and a choice of optional study modules.

You will usually start the dissertation element of the programme in May and complete this over the summer. The dissertation is the culmination of your design research throughout the programme.  The dissertation usually comprises of a documented design project, accompanied by a 5000 word critical commentary.  Support for developing the necessary skills of research through design will be provided during the taught elements of the programme.

During your year on the programme, you will focus on developing a design-research agenda, defining and establishing your own position in architectural design. The topics covered are usually structured around thematic studios, or ‘units’ led by design tutors who have expertise and interest in specific areas of research and/ or practice. The themes are often related to areas of research expertise within the School and may be run in conjunction with the units offered on the MArch programme.

You will undertake analysis of architectural precedent within the studio environment and choose 30 credits worth of optional modules, chosen from a list of subjects based on the research interests of the staff in the school. This list is reviewed on an annual basis. You can choose any combination of 10 and 20 credit modules for your option. 

For your dissertation you will work independently using the skills that have been developed during the taught programme to develop a critical research argument through design.  This will involve completing a design thesis project. You will be expected to supplement this with a 5000 word critical written commentary.

Core modules:

Architectural Design and Research
Analysis of Precedent
Design Thesis (Dissertation)

Optional modules:

Issues in Contemporary Architecture
Design Principles and Methods 3
Earth and Society
Low Carbon Footprint
Climate Comfort & Energy
Architectural Technology 3a

Assessment

Design projects and related exercises are assessed continuously, often through pin-up reviews and symposia where feedback is given. At the end of the year, a portfolio of all design-related work is presented for formal examination by panels of reviewers.

Optional modules are usually assessed through written examination and coursework submitted during the semester. Please read the module descriptions for your chosen optional modules to find out more about the ways they are assessed.

The criteria by which assessments are made are contained in the School’s Teaching Handbook, in project and coursework documentation, and explained at introduction to the various modules and design projects.

Career Prospects

Whilst many of our graduates will choose to undertake a career within architecture or other built environment professions, the programme provides a large number of transferable skills which will be of benefit across a wide range of professions.  The focus on independent, project based learning is welcomed by employers in that it provides graduates with skills in creative thinking, conceptual organisation, critical reflection and taking initiative.

Fieldwork

During the course we go on a range of study trips in the UK, Europe, or further afield. On these trips we will organise guided visits to buildings that demonstrate how principles taught in the programme are applied in revolutionary large-scale eco-buildings. You will also have the opportunity to meet architects and built environment professionals who collaborate with the School. In the past, students have travelled to Barcelona, Venice, Rome and the Ruhr Valley, amongst other places.

Read less
The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design. Read more

Course Overview

The Master of Art (Art and Design) programme will cater for students who wish to develop their academic and research knowledge from within the practical disciplines and wider academic fields of Fine Art and Design.

Typically this might include teachers, aspiring artists or designers, aspiring academics, or recent graduates in Fine Art or Design who wish to further their professional practice. It will also cater for those students with first degrees outside Art & Design who wish to convert their career path by following a more theoretical route in Art and Design.

The MA Art and Design is designed as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module [RS]) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design will align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design curriculum is designed so that students:
- Explore and develop concepts, skills or philosophies
- Develop creative skills
- Have a trajectory towards progression to MPhil/PhD

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/ma.aspx

Course Content

The suite of Master of Art (Art and Design) pathways currently offered is:
Art History through Practice
Art, Science & Technology
Design Futures
Ecologies
Fashion Design Futures
Philosophy

Learning & Teaching

The MA Art and Design is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP. Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment.

To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the fine-art/design expertise in a respective fine-art/design department. Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA Art and Design students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA Art and Design programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Art and Design Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE . The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online.

Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module, including the Research and Ideas Module.

Each 60 Credit module is typically delivered through:
- Seminars; workshops; lectures; personal and group tutorials, and supervised use of workshop equipment (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (75 hours).

- Directed study via virtual learning, e.g. Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment or student blogs or wikis (100 hours) except for ART7004 Output (125 hours).

- Self-directed study. (400 hours)

Employability & Careers

The MA Art and Design acts as a gateway to research or advanced experimental practice. It has an option for students to focus on research (by taking the initial formal PG Cert Research Skills module) or by taking an alternative creative practice route both leading towards potential future MPhil/PhD study. Students taking the MA Art and Design align with specific research and experimental practice pathways, led by academic staff with established practice careers and/or advanced scholarship and research.

The MA Art and Design programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, designers or researchers. The MA Art and Design programme aims to develop increasing creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists or designers.

All students’ are expected to complete a portable ‘record of achievement’ and use their PDP to support employability and life-long learning, normally in the form of a blog, that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Read more
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

One of two strands of enquiry in arts practice at masters level (the other beting Arts Practice, Fine Art) the MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course offers students the opportunity to explore their own art practice or to take an outward facing approach, in partnership with others. Students of the course develop the skills to evaluate, critique and implement methodologies, gaining the ability to articulate sound arguments relevant to their practice.

Graduates exploring the role of the Arts in realising health and wellbeing focus on the value of the arts in community engagement and also its impact on the environment. They make a significant contribution to the advancement of Arts in Health within Wales and further afield.

The broad and interdisciplinary nature ensures that our course reflects the diversity of activity and interest in this dynamic field.

The role of the arts in health and well-being is widely recognised and valued. The MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course will be of interest to artists, arts or health managers, community workers and teachers, plus those with an interest in the relationship between arts and health. It aims to support and develop innovative practice and research in this vibrant and expanding sector, so you will be encouraged to engage in creative dialogue,collaboration and interdisciplinary working

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/940-ma-arts-practice-art-health-and-wellbeing

What you will study

The MA Art Practice course runs over two calendar years if you choose part-time study, or one calendar year for full-time study:

Part One
- Critical Studies in the Arts (20 credits)
Learn about systems of enquiry, how to understand and engage with objects and issues that affect your particular domain

- Arts Practice 1 (40 credits)
Develop your skills in your chosen discipline, challenging genre and context to develop an original body of work in either a studio context or placement.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – June during your first year.

Part Two
- Arts Praxis (40 credits)
Refine and build upon your line of enquiry, develop new skills, producing a body of work within a studio context or placement which demonstrates complexity of understanding.

- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 credits)
Explore entrepreneurial, marketing and management aspects of contemporary practice within a framework of social, political, economic and cultural responsibility

- Major Arts Project (60 credits)
Complete a detailed project demonstrating praxis; an area of research and practice relevant to your concerns, utilising research methods appropriate for an arts scholar and an appropriate means of presentation.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – September during your second year.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Art Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The MA Art Practice course makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits (additional costs will apply for field trips and visits). Contact time will include weekly workshops or seminars, and regular group and individual tutorials. You will also be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practice and gain experience in the field through practical placements, mentoring and live projects matched to your needs whilst benefiting from specialist facilities and expertise to extend your skill sets.

Graduates can progress to careers in academia, arts administration, artists in residence, arts education, arts and disability, community arts, commissioned works, gallery administration and curatorship, health sector management, public art, studio practice, social services, and youth work.

Assessment methods

You will usually have to complete coursework as you progress, and normally sit exams at the end of each academic year.

Facilities

Practical facilities available to students include an MA base room, computer lab with software for digital imaging and film editing, printmaking studio, ceramics, casting, wood and metal workshops, photographic darkroom and studio.

Learning resources include the campus library, access to online journals and research.

Teaching

Our MA Art Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

Read less
In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. Read more
In a world dominated by visual imagery, artists need the appropriate skills, reflexive approaches and attitudes of critical enquiry to work as effective professionals within their field. In this personalised course of study you can either explore your own specialism of fine art practice, or develop your practice across a broader range of interdisciplinary activity. In a supportive and challenging environment, you will be encouraged to be independent and enterprising in the promotion of yourself and your art.

The course is available to study either full-time over 1 calendar year or part-time over 2 calendar years. As a part time student it is possible to undertake the course from a distance and alongside existing employment.

You will develop new ways of looking at your own practice. You will explore distinct areas of contemporary fine art while reviewing your own and fellow students’ work-in-progress. Through negotiation, you will develop a proposal for new work that will form the framework for further development.

The course is structured to enable you to fully realise your ambitions for your practice. A lecture programme and regular contact with teaching staff, along with seminars from prominent practitioners, will assist you towards the production of a significant body of new work along with a key research folio within which you reflectively evaluate your practice. Students have in the past exhibited their final work at public galleries such as Chapter Arts Centre, Elysium Gallery, West Wharf Gallery and Arcade Cardiff.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/934-ma-arts-practice-fine-art

What you will study

The MA Arts Practice runs over two calendar years part-time or one calendar year full time:

- Part One:
Artist Practitioner 1 Critique 40 credits

Choice of one, 20 credit module from the three MA common modules, which you will study alongside Postgraduate students from other courses across the Faculty of Creative Industries:
- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
- Research Paradigms

- MA Common Modules:
You will receive a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of the core MA Arts Practice course, but because everyone has different requirements of their postgraduate experience, you can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship:
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries:
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms:
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Part Two
- Artist Practitioner 2 Context (40 credits)
- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 Credits)
- Artist Practitioner 3 Major Project (60 Credits) or Research Project –Learning Through Employment (60 Credits)

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Arts Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The programme makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits. The contact time you receive will include weekly workshops or seminars and regular group and individual tutorials. In addition, you will be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Modules are taught via a combination of group seminars and lectures, with individual one-to-one tutorials taking place regularly to support your progress.

We encourage students to discuss and provide feedback on each other’s work, and to approach assignments in groups where appropriate to develop essential skills in teamwork and project management.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

- Work/study placements:
In addition to developing your personal area of art practice, you will benefit from the chance to gain practical exhibiting and curatorial experience and to explore other avenues of professional practice.

- Career options:
Graduates of MA Arts Practice (Fine Art), can progress to careers in academia, a Fine Artist, Teacher, Artist in residence, Public Artist, Community Artist, Ceramicist, Exhibitions Organiser, Socially Engaged Practitioner, Prop maker, Technician, Technical Demonstrator, Craft Designer, Gallery Owner, Art Dealer, Art Conservator, Curator, Art Gallery Technician, Art Transporter, Arts Journalist, Critical Commentator, Web Designer, Arts Administrator, Set Designer, Model Maker, Illustrator, Mural Designer, Creative Director, Art Director, Arts Business Manager or Arts Publicist.

Assessment methods

Modules are largely assessed via practical outcomes, project proposals and research folios. Some modules make use of presentations and discussion of working methods and final outcomes.

We will give you regular verbal feedback to help you develop your understanding during each module.

Facilities

Studying art at the University of South Wales means you can work in dedicated studio spaces and base rooms at our Treforest campus. Within your specialism, you will be able to accomplish a high standard of work in our extensive specialist facilities: 3D workshop, print room, and ceramic studios all equipped with traditional and state of the art facilities, including digital suites and a fully equipped lighting studio for photography. Opportunities are available to extend your technical skills through tailored undergraduate modules.

Facilities at our nearby Cardiff campus range from photographic darkrooms and professional-level printers, to video and audio production studios. While facilities are available in the first instance to students studying related courses, they are available more widely to students wishing to explore cross-disciplinary and multi-media techniques. You will be able to borrow a full range of equipment including cameras, microphones and lighting.

Our specialist library offers a comprehensive range of textbooks, research journals and other physical and online resources, as well as an interlibrary loan service.

Teaching

Our MA Arts Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

Read less
The MA Broadcast Journalism is aimed at people who have decided to pursue a career in radio or television news and current affairs. Read more
The MA Broadcast Journalism is aimed at people who have decided to pursue a career in radio or television news and current affairs. Our aim is to help you to get your first job in a highly competitive industry.

All journalists need to know how to find and research stories, how to interview people and how to write well. These days, that’s not enough. Modern broadcast newsrooms are digital and multi-media. Entry-level journalists are expected to be multi-skilled and familiar with the latest technology.

We use digital TV and radio studios to teach you how to gather and broadcast your content. We also organise a three-week industry placement for you to put into practice the skills we teach.

We will encourage you to originate and distribute your stories through the latest social channels. Are you comfortable using Twitter, Instagram, or Steller in a professional way? You will be by the time you leave us.

We are looking for people who can demonstrate a keen interest in news. We expect you to be engaged with what’s happening in the world. If you regularly watch and listen to TV and radio news programmes, that’s a good starting point.

We also look for people who already have some evidence of their commitment to a career in journalism. This could be acquired through student journalism or work placements in a newsroom. We don’t mind what subject you have studied at undergraduate level.

You will leave us with an MA that is widely recognised as being at the forefront of postgraduate training for a broadcasting career in digital multi-media newsrooms. Your time with us will be hard work, but hopefully it will be rewarding, and the beginning of an exciting career.

Distinctive features:

• MA Broadcast Journalism is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council
• Industry placements in the second semester
• An outstanding alumni network across the media

Structure

This is a year-long course.

Broadcast journalism skills are acquired through a series of lectures, demonstrations, practical exercises and feedback sessions of increasing complexity and realism - from 'paper exercises' in the early days to complex radio and television productions that report on real events in real time. These sessions are supplemented by seminars, playbacks, group discussions and industry guests.

Basic writing, reporting and technical skills are taught in the first semester against a background of group listening and viewing to good current professional practice.

The second semester adds editorial and production skills in both radio and television. We use the device of twice weekly ‘production days’ to integrate newsgathering and production skills with the team working and editorial/resource management skills needed to produce real-time broadcast outputs.

During the Easter break you will test your skills against the real world in a work placement (or placements) of a minimum three weeks duration in a radio or television newsroom of your choice.

Following the Easter recess you will have the opportunity to study from a wide and varied selection of elective modules which include sports, motoring, business and data journalism.

Finally individual writing, reporting and storytelling skills are tested in both media are tested in the final portfolio of work and the final practical examinations.

Your major project will be self-accessed and student-led. You will originate, research and produce a story that will be delivered for radio, television and online.

Core modules:

Public Administration
Reporters and the Reported
Digital Journalism
Broadcast Journalism
Broadcast News Production
Broadcast News Reporting & Production
Media Law and Ethics
Professional Development
Major Project

Optional modules:

Motoring Journalism
Business and Financial Journalism
Lifestyle & Consumer Journalism
Political Reporting
Sports Journalism
Data Journalism
Yr Agenda Cymreig

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of practical workshops, studio time and productions days which replicate an industry environment as well as lecture series to support the more academic elements of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical class room activities to academic essays and examinations.

Career prospects

This is a period of great change in all fields of journalism – including broadcast – but our employment record continues to be good.

Our graduates typically leave us to work as broadcast journalists in local radio or regional TV newsrooms. Recent graduates are now working for organisations like BBC and ITV News, SKY, CNN, Reuters, Bloomberg and Al Jazeera English. Over the years we have helped hundreds of people to start their careers in broadcast journalism. Many are now working at the top of the profession.

Placement

You will undertake a 15 day industry placement during the Easter break. Placements are co-ordinated by the course tutors and take into account your geographical preferences. Placements may be in radio or TV newsrooms, or both.

Read less
The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
University of South Wales City campus, Newport
Distance from Cardiff: 0 miles
MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health is for you if you’re working with, or intend to work with children or young people whose social and emotional development and functioning is affected adversely, or who risk being affected by mental health difficulties. Read more
MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health is for you if you’re working with, or intend to work with children or young people whose social and emotional development and functioning is affected adversely, or who risk being affected by mental health difficulties. Students who wish to study the Masters at the University may be a graduate and/or have significant relevant experience.

At the University of South Wales, you will broaden your understanding of the causation, presentation and implications of child and adolescent mental health difficulties, and social emotional and behavioural difficulties. You’ll develop the knowledge and skills to input where appropriate into interventions for individuals and groups with child and adolescent mental health difficulties and social emotional and behavioural difficulties (CAMHD/SEBD). Also to advise colleagues and parents on the formulation of appropriate strategies for working with children and young people with CAMHD/SEBD and to contribute to the development of appropriate policy and guidelines. You will explore the need for evidence based approaches and interventions which will promote children and young peoples’ mental health and social and emotional competencies.

The MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health encourages students to critically evaluate and reflect upon current theoretical perspectives in relation to child and adolescent mental health, and social emotional and behavioural difficulties (CAMHD/SEBD). The Masters also enables students to reflect on and contextualise current practice, and to make connections between theory and practice. In addition, the course encourages students to look critically at the research in relation to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Difficulties and Social Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1160-ma-child-and-adolescent-mental-health

What you study

You will take two compulsory modules:

- Child and Adolescent Mental Health - The module introduces students to definitions and concepts in the field of CAMH and the current structuring of CAMH Services in the United Kingdom. Sessions look in detail at particular Mental Health Difficulties, which include Attachment Difficulties, Emotional Difficulties, and Behavioural Difficulties. Particular study is made of gender and culture in relation to Mental Health Difficulties and these sessions include a focus on eating disorders, self-harm and trauma.

- Research Methodology - In common with all of the MA Education programmes, you must take the core module; Research Methodology.

Additional specialist modules can include:

- Managing and Supporting Children and Adolescents with SEN (CAMH/SEBD) - This module focuses on the theory that underpins practice in this area of work, and compliments the core module. The module looks at definitions and conceptual difficulties in relation to CAMH and SEBD, and then goes on to examine how theory impacts on interventions in different models (therapeutic, behaviourist and bio-psycho-social.

- Children’s Wellbeing - This module takes a broad view of Children’s wellbeing by exploring the concept of, and the challenges of, measuring wellbeing in addition to considering how wellbeing is addressed in Health, Education, Social Care, Youth Justice and by Non-Governmental Organisations. The module will also explore and evaluate a range of approaches to promoting Children’s wellbeing and an integral part of the lecture programme will be the use of Visiting Lecturers to illustrate examples of evidence-based practice.

- Working with Vulnerable Children - This module examines contemporary models of childhood and adolescence and introduces the concepts of vulnerability, risk and resilience. The module also considers the challenges of research and intervention with vulnerable groups.

Alternatively you can take one module from one of the other MA Education pathways. To complete the full MA you will present a 17,000 word research dissertation and a 3,000 word research dissemination plan.

Learning and teaching methods

Each module is assessed via a written assignment of 5,000 words, which usually takes the form of an essay. Each course member is supported by a tutor who provides individual tutorials and guidance during the assignment writing process.

Assessment methods

To complete the full MA you will present a 17,000 word research dissertation and a 3,000 word research dissemination plan. If you wish to exit earlier, the Postgraduate Diploma is awarded to students who complete four modules which form the taught element.

Employment Prospects

A Masters degree is required for professional advancement in numerous occupations, and is widely seen as evidence of a successful commitment to high level professional development. An MA award demonstrates that you have developed advanced level skills in analysis, evaluation and research.

If you are interested in the possibility of a higher degree by research, your tutors will be pleased to discuss the opportunities for doing so here at the University of South Wales.

Read less
​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. Read more

Course Overview

​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career, and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice and contemporary writing in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links. We have a focus on the contemporary that is underpinned with expertise in historical periods.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university's commitment to e-learning.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are co​re and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10 credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. In a 10 credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20 credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30 credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60 credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (New and Experimental Writing, Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example).

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of creative writing or who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing. Read more
Designed for experienced writers, this one-year full-time course will extend your knowledge and understanding of the practice of creative writing.

Developing your creative writing abilities and ideas beyond first degree, you will attend workshops, produce a portfolio of creative writing, attend classes in various topics in creative writing and gain experience in teaching creative writing.

A series of complementary courses stress an integrated experience of literary development and pedagogy of creative writing.

You will master the ability to independently produce literary works of refinement and skill, and to conduct writers’ workshops. You will also develop your knowledge and skills in the writing of one or more literary genre(s), the teaching of creative writing and the processes of editing and revision.

You will be assessed on two portfolios of creative writing and two essays or projects. There are no formal examinations.

Distinctive features:

• Dedicated teaching staff of professional writers;

• Opportunities for hands-on experience in teaching Creative Writing;

• Workshops and readings by eminent authors, along with Open Mic nights at a city centre venue, enabling you to share your writing with an audience to enhance your skills and confidence in public presentations;

• Small Group workshops;

• You will have the opportunity to attend a residential writing retreat at Gregynog Hall, a country mansion with a distinguished artistic heritage in mid-Wales.

Structure

The degree programme consists of four modules which are assessed at separate stages of the academic year. Overall, the degree is worth 180 credits. This is split by a portfolio of writing (60 credits), two essays (60 credits) and a second portfolio (60 credits).

From May to September, you will devote your time to completing your second portfolio of writing, produced exclusively during the course.

You must successfully complete the second portfolio to gain your Master’s degree.

Throughout both semesters you will attend a writer’s workshop, which leads to the first portfolio of written work (approximately 6,000 words, with a critical commentary of 1,000 words). One-to-one sessions with portfolio tutors also run in your second semester.

The Creative Process module gives you the chance to sit in on undergraduate classes and to teach a session and to visit local schools and colleges. Part one will be complete when you successfully pass an essay on teaching creative writing.

Core modules:

Creative Writing Portfolio I: The Writers' Workshop
The Creative Process
Teaching Creative Writing
Creative Writing Portfolio II

Teaching

Teaching is by a combination of small-group seminars, workshops, tutor led one-to-ones, placements in undergraduate classes and visits to outside schools and colleges anda three-day residential at Gregynog Hall.

You will be expected to read and analyse a range of critical and literary texts, read and assess peer work and develop self-reflective skills.

The learning activities will vary from module to module, but may include writing exercises, critical reading, analysis of craft, the presentation of critical and creative work to others, micro-teaching, etc. You are expected to give focused and constructive feedback in our supportive group workshops.

Assessment

You will be assessed through submission of two portfolios and two essays over the course of your degree.

The second portfolio, completed between May-September in your second semester, must be successfully completed and passed for you to gain your Master’s degree.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much enhanced career prospects. Example employers in the UK include Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Poetry Wales Magazine, Teach First, and the Welsh Government, with jobs that include Creative Writing Lecturer, Librarian, Poet, Recruitment Consultant, Teacher, and Writer.

Read less
The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Read more
The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Audiences are transforming into media producers; new business models are emerging; social media campaigns create new forms of politics; digital culture highlights practices of sharing and participation; and data collection and analytics affect an increasing part of our lives.

This offers new possibilities for digital citizens, but it also raises new questions regarding classic notions of privacy and freedom of expression, and it renders information and digital infrastructure a key resource.

The MA Digital Media and Society addresses current challenges of online communication and internet studies. It enables you to develop specialist knowledge in areas such as social media, big data, citizen journalism, digital culture, the creative industries, internet governance, and digital rights. It also provides a theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

This course provides you with a thorough understanding of the current transformations and with the analytical skills to investigate digital media in the context of social, political and economic change. We ask how online communication is shaped by users, states and businesses, and how our society is, in turn, affected by digital media.

This course draws on the strength and diversity of Cardiff University’s staff, giving you a unique opportunity to work with academics whose research explores issues such as citizen journalism, online activism, big data, internet surveillance, internet governance and digital rights.

You can get involved in our Research Group Digital Media and Society and thus become part of a dynamic research environment.

Please note this course focuses on academic research and does not provide extensive practical training.

Distinctive features

• Enables you to develop an in-depth understanding of digital media and their implications for the social, political, economic and cultural environment.

• Conveys specialist knowledge that addresses current areas of concern, such as social media use, big data, the sharing economy, privacy and surveillance, internet governance, digital rights, and citizen journalism.

• Empowers you to assess how technological change is linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, and historical developments, and how it affects democracy and social change.

• Equips you with a thorough theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

• Allows you to apply up-to-date research skills to carry out your own original research for the dissertation and beyond.

• Produces reflective and well-trained graduates who understand the multiplicity of social, cultural, political and technological complexities of digital media and who will be able to solve complex problems and make informed decisions in their future careers.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time course, combining core and optional modules. Over the course duration you will study modules totalling 180 credits.

Core modules:

Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Understanding Digital Media
Citizen Journalism and Digital Publics
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and seminars, which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career prospects

Graduates of MA Digital Media and Society are employed in a range of occupations, including the non-profit sector, digital business, online journalism, and regulatory institutions. They take on leading roles in social media campaigns, internet policy, human rights organisations, journalism, and creative industries.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares you for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X