• University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
ETH Zürich Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
London×
0 miles
Sociology×

Masters Degrees in Sociology, London, United Kingdom

We have 123 Masters Degrees in Sociology, London, United Kingdom

  • Sociology×
  • United Kingdom
  • London×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 123
Order by 
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. Read more
The Sociology of Education MA will guide students through the latest theories, concepts and research in the sociology of education, exploring the wider political, social and cultural contexts of policy and practice in education. It will encourage them to use sociological research to reflect on their current and future roles in education and provide them with a grounding for evaluating education practice.

Degree information

Students will develop critical theoretical, methodological and analytical skills in educational research in the sociology of education field and learn to apply them in their own professional context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits) or report (30 credits) plus one further optional module (30 credits).

Core modules
-Sociology of Education
-Understanding Education Research

Optional modules
-Gender, Education and Development
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Rights and Education
-Sociology of 'Race' and Education
-Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas
-Understanding Education Policy
-Values, Aims and Society

Students can also choose from a wide range of Master's-level optional modules across the UCL Institute of Education offering.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through mixed mode, including face-to-face Saturday and evening sessions and interactive online learning. Sometimes a conventional lecture-based approach is taken, with the aim of providing an overview of the field. Lectures are usually followed by open discussion or group work. At other times a seminar format is adopted involving, for example, group discussion of set reading, a video or an introductory presentation.

Assessment is through coursework essay assignments, plus submission or a report or dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as lecturers and teachers, local authority officers, government department officers, members of education think tanks, or as research students (MPhil/PhD, EdD).

Employability
Students develop a capacity to critically engage with an conduct educational research on issues relating to sociology and education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Education, Practice and Society at UCL Institute of Education is home to an interdisciplinary grouping bringing together high-quality teaching and research in the history, sociology and philosophy of education, international development, post-compulsory and vocational education and higher education.

The Sociology of Education MA is a cutting-edge programme taught by world-leading sociologists within the department who have expertise in research methods, policy analysis, equality and human rights: issues of gender, 'race', sexuality, youth, disability and social class.

Students gain invaluable networking opportunities with leading scholars and a cohort of internationally diverse students across the IOE's MA cluster in sociology, social justice and policy studies in education.

Read less
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-sociology/

Goldsmiths’ research in sociology covers a range of areas, including:

art and literature
deviance
education
the sociology of governance and regulation
theories of industrial society
health, illness and psychiatry
interpersonal relations
knowledge
politics
‘race’ and ethnicity
class
religion
values in society
childhood and youth culture
the body and society
social aspects of the life sciences and bio-medicine, science and technology
the expansion of capitalism on a world scale
urban studies
gender and the sexual division of labour
culture and communications

We emphasise the importance of the relationship between you and your supervisor: we ‘match’ you with a supervisor whose current active research interests and expertise are compatible with your chosen topic of research.

You will be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

The Sociology MPhil programme is recognised by the ESRC for excellence in research training.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer, Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

Skills

You'll develop advanced research training covering a wide range of qualitative and quantitative sociological methods, and an ability to develop advanced and extended forms of written argument and scholarly practice.

Careers

Possible careers cover:

Academia
Social research in applied areas like health or urban regeneration
Research consultancy
Practice-orientated work
Work in the arts and cultural industries
Publishing

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at the staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market. Read more
Our social world is changing all the time and there is a growing demand by employers for expert social researchers. This course is designed to give you the extra edge needed in a competitive job market.

UEL offers you a unique chance to study sociology at a university based at the heart of an area experiencing the quickest rate of social change in Europe. You will benefit from being taught by academic staff at the cutting edge of research who have excellent links to the communities developing around the campus.

We will introduce you to a variety of research methods and topics of study and give you advanced training in key sociological theories to enhance your understanding of the changes and crises associated with the modern era.

The course uniquely encourages students to consider contemporary debates through an attention to the local area and includes opportunities to carry out research in collaboration with organisations and research partners.

WHAT YOU WILL STUDY

During this one-year course (or two years part-time) you will receive advanced training in social research and sociological theory as well as furthering your understanding of key substantive areas of research such as urban change, class, gender, race, terrorism, nationalism and social policy.

You will also have the opportunity to carry out an original piece of research under the close supervision of one of our faculty members.

The course is designed to give you the opportunity to:
• Acquire postgraduate training in sociology and allied social sciences, particularly in relation to social research methods and theory development;
• Gain an understanding of how debates in sociology relate to local and global social contexts, as well as historical and contemporary events;
• Acquire the skills and training necessary for a wide range of employment opportunities in social research and analysis;
• Gain the knowledge and credentials necessary to conduct doctoral study in sociology and other social science disciplines.
You will complete one optional module and core modules on Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises, Framing Questions, Locating Research and Themes and Issues in Sociology as well as writing a master’s dissertation.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Graduates with social science master’s degrees are in high demand. According to recent data, social science graduates are more likely to be in paid employment than arts or science graduates, and more likely to be in managerial roles.

This new course provides graduates with the research skills and expertise needed to respond to a wide range of employment opportunities in diverse sectors.

This includes helping local and national governments seeking to understand the impact of policy decisions, working with NGOs who are looking to inform the public about neglected aspects of society or advising corporations on how to market their products effectively.

Our academic team are involved in groundbreaking research in key areas of sociology, including culture, nationalism, race, ethnicity, gender, class and social change.

They have excellent contacts, too, which will enable you to learn practical skills in the heart of east London. We have embedded our learning and research practice in the rapid changes and complex relations of this urban laboratory.

This is a unique opportunity to develop and refine your skills of research, analysis and collaboration in an environment that reflects some of the most pressing social questions of our time. You will be well prepared for your new role and future career.

MODULES

Theorising Modernity, Understanding Crises (core)
Framing Questions, Locating Research (core)
Themes and Issues in Sociology (core)
Critical Theories of International Relations (optional)
Global Environmental Politics (optional)
Introduction to Forced Migration (optional)
Current Issues in Forced Migration (optional)
Landscapes of power and rights (optional)
Masters Dissertation (core)

Read less
This MA provides students with the opportunity to study key concepts and approaches in political sociology and theoretical debates about the relationship between state and society, and identity and power. Read more

This MA provides students with the opportunity to study key concepts and approaches in political sociology and theoretical debates about the relationship between state and society, and identity and power. Graduates acquire a mix of in-depth area knowledge of Russia and Eastern Europe, research skills and theoretical understanding.

Degree information

The programme centres on sociology but is interdisciplinary in nature, combining topics and methods from political science, anthropology, history, cultural studies and economics to analyse the relationships among individuals, groups, institutions, governments and their environments. Students choose two core modules in political sociology and social science methods and can then select thematic or area-based options as well as the options to study Russian or another East European language.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), one of a choice of four modules in social science methodology (15 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - students take a 15 credits core module in Political Sociology and a 15 credit course from a list of options in social science methodology.

-Political Sociology

-Methodology

-Qualitative Methods

-Understanding and Analysing Data

-Comparative Analysis in Social and Political Research

-Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Optional modules

-Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance

-Cities in Eastern Europe

-Ethno-Political Conflict in Central and Eastern Europe

-Gender and Sexuality in Modern Russian Culture

-Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies

-Migration in the EU

-Nations, Identity and Power

-Politics of Southeast Europe

-Sexuality and Society in Russia and Eastern Europe

-Sociology of Religion

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, laboratory sessions, workshops, presentations, self-study and specialist language classes. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and a dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:

-Researcher, Saxton Bampfyble Hever Plc

-Global Education Officer, Childreach International

-Marketing Analyst, Business Services International

-Programme Co-Ordinator, Open Society Foundation

-Television News Reporter, ETV (Eesti Televisioon) (Estonian Television)

Employability

The MA opens up a range of opportunities and previous graduates from this programme have gone on to work in think tanks, political parties; national, European and international private and public sector organisations; and in the media and NGOs as political analysts. Other graduates have progressed to further academic study. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world- leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and South-east Europe and Russia.

This MA allows you to study the social and cultural issues in the region in unparalleled breadth and depth and to develop analytical and research capacities, language skills and practical insights.

Our nationally unequalled specialist library and central London location provide an ideal environment for research, while our close contacts with employers, policy-makers and alumni afford excellent opportunities for networking and career development.

Visit Us

The SSEES Postgraduate Open Evening will be taking place on 6th December from 5.30pm. It is an informal networking event for prospective MA and Research applicants to meet SSEES staff and students over refreshments. For more information and to register, please visit the following link: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/open-days



Read less
The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/. Read more
The MPhil in Visual Sociology offers you the opportunity to combine written sociological argument with film, sound, or photographic representation- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-sociology/

It will allow new researchers to re-think both the conduct of social research and the forms that social research writing takes in the 21st century.

Students registered on this degree will complete all of the research training modules outlined for the MPhil programme. The MPhil will allow you to re-think the gathering, analysis and presentation of research data and consider the future of sociological representation.

Assessment will be via a thesis, visual/aural component (a video or sound feature, or a photographic project), and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Research Officer of Sociology.

Department

Sociology at Goldsmiths is ranked:
9th in the UK and 45th in the world for this subject area**
9th in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

The Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths is active, contemporary and inventive. We are interested in everything from the ‘global’ issues of poverty and injustice to the ‘micro’ issues of cultural identity and the presentation of self in a digital world.

Our staff are some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – they’re the pioneers who are pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. They’ve played a key role in developing social research methods, setting agendas in social and cultural policy, and linking theory to practice.

Through their world-leading research you’ll be at the forefront of current debates and will be encouraged to see the world differently.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. You should look at our staff research interests to see if we are the right department for you and whether there is a member if staff who may match your research interests.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 1,500-3,000-word statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources
the name of a staff member who you believe would be interested in acting as your supervisor

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
Cultural processes are creative and dynamic, meaning that our analysis of them must be too. This programme emphasises the critical analysis of cultural processes from an advanced theoretical perspective and with an interdisciplinary outlook. Read more

Cultural processes are creative and dynamic, meaning that our analysis of them must be too. This programme emphasises the critical analysis of cultural processes from an advanced theoretical perspective and with an interdisciplinary outlook.

How can cultural analysis engage with the most significant challenges of the contemporary globalised world, with all its inequities and all its possibilities? Can the critical traditions of sociological thought provide adequate responses to today’s world?

The principal disciplinary resources the programme draws on are those of sociology of culture, cultural studies, post-structuralist philosophy, critical literary aesthetics and textual analysis. Together they provide students with a critical grasp on contemporary cultural processes and central issues in the theory and analysis of contemporary culture.

Our most flexible MA, the programme benefits from an expanded choice of option modules.

In addition to the core module and one chosen from within a wide range of Sociology options, you are able to choose two further modules from across a range of participating departments, allowing you to tailor the degree to your individual interests. 

The MA attracts students with backgrounds in social science, humanities and philosophy as well as more creative pursuits, and from across the world.

This course covers the following disciplines: 

  • sociology and social sciences
  • anthropology
  • art
  • philosophy
  • other humanities

Modules & structure

Overview

The MA enables you to develop critical and analytical interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary socio-cultural processes. It offers a sense of the breadth of possible approaches, while developing the skills necessary to produce original analyses in a scholarly and inventive manner. You take:

  • A core module (30 credits)
  • Three option modules (or equivalent; 90 credits in total)
  • A dissertation (60 credits)

The core module is taught within the Department of Sociology, and provides an introduction to critical contemporary sociological conceptualisations of culture, presenting opportunities for the development and exploration of interdisciplinary perspectives on the analysis of contemporary cultural processes. 

In addition to the core module, you also study three option modules (or equivalent). One of these must be chosen from Sociology; the others may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of AnthropologyEnglish and Comparative LiteraturePolitics and Media and CommunicationsMusicEducational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

You also write a Dissertation for which you meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staffand participate in Dissertation workshops.

As a full-time student, you would normally complete the core module and one option in the Autumn term, and two further options in the Spring term. As a part-time student you will spread these over two years. Core and option modules are normally taught by one hour lectures, followed by one hour seminars.

Core module

Option modules

You have 90 credits at your disposal; of these, 30 credits must be taken from within the Department of Sociology. You can choose either one regular option (30 credits) or two 'mini options' (2 x 15 credits) from the department's extensive list

For your other options, you can choose modules from the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Dissertation

For your Dissertation you'll meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff and participate in Dissertation workshops led both by staff and students (based on presentation and discussion of your work in progress). The dissertation is a substantive piece of research, empirical or theoretical, on a topic of your choice.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) awards are also available in this programme. For the award of Postgraduate Diploma, you would need to successfully complete the core module and option modules to the value of 120 CATS; for the Postgraduate Certificate you would need to successfully complete the core module and option modules to the value of 60 CATS. Please note that these are exit awards; if you successfully complete the whole programme you'll be awarded an MA.

Skills & careers

You'll develop the following skills during the programme:

  • advanced analytical skills
  • the ability to evaluate complex theoretical positions and to deploy those within appropriate formats and frameworks

Recent graduate have embarked on professional careers in social research, thinks tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media an dcommunications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

 Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
About the MSc programmes. The MSc Sociology provides rigorous and in-depth training in sociological theory, methodology, and key areas of sociological research. Read more

About the MSc programmes

The MSc Sociology provides rigorous and in-depth training in sociological theory, methodology, and key areas of sociological research.

These areas reflect the Department’s commitment to understanding and analysing global challenges. For instance, we make important contributions to the analysis of escalating inequalities and injustices across the globe, and we draw on this research in our graduate teaching. We also have strong research clusters in political sociology, the sociology of economic life, and urban sociology – in all these areas, several optional courses will be available for you to take. Additionally, we offer options on culture and society; families in contemporary societies; gender and society; and science and technology studies. 

As a student on this programme, you will be part of a vibrant, international academic community. You will benefit from the Department’s collaboration with different LSE Centres (such as the International Inequalities Institute, Cities, Human Rights and the Gender Institute) and a vibrant public events programme led by LSE academics and leading external sociologists..

Graduate destinations

Students go into a wide variety of professions, such as teaching, research, politics, public administration, the social and health services, advertising, journalism, other areas of the media, law, publishing, industry, accounting, marketing, personnel and management.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme 



Read less
University of Roehampton Department of Dance
Distance from London: 0 miles
Why study at Roehampton. An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world.
  • Reflect upon your experience, develop creative ideas and aid critical perspective in practice and theory.
  • Examine dance and dancers through sociological themes, such as social structures, power, relationships, cultural behaviour, and action.
  • Challenge you thinking about dance within conceptual, political, and social frameworks.
  • Roehampton is rated No. 1 for dance research in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

In this new programme, you will explore the relationships between dance and society.

You will be encouraged to challenge your thinking about dance within a framework of conceptual, political and social ideas throughout dance history. Engaging in rich discussions with an international dance community, you will examine dance, dancers and dancing through sociological and political lenses. You will be introduced to a range of concerns about dance, dancing and performance: from the body in society, to issues of representation, and relations of power.

You will have the opportunity to collaborate with experts in the field of dance in our supportive teaching community and with students from all over the world. Our holistic teaching approach will help you gain a strong foundation in understanding of the political and sociological implications for how dance functions in society. You will also gain in-depth knowledge of dance and the dancer as a social and political construct. This programme also provides you with an opportunity to reflect upon your experiences and develop creative ideas to gain a critical perspective in practice and theory.

The Department is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Dance Research, which foregrounds the research of dance as cultural and artistic expression beyond, and including, theatre performance. Through seminars, forums and conferences involving staff and international invited guests, the centre supports a compelling research culture.

We also have excellent links with dance companies and creative organisations. In easy reach of London’s vibrant dance scene, the campus has superb studios and a state-of-the-art theatre for dance students.

Content

In this programme, you will take a compulsory research methods module, the programme core module of Politics Sociology and Dance and your Dissertation module. Flexibility is built into the programme, so you can also choose some of your modules to suit your interests and needs.

In the module Ways of Knowing, which is shared by all dance postgraduate taught programmes, you will be introduced to research methods including ethnography, analysis, and practice-as-research. 

The module Politics and Sociology and Dance encompasses theoretical perspectives that engage with hegemonic and resistive issues relating to dance as a social and economic practice.

The module Dissertation is an individually tutored module that allows you to delve deeply into a research project that reflects your interests and experience in dance.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Ways of Knowing
  • Politics and Sociology and Dance
  • Dissertation
  • Classicism and Power
  • People Moving, People Dancing
  • Performance of Heritage

Career options

After this course, graduates may become a community dance practitioner, produce and curate arts projects and events, lead in education and outreach programs for dance, teacher or continue studying within an MPhil or PhD level.

Email Now



Read less
About the MSc programme. Political sociology is a subject with a long and distinguished history and a thriving contemporary debate. Read more

About the MSc programme

Political sociology is a subject with a long and distinguished history and a thriving contemporary debate. The MSc Political Sociology is designed to look beneath the day-to-day controversies of politics in order to explore the underlying forces that either promote or retard political and social change.

The programme will provide you with the analytical tools and the empirical knowledge to understand some of the fundamental forces that have shaped, and are shaping, the world in which we live. It combines a strong core course that explores classic empirical and historical puzzles about the relationship between politics and society, with the flexibility to develop individual interests in a wide range of different areas. It will give you the opportunity to expand your knowledge of politics and society, and to build up special expertise in particular areas.

It will also give you the opportunity to develop your capacity for rigorous oral and written argument. Seminar discussion and essay writing will foster a critical approach that will encourage you to re-evaluate commonly accepted ideas, to consider alternative explanations for important social and political developments, and to support your own conclusions with carefully deployed evidence.

Graduate destinations

Students go into a wide range of professions including academic research, teaching, politics, diplomacy, government policy-making, public administration, journalism, the media, law, publishing, industry, and management, as well as working for think tanks, activist groups, international bodies, and non-governmental organisations.

 Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
The School of Social Science, History and Philosophy supports research projects in sociology. Sociologically oriented research takes place within and across a number of the School’s 6 departments, particularly, but not exclusively, Psychosocial Studies and Geography, Environment and Development Studies (GEDS). Read more
The School of Social Science, History and Philosophy supports research projects in sociology. Sociologically oriented research takes place within and across a number of the School’s 6 departments, particularly, but not exclusively, Psychosocial Studies and Geography, Environment and Development Studies (GEDS). Sociological research takes a wide variety of forms depending on topic, and is frequently interdisciplinary in focus, but the common thread is a distinctively sociological perspective. Research students benefit not only from the advisory insight of leading academics, but also from a wider culture of support and advice from staff and other students undertaking social research.

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research is a considerable resource, and provides a focus for social research not only within the School, but across Birkbeck as a whole. It is a hub for the dissemination and discussion of critical and socially engaged social science in London and beyond. The Birkbeck Graduate Seminar, run by BISR, brings together PhD students working on empirical social research theses and aims to support and enhance the supervision students receive.

We seek to teach and research issues of fundamental importance to humanity. The School offers an invigorating educational experience, built upon our international reputation for research excellence. Our research spans a number of fields, spanning arts and humanities, social sciences and sciences, and is notable for its collaborative, interdisciplinary and innovative nature. In all our departments there is a particular focus on issues of social justice, on pressing questions of ethics and politics, and on making academic research important to the wider community.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

Read less
The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people. Read more
The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of sociological theories and concepts of childhood and children’s rights, including a recognition of the varied childhoods experienced by children in richer and poorer contexts and how these are shifting in a globalising world. It also helps students develop their critical analytical skills and improve their theoretical understanding and professional practice when working with, and for, children.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Children's Rights in Practice
-Social Theory
-Theories of Childhood and Society

Optional modules
-Researching Childhood*
-Understanding Research

*recommended

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Taught modules run in the evenings and/or over a one-week intensive block. Teaching is delivered face-to-face and through lectures, discussions and debates, and analysis of readings, images, and films. In addition there are tutorials for essays and dissertation preparation. Participants are encouraged to reflect upon their own experiences and backgrounds in teaching sessions. Each core module is assessed by 5,000-word written assignments.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as international NGO staff, children's charity workers, child advocacy workers and policy advisors. Graduates are also working as teachers and early years practitioners, while others have jobs as university and college lecturers and researchers.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Project Worker, Barnado's
-Research Advocacy Officer, Approach Ltd

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA explores cutting-edge research and theorising about young people's experiences and their social status in varied global contexts. It is unique in its sociological attention to childhood, children's rights, and children and young people's participation in society.

Students are introduced to internationally-renowned academic experts and international children's organisations and have the opportunity to explore their own areas of interest or professional practice.

The MA is based in UCL Social Science which houses three prestigious, research intensive units. Together they provide a foundation for world-leading work in childhood studies, social work, social pedagogy, families and health-related studies with a strong professional dimension.

Read less
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/. Read more
This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-gender-media-culture/

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

Sociology
Media and Communications
Humanities
Science and Technology Studies
Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Convenors

Autumn term convener - Nirmal Puwar
Spring term convener - Sara Ahmed

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Postgraduate Programmes Officer.

Modules & Structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
gender and migration and the new international division of labour
feminism
You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms.

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the following Departments across Goldsmiths. Not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Essays and dissertation.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
About the MSc Programme. This programme offers a flexible yet comprehensive introduction to the sociologies of risk and economic life, thereby providing a strong theoretical and methodological foundation for engaging in current discussions on the future of our societies. Read more

About the MSc Programme

This programme offers a flexible yet comprehensive introduction to the sociologies of risk and economic life, thereby providing a strong theoretical and methodological foundation for engaging in current discussions on the future of our societies.

It is an advanced sociology degree which focuses on risk and economic life. Understanding the challenges and possibilities confronted by contemporary societies – from technological disasters and natural catastrophes to novel forms of economic organisation and public participation – requires grasping the role and dynamics of economies and regulatory institutions in today’s world. 

The programme is unique in its breadth and diversity. It covers the most significant and recent developments in the sociologies of risk and economic life, and will enable you to develop critical skills that advance your knowledge of the socio-economic dynamics of contemporary societies. A compulsory course in Regulation, Risk and Economic Life will introduce you to key discussions on the nature of power, knowledge, organisations and markets. Through optional courses, you can further specialise in the sociology of risk and regulation, the sociology of markets, employment relations, and the sociology of science and technology.

Graduate destinations

This programme provides an excellent foundation for graduates seeking careers in academia, government and the civil service, research-oriented industries, and the non-governmental sector.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X