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Bangor×
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Languages, Literature & Cu…×

Full Time MA Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture, Bangor, United Kingdom

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Bangor University School of Modern Languages
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course provides students with an extensive grounding in contemporary critical theory and the way it can be applied in a range of European cultural contexts. Read more
The course provides students with an extensive grounding in contemporary critical theory and the way it can be applied in a range of European cultural contexts. The course offers the opportunity to specialise in specific aspects of European culture that are close to areas of staff expertise, including history, film, literature and the visual arts. You will conduct an extensive research project of your choice under close guidance in a supportive and vibrant environment.

The course provides ideal preparation for doctoral research across the humanities and social sciences. It also prepares graduates for a wide range of careers in education, the arts, politics and public policy.

What will I study?
Students take four taught modules (three compulsory, one optional), and prepare a dissertation on a topic of their choice.

Course structure
Semester 1:

LXM4002 Research Methods (30 credits, compulsory): This includes skills in academic writing, presenting, and conducting bibliographic research in different language areas.

LXM4001 Modes of Critical Theory (30 credits, compulsory): This module takes a thematic approach to critical modes of analysis and critical theories. Up to six themes are to be studied in a given academic year, including (but not limited to):

Memory
Self / Other
Aesthetics
National Identity
Conflict
Performance
Space / City
National / Cultural Boundaries
Theories of Language
Semester 2:

LXM4031 Critical Theory in Practice (30 credits, compulsory): Building on Critical Analysis 1, this module incorporates student-led case studies based on themes studied in semester 1, and requires some target-language academic writing to complement the analysis conducted.

Target Language option module (30 credits, select one from the following options):

German

LXM4007 (Non)conformity in the GDR
LXM4026 Sites of Memory in Eastern Germany
LXM4008 Writing Austria
LXM4029 German Memory Pathologies
French

LXM4010 From Decadence to Dada
LXM4011 Visions of the City in French Cinema
From 2013/14 Noirs de France: Immigration, Integration and Identity
From 2013/14 From Surrealism to Street Art: Art, Politics and Everyday Life in France
Spanish

LXM4012 Translating Spain
LXM4013 Twentieth-Century Spanish Women’s Writing
LXM2020 Watching Spain: Visual Representations of the 20th Century
Italian

LXM4016 Italian Romanticism
LXM4017 Twentieth-Century Italian Short Fiction
Summer:

LXM4018 Dissertation (60 credits, compulsory): 20,000 words on topic relevant to chosen language specialism or comparative (to be approved in Semester 1).

Assessment
Coursework includes short exercises and critical essays on Research Methods and aspects of Critical Theory; 20,000-word dissertation.

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Bangor University School of English
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Read more
The course is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Research skills taught during the first semester will enable students to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and sources, ranging from theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of the Arthurian myth.

Background
Arthurian Literature is an established area of expertise in the School of English at Bangor University and has been taught here for over three decades. A long-standing record of teaching, research and publication attests to its vitality; the main specialists in the field are Dr Raluca Radulescu, whose work has focused on Malory, Arthurian romances and chronicles, especially through a cultural approach, and Professor PJC Field, currently President of the International Arthurian Society, and world-renowned for his work on the Arthurian legend through the centuries. However the course also draws upon the expertise available in other periods of literature within the School of English and other schools in the College of Arts and Humanities, ranging from post-medieval approaches in the School of English, or medieval Welsh, History and Archaeology, and Music. Staff in these areas contribute regularly to the teaching of Arthurian topics ranging from the medieval period to the present, including music and modern film adaptations.

Why Bangor for Arthurian Studies?
The attractiveness of the MA in Arthurian Literature at Bangor lies in its flexible, though comprehensive, approach to the study of this area. Students may choose to specialise in either the medieval or the post-medieval period but they will be required to take both modules with these titles in order to benefit from the wide coverage of the Arthurian legend they provide. At the same time they can enjoy all the benefits of one-to-one supervision in the Open Essay options, while also developing their research skills in the Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module (shared with the MA in English). Moreover, in-depth introductions to the study of medieval palaeography and codicology are available by collaboration with other relevant schools and disciplines, as a preparation to PhD level (see collaborative doctoral training scheme in palaeography and codicology organised by Dr Raluca Radulescu).

Students usually participate in the activities of the Centre for Medieval Studies, including the annual international postgraduate conference, ‘Medievalism Transformed’, the bi-weekly Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies seminar series (http://www.imems.ac.uk/) and the online postgraduate journal.

Structure
The MA in Arthurian Literature consists of two parts. Part One must be successfully completed before proceeding to the second part, the dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Compulsory Modules:

Part One

Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (30 credits), which develops knowledge of literary theory and research methods.
Medieval Arthur (30 credits), exploring the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to examining its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture.
Post-Medieval Arthur (30 credits), addressing the Arthurian myth and legends from the early modern period onwards, paying attention to the way the story was shaped in different centuries
Optional Modules:

Open Essay (30 credits): Supervised essays on topics of the student’s own choice.
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)
Manuscript and Printed Books (30 credits): An introduction to the study of medieval and early modern palaeography and codicology, in co-operation with the Bangor University Archives and Special Collections, which include the library of Bangor Cathedral
Subject to availability, students may choose relevant modules in medieval Welsh literature/Welsh Arthurian literature offered in the School of Welsh.
Part Two

Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece (20,000 words) of scholarly research, on a subject of your own choice and discussed in detail with a chosen supervisor. It will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.
Research Links with Industry
A collaboration with the tourist attraction ’King Arthur’s Labyrinth’ at Corris has led to fully funded Access to Masters MA places on this degree programme. The course also maintains links with people and organisations beyond Bangor: these might include guest speakers and visits to sites of literary interest.

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Mae'r cynllun MA a gynigiwn yn cael ei delwra i ddibenion a diddordebau'r myfyrwyr unigol ac yn cynnwys blwyddyn academaidd o astudio amser llawn. Read more
Mae'r cynllun MA a gynigiwn yn cael ei delwra i ddibenion a diddordebau'r myfyrwyr unigol ac yn cynnwys blwyddyn academaidd o astudio amser llawn. Yn ystod y flwyddyn honno, bydd y myfyriwr dan gyfarwyddyd gwahanol aelodau o blith staff yr Ysgol ac yn cyflwyno gwaith traethodol yn rheolaidd. Cyn diwedd y flwyddyn galendr, bydd gofyn i'r myfyriwr gyflwyno traethawd hir ac ynddo hyd at 20,000 o eiriau. Ymhlith y traethodau MA llwyddiannus a gyflwynwyd yn yr Ysgol yn ddiweddar mae rhai ar waith y llenorion Aled Islwyn, R. Gerallt Jones, Meic Povey, Bryan Martin Davies, Merched Kate Roberts, a golygiad o un o Anterliwtiau Twm o'r Nant.

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Bangor University School of Modern Languages
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Overview. This course offers an introduction to the academic discipline of Translation Studies, broadening the students’ understanding of diverse approaches to translation theory and practice. Read more
Overview
This course offers an introduction to the academic discipline of Translation Studies, broadening the students’ understanding of diverse approaches to translation theory and practice. The course also helps students acquire competence in translation practice, apply analytical thinking and come into contact with elements of the translation profession, such as terminology, CAT tools and working as a freelance translator.

What will I study?
Core modules in Semester 1 introduce the theoretical and methodological underpinnings for research in Translation Studies. Modules in Semester 2 provide students with an opportunity to investigate various aspects of the translation profession and work on an extensive practical translation portfolio on the languages of their expertise. The dissertation project consolidates students’ learning either through research or translation practice. The School of Modern Languages can offer supervision in a variety of areas and languages, including: Welsh, Spanish, Catalan, Chinese, English, French, Galician, German, Modern Greek and Italian.

Course structure
Semester 1:

Research Methods (30 credits)
Translation Studies: The Making of a Discipline (30 credits)
Semester 2:

Content modules (students choose ONE of the two modules)

Translation in Practice (30 credits)
Transcreative Writing (30 credits)
Practice Module

Working on a Translation Portfolio (30 credits) [languages covered: Welsh, English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Galician, Catalan, Modern Greek and Chinese] (30 credits)
Summer:

Dissertation (60 credits; topic relevant to chosen language specialism OR comparative). The dissertation may be a theoretical and research-based approach to any aspect of Translation Studies, or a proposed extended translation plus a critical commentary. The chosen text cannot have already exists in translation into the relevant language.

Assessment
Coursework includes short exercises on Research Methods, critical essays and reflective translation exercises. Your Research Project will be a 20,000-word dissertation, either on a critical aspect of Translation Studies or on a practice-led translation project accompanied by an analytical commentary.

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Bangor University School of Social Sciences
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
**This course is only available through the medium of Welsh**. Mae nifer y cymunedau a’r gweithleoedd dwyieithog ac amlieithog ar gynnydd, a chynllunio ieithyddol yn faes o bwysigrwydd cynyddol. Read more
**This course is only available through the medium of Welsh**

Mae nifer y cymunedau a’r gweithleoedd dwyieithog ac amlieithog ar gynnydd, a chynllunio ieithyddol yn faes o bwysigrwydd cynyddol. O’r herwydd, ceir mwyfwy o alw am unigolion sydd â’r wybodaeth a’r sgiliau angenrheidiol i lunio strategaethau a systemau effeithiol sy’n hyrwyddo cydraddoldeb ieithyddol. Wrth i ystyriaethau ieithyddol ddod yn flaenoriaeth ar gyfer llawer o feysydd - datblygu, cynllunio, addysg, iechyd, TG, marchnata - mae angen i staff mewn amrywiaeth eang o feysydd ddatblygu dealltwriaeth a sgiliau ym maes cynllunio ieithyddol. Ar ben hynny, mae cyhoeddi Mesur y Gymraeg (Cymru) (2011) wedi newid y fframwaith cyfreithiol ynghylch defnyddio'r Gymraeg ac felly’n golygu galw cynyddol fyth am weithlu dwyieithog, amryddawn.

Mae’r MA mewn Polisi a Chynllunio Iaith yn archwilio, mewn modd arloesol a chynhwysfawr, faes sy’n dod yn fwyfwy pwysig yng Nghymru a’r tu hwnt. Mae’r rhaglen yn elwa o arbenigedd amrywiol ysgolion Prifysgol Bangor ym meysydd Gwyddorau Cymdeithas, Ieithyddiaeth, Y Gyfraith, Busnes, Y Gymraeg, a Gwyddorau Iechyd a fydd yn rhoi i fyfyrwyr ddealltwriaeth o’r cwestiynau theoretig yng nghyswllt Cynllunio Iaith, yn ogystal â’r cwestiynau cymhwysol hollbwysig.

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Bangor University School of English
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Read more
Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Wales is the only one of the British Celtic nations to retain a widely-spoken, viable indigenous language and a vibrant contemporary literature. It is also the only British nation whose distinctive Anglophone literature remains marginalised within its own education system. At university level, the linguistic divide of the twentieth century encouraged the separate study of the two literatures, a schism which modern scholarship has only recently started to overcome. Bangor – a genuinely bilingual cultural centre – is an ideal place in which to study these two literary traditions from Wales, and to consider the question of what happens to English-language literature when it is not the principal tradition.

Part One:

The first part of the course comprises three modules which seek to provide students with an understanding of modern Welsh literary and cultural history, enable them to develop their understanding of key issues in modern Welsh literary scholarship and consider key issues across both literary traditions, from a cross-community perspective.

Introduction: ‘Who Speaks for Wales?’: In this introductory module, students will be asked to consider how issues of identity pertinent to Wales from 1840 to the present have been understood. Typically, students will study internal difference within Wales, Britishness, notions of Celtic identity, Wales as a postcolonial nation, parallels with other ‘dominated’ British nations, nationalist movements. Work by the following writers might be studied: Hywel Teifi Edwards, Saunders Lewis, Raymond Williams, Matthew Arnold, J.R. Jones, M. Wynn Thomas, Tony Conran, Dai Smith, Kirsti Bohata.
Welsh Modernity: Students will be asked to consider the ways in which literature across both linguistic traditions registers the arrival of modernity, and the changes subsequently wrought. Themes might include industry, class, urbanisation, capitalism, rural culture, religion, linguistic change and exile. Writers to be studied might include Caradoc Evans, Lynette Roberts, Caradog Pritchard, Dylan Thomas, Kate Roberts, R.S. Thomas, Arthur Machen, Emyr Humphreys, Idris Davies.
Gender and Wales: Students will study the relation between gender and the Welsh nation, and how gender roles have changed over the last century. Themes might include sexuality, masculinity and industry, gendered representations of the colonised space, the male body, women and representations of land. Writers to be studied might include: Elin ap Hywel, Jan Morris, John Sam Jones, Glyn Jones, Jane Aaron, Lewis Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhys Davies, Amy Dillwyn, Menna Gallie.
Part Two:

Preparation of a 20,000-word Dissertation, written in English or Welsh, on any aspect of the literatures in which the student is interested a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist.

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Bangor University School of English
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. Read more
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. It offers one-to-one supervision from experts in the field. You are also encouraged to participate in the lively research environment of the School and College, which includes the English Literature research seminar series, scholarly reading groups, workshops and conferences.

The course consists of taught modules (Part One) mainly assessed by essays, followed by a dissertation (Part Two). The modules within the English Literature programme are grouped into four ‘pathways’ . Each of these represents a particular area of research strength at Bangor and offers an aspect of literary study in which MA students may choose to specialise.

The four pathways:

1. Medieval and Early Modern Literature

2. Material Texts

3. Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present

4. Four Nations Literature

Students who prefer not to specialise by following one of the pathways may alternatively pursue a broader portfolio of advanced literary studies in English by completing the compulsory module (see below) and a free choice of three other modules.

Course Structure
Part One:

In the first part of the MA programme, all students are required to study FOUR modules of 30 credits each; for full-time students, this means two modules per semester. Of these four modules, one is compulsory: Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (in semester 1). This module lays the foundation for the MA by introducing you to key ideas in literary theory, the analysis of texts and the techniques of advanced scholarly writing.

In addition, students are required to choose three further modules from those listed below. You may make an open selection of modules OR follow one of the four pathways described above. In order to complete a pathway, you must choose at least TWO of your three optional modules from that pathway, with the final module being a free choice (from the pathway, from elsewhere in the English Literature MA programme, or from other relevant postgraduate programmes in the School or College).

1. Modules on Medieval and Early Modern Literature:

Pre-Modern Travel
Manuscripts and Printed Books
The European Renaissance
Myth and the Early Modern Author
Women’s Devotional Writing
Medieval Arthur
Post-Medieval Arthur
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
Editing Texts
2. Modules on Material Texts:

Manuscripts and Printed Books
Material Texts and Contexts
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Editing Texts
3. Modules on Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Material Texts and Contexts
Modernisms
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
4. Modules on Four-Nations Literature:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Modernisms
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
In addition to the above pathway-related modules, the following modules are offered:

Open Essay
The Postgraduate Conference
It is possible to take one optional module from the MA in Creative Writing (if the prerequisites of creative writing experience are met). If you should so wish, and in consultation with the Director of the MA in English Literature, there is also the option of taking one MA module from another School in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Part Two:

After the completion of the four modules which make up Part One of the programme, Part Two consists of a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist. If you are following one of the four pathways, you are expected to write your dissertation in a research area relevant to that particular pathway.

Students who have completed Part One of the MA programme but elect not to write a dissertation are awarded the postgraduate diploma.

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Wedi’i ddysgu ar y cyd gan Ysgol y Gymraeg ac Ysgol y Saesneg, y cwrs MA Llenyddiaethau Cymru yw’r cwrs cyntaf yn unlle yn y byd sy’n canolbwyntio ar astudio a chymharu testunau o’r ddau brif draddodiad yng Nghymru (lle bo angen, mewn cyfieithiad i’r Saesneg). Read more
Wedi’i ddysgu ar y cyd gan Ysgol y Gymraeg ac Ysgol y Saesneg, y cwrs MA Llenyddiaethau Cymru yw’r cwrs cyntaf yn unlle yn y byd sy’n canolbwyntio ar astudio a chymharu testunau o’r ddau brif draddodiad yng Nghymru (lle bo angen, mewn cyfieithiad i’r Saesneg). Cymru yw’r unig un o genhedloedd Celtaidd gwledydd Prydain i fod ag iaith frodorol hyfyw a siaredir ar raddfa eang a llenyddiaeth gyfoes gyffrous. Ar ben hynny, hi yw’r unig genedl yng ngwledydd Prydain y mae ei llenyddiaeth Saesneg unigryw yn parhau ar yr ymylon o fewn ei chyfundrefn addysg ei hun. Ar lefel brifysgol, oherwydd rhaniad ieithyddol a fodolai yn yr 20fed ganrif, anogwyd astudiaeth ar y ddwy lenyddiaeth ar wahân – agendor nad yw ysgolheigion cyfoes ond megis dechrau ei phontio. Oherwydd ei chanolfan ddiwylliannol wirioneddol ddwyieithog, mae Bangor yn lle delfrydol i astudio’r ddau draddodiad llenyddol hyn, ac i ystyried y cwestiwn ynglÅ·n â beth sy’n digwydd i lenyddiaeth yn y Saesneg os nad hwn yw’r prif draddodiad.

Rhan Un:

Mae rhan gyntaf y cwrs yn cynnwys tri modiwl sy’n ceisio rhoi dealltwriaeth i fyfyrwyr o hanes llenyddol a diwylliannol modern Cymru, eu galluogi i ddatblygu eu dealltwriaeth o faterion allweddol ym maes ysgolheictod llenyddol modern Cymru ac ystyried themâu allweddol ar draws y ddau draddodiad llenyddol, o safbwynt traws-gymunedol.

Rhagarweiniad: "Pwy Sy’n Siarad dros Gymru?": Yn y modiwl rhagarweiniol hwn, gofynnir i fyfyrwyr ystyried sut y deallwyd ac y deellir materion yn ymwneud â hunaniaeth Gymreig o 1840 tan y presennol. Bydd myfyrwyr yn nodweddiadol yn astudio gwahaniaethau mewnol yng Nghymru, Prydeindod, cysyniadau o hunaniaeth Geltaidd, Cymru fel cenedl ôl-drefedigaethol, profiadau cyfochrog â chenhedloedd eraill Prydeinig sydd wedi’u "dominyddu", mudiadau cenedlaethol. Mae’n bosib yr astudir gweithiau gan yr awduron canlynol: Hywel Teifi Edwards, Saunders Lewis, Raymond Williams, Matthew Arnold, J.R. Jones, M. Wynn Thomas, Tony Conran, Dai Smith, Kirsti Bohata.
Moderniaeth Gymreig: Gofynnir i fyfyrwyr ystyried sut y bu i lenyddiaeth ar draws y ddau draddodiad ieithyddol gofnodi dyfodiad moderniaeth, a’r newidiadau a ddilynodd yn ei sgil. Gall themâu gynnwys diwydiant, dosbarth, trefoli, cyfalafiaeth, diwylliant gwledig, crefydd, newid ieithyddol ac alltudiaeth. Gall llenorion i’w hastudio gynnwys Caradoc Evans, Lynette Roberts, Caradog Pritchard, Dylan Thomas, Kate Roberts, R.S. Thomas, Arthur Machen, Emyr Humphreys, Idris Davies.
Rhywedd a Chymru: Bydd y myfyrwyr yn astudio’r berthynas rhwng rhywedd a’r genedl Gymreig, a sut mae rolau rhywedd wedi newid dros y ganrif ddiwethaf. Gall themâu gynnwys rhywioldeb, gwrywdod a diwydiant, cynrychiolaethau ar sail rhywedd o’r gofod a wladychwyd, y corff gwrywaidd, merched a chynrychiolaethau o dir. Gall llenorion i’w hastudio gynnwys: Elin ap Hywel, Jan Morris, John Sam Jones, Glyn Jones, Jane Aaron, Lewis Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhys Davies, Amy Dillwyn, Menna Gallie.
Rhan Dau:

Paratoi traethawd hir 20,000 o eiriau, wedi’i ysgrifennu naill ai yn Saesneg neu yn Gymraeg, ar bwnc o’ch dewis chi yn ymwneud ag unrhyw agwedd ar y llenyddiaethau sydd o ddiddordeb i’r myfyriwr, wedi’i ymchwilio a’i ysgrifennu dan oruchwyliaeth unigol arbenigwr yn y maes.

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It is entirely possible to study with us through the medium of English or Welsh. This course is tailor made to suit the individual’s needs and interests and include a full academic year of full-time study. Read more
It is entirely possible to study with us through the medium of English or Welsh.

This course is tailor made to suit the individual’s needs and interests and include a full academic year of full-time study. During that academic year the student, under the School’s supervision, will produce essay work on a regular basis. Before the end of the calendar year, the student is asked to produce a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Recent successful MA dissertations have included work on writers such as Aled Islwyn, R. Gerallt Jones, Meic Povey and Martin Davies; others have been thematic studies, e.g. women in the works of Kate Roberts; still others have been more strictly philological, such as a recent edition of an Interlude by Twm o’r Nant.

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