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Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics, London, United Kingdom

We have 75 Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics, London, United Kingdom

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This intercollegiate MA is taught in collaboration with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London. The programme draws on the wealth of expertise across the three colleges and students benefit from full access to all modules. Read more

This intercollegiate MA is taught in collaboration with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London. The programme draws on the wealth of expertise across the three colleges and students benefit from full access to all modules. The programme attracts European students and other students from overseas as well as the UK.

About this degree

The programme enables students to study in depth key aspects of the languages, literatures and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome (and their reception). It provides students with the skills of critical and conceptual thinking and equips them with the tools necessary for further research (including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a research methods module (non credit-bearing), three taught modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Research Methods

Optional modules

Choose three modules in the following areas of study:

  • Language
  • Literature
  • Reception
  • Religion and Philosophy
  • History
  • Art and Archaeology
  • Late Antique and Byzantine Studies

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in classical language, literature, thought or the classical tradition. The project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits). The project must display advanced knowledge of at least one of the classical languages.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught in small seminars or classes, rarely exceeding twelve participants. Students are expected to prepare for class each week, typically by reading preparatory material and texts in the original Greek or Latin. Student performance is assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Classics MA

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme, and students will find unique opportunities to acquire skills in the handling of documentary evidence particularly valuable for further research. Some students go on to pursue research at UCL or other institutions. Others have developed their skills in order to enter careers in e.g. teaching, publishing, the media, cultural heritage or the legal, business, charitable or financial sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Project Administrator, Horticultural Trades Association
  • GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), The University of Law
  • PhD in Classics, University of Cambridge
  • Associate Recruiter, Kite Consulting Group
  • PhD in Classical Studies, University of Michigan

Employability

The MA in Classics offers a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced oral communication; the ability to abstract and synthesise information, and to construct and manage arguments; independent and critical thinking on difficult issues; IT skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data); and good time management, organisational, and planning skills. Students go on to employment in many sectors including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world, with a large staff of international experts in Greek and Latin literature, papyrology, historical linguistics, philosophy, ancient history and classical reception. Its MA programmes open a pathway to a wide variety of careers.

The department is very well resourced for the study of the ancient world and UCL's central location provides unrivalled access to the British Museum, British Library, Senate House Library, Warburg Institute and the Institute of Classical Studies. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Greek & Latin

76% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Who is it for?. The MSc in Speech & Language Therapy is designed for students who are committed to a rewarding career in speech and language therapy. Read more

Who is it for?

The MSc in Speech & Language Therapy is designed for students who are committed to a rewarding career in speech and language therapy.

As a graduate with a first degree from a discipline outside healthcare, this course provides you with a fast-track route into health, enabling you to gain a pre-registration health qualification in two years as opposed to the usual three to four.

Ruth is a current Speech and Language Therapy student. Watch her video to find out more about her experiences and thoughts on life as a postgraduate student at City, University of London.

Objectives

City's MSc Speech and Language Therapy has an excellent reputation and is based within the largest, teaching, research and clinical division in the UK for language and communication science.

The MSc will help you:

  • Take a fast-track route into speech and language therapy
  • Learn a range of subjects to develop your understanding of typical speech, language, communication, swallowing and of pathologies in these areas
  • Integrate theoretical and real-world knowledge in considering approaches to the assessment and management of clients with communication and swallowing problems
  • Understand how to take a holistic approach to your clients’ needs
  • Gain real-world experience by undertaking clinical placements within a range of settings
  • Prepare for a career in a challenging and varied field – from working with autistic children and people who stammer to adults who have lost their speech following a stroke.

Accreditation

The MSc in Speech & Language Therapy is accredited by the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), which is the UK-wide regulatory body for healthcare professions.

On successfully completing the MSc Speech and Language Therapy you are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and practise as a speech and language therapist in the NHS and other settings.

Placements

The MSc Speech and Language Therapy course provides you with many opportunities for clinical practice, including attendance at health centres, schools, departmental clinics, special educational settings and hospitals throughout the London area.

Academic facilities

As an MSc student, you will have access to specialist labs and equipment, such as ultrasound and laryngographs to help you understand speech production and audiological equipment when learning about hearing and deafness.

The Roberta Williams Speech and Language Therapy Centre, opened in January 2016, is our specialist speech and language therapy clinic. The Centre contains state-of-the-art equipment to enable staff within the Division of Language and Communication Science to deliver cutting-edge research and services to patients.

Moodle is an enhanced Virtual Learning Environment which provides you with access to online course materials, resources, interactive activities, assessment and communication tools and is a key element of our blended learning approach, combining face-to-face teaching with online activity.

Teaching and learning

City's MSc Speech & Language Therapy has an excellent reputation and is based within the largest, teaching, research and clinical division in the UK for language and communication science.

You will learn with expert staff who are leaders in the field of speech and language therapy. The innovative and research-informed curriculum is supported by a busy in-house speech and language therapy clinic led by specialist staff. It is considered to be one of the leading educational environments in the world.

We also have close links with speech and language therapy services throughout London, with many practitioners from these services acting as clinical tutors on our courses.

The MSc in Speech & Language Therapy is a very intensive programme which requires full-time study by attending lectures, small-group problem-solving sessions, practical classes and tutorials. You will also have access to the most up-to-date equipment in the Speech Acoustics Laboratory and innovative online learning materials.

During your clinical placements, you will benefit from the supervision of a qualified therapist.

Assessment

Modules are assessed through a diverse range of assignments and examinations. Your clinical progress will also be monitored by supervising clinicians.

Modules

During the MSc Speech and Language Therapy course you will learn about the foundations of speech and language, about how children learn to talk and about disorders that affect communication.

A number of subjects equip you for the analysis of speech, language and hearing difficulties, such as phonetics, linguistics and audiology. You will also develop research skills and the ability to apply evidence based practice. You will undertake weekly and block clinical placements in both years of the course.

Modules

  • Articulatory Phonetics, Phonology and Speech Development
  • Bio-medical Sciences
  • Life Span Psychology and Research Methods
  • Speech Disorders, Dysfluency and Augmentative and Alternative
  • Dysphagia, Voice, Motor Speech Disorders, Dementia
  • Language Sciences: Linguistics and Language Development
  • Professional Studies A
  • Evidence Based Practice and Data Analysis
  • Acoustic Phonetics, Audiology and Deafness
  • Acquired and Developmental Language Disorders
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder, Learning Disability, Child Mental Health, Cerebral Palsy, Cleft Palate
  • Professional Studies B
  • Research Project

When you have successfully completed 13 modules totalling 240 credits you will qualify for an MSc Speech and Language Therapy.

Career prospects

On successfully completing the MSc Speech & Language Therapy, you will be able to join a profession that makes a real difference to people’s lives.

On successfully completing the MSc in Speech and Language Therapy, you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council and practise your profession within the NHS or in a range of other settings, including schools, hospitals, community clinics and charities.

A career in speech and language therapy offers opportunities to work with clients of all ages in settings such as:

  • Health centres.
  • Hospitals.
  • Schools.
  • Charities.
  • Universities.

Increasingly, many graduates also work in the private sector as independent speech and language therapists.



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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.



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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. Read more

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.
  • Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy and papyrology.

This course is ideal if you have previous training in a related subject in the humanities.

Course purpose

For students whose previous training has been in a related subject in the humanities. To give a grounding in the subject, normally with a language-training element in medieval Greek or Latin.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will give you six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of self-study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of self-study.

For your dissertation, we will give five hours of supervision each year, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of self-study.

Assessment

We will assess you through a combination of coursework and examinations. Typically, we will assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or three-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000-words of coursework, or a combination of coursework and examination. You will take 180 credits of modules over your programme.

Your dissertation will be a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Some of our graduates continue their research in our department and elsewhere in the UK, EU and US. Others transfer the skills and knowledge they develop to careers in teaching, cultural management, general management, civil service and banking. 



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This MRes prepares you for more advanced research projects at MPhil/PhD level, but is also a degree in its own right. It's ideal if you're considering a 'taster' year of research, or if you're keen to complete shorter term research at graduate level. . Read more

This MRes prepares you for more advanced research projects at MPhil/PhD level, but is also a degree in its own right. It's ideal if you're considering a 'taster' year of research, or if you're keen to complete shorter term research at graduate level. 

The aim of the MRes is to expand your knowledge and understanding of your chosen topic. You'll carry out independent research under the guidance of a supervisor, and in the context of a structured programme of study.

Structure

You'll attend the Department's Postgraduate Research Methods series, and either a Research Skills Workshopor a Research Skills series. You'll also be encouraged to attended Methods and Resources day schools that are offered by the Institute of English Studies at Senate House. 

You'll also attend, but not be assessed on, at least one appropriate Masters level module offered in the Department of English and Comparative Literature in the first term of study. Your supervisor may advise you to attend selected elements of the module only, and to focus on a particular problem within the syllabus. Attending the module will enable you to take part in discussions, and to refine and nuance your understanding of different perspectives on a topic. 

The main focus of the MRes, however, will be on the development of your own research project. Throughout this process you will: 

  • Study in depth and reflect critically upon an aspect of research methods relevant to your dissertation topic, under the guidance of your supervisor
  • Where appropriate, you can choose to write on methodological topics arising from the syllabus of one of the taught Masters level modules
  • Carry out systematic research into the primary, critical and theoretical literature relevant to the dissertation topic, under the guidance of your supervisor
  • Develop an independent dissertation project, under the guidance of a supervisor

Modules

You'll complete the following modules:

Research Methods

Assessed by one 5,000-6,000-word essay (or two 2,500-3,000-word essays). 

Bibliographical Exercise

Assessed by one 5,000-word essay. 

Dissertation 

Assessed by a 20,000-word dissertation. 

Assessment

A thesis of approximately 20,000 words will account for 80% of your final grade. The remaining 20% of your grade will be assessed through coursework. 

MPhil and PhD are examined by a longer thesis (about 60-80,000 words) and a viva voce examination.

Skills

This programme will enable you to develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information
  • the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in publishing, journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics. Read more

This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics.

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

  • language and ideology
  • linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
  • language and the media
  • talk at work
  • English in a multilingual world
  • intercultural communication
  • multilingualism and code-switching
  • varieties of English

You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Modules & structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules

Option modules

You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection.

Please note that your choice of option module from another department needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance. 

Dissertation

You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included: 

  • A critical investigation of metaphor in accent coaching internationalisation & the role of language
  • Gun Ownership as Freedom and Safety: Framing in the Blogosphere
  • Tweeting Saudi Women’s Elections: A Critical Discourse Analysis
  • Framing and discourses of gender and national identity in sports commentary
  • Discursive identity construction in relation to global hip hop culture in young men’s talk
  • Representations of aging in women’s magazines
  • Discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
  • Code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
  • Discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
  • Language and gender in dream narratives
  • Pauses and silences on Talk Radio
  • Attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
  • Representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
  • Political debates on Irish TV
  • Lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
  • The language of text messaging
  • Language and literacy practices on Facebook
  • Attitudes to non-standard language use
  • Discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
  • Gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends

The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize. 

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures as part of option modules and GoldLingS Seminar Series.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation; presentation

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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The MA in Applied Linguistics and ELT programme at St Mary’s has been running for more than 25 years and has helped develop the careers of hundreds of professionals in language teaching, management, publishing and research. Read more
The MA in Applied Linguistics and ELT programme at St Mary’s has been running for more than 25 years and has helped develop the careers of hundreds of professionals in language teaching, management, publishing and research.

The Applied Linguistics MA is designed primarily for teachers of English and of other modern languages who are interested in extending their knowledge of language and language teaching.

It provides participants with the opportunity to explore developments in applied linguistics and language teaching in the light of their own practical expertise and knowledge.

Why St Mary's?

This is a course with committed lecturers engaging with small groups, usually no more than 10-15 in each year. Compared to many other MA programmes in the UK this is a very low number and we have deliberately kept it small in order to keep the quality of our teaching high. We know all our students by name, and are able to give them a lot of individual attention and support.

We examine not only the subject of teaching, but also the nature of language from diverse theoretical, social and cognitive perspectives.

The content is demanding, but support is also strong. The rewards for students is great, both in how they learn to think about language and in their careers.

A Student View

Ute
"This Master's programme is an excellent educational experience. It is really fascinating and challenging and has enriched my life considerably. It has boosted my professional career, enhanced my self-esteem and helped me to become a critical thinker. The lecturers are very enthusiastic and highly knowledgeable in their fields; they are friendly and approachable and help you wherever they can."

Course Content

Students following the MA Programme have to complete six taught modules. In the full-time programme, three modules are taught per semester over one academic year. In the part-time programme in Berlin, three modules are taught in each of the two years.
The modules offered are likely to be:
› Language Theory
› English Language Description
› ELT Syllabus Design and Methodology
› Language Acquisition
› Sociolinguistics
› ELT Teacher Development and Management
› Research Methods and Dissertation

Please note: All information is correct at the time of publication. However, course content is regularly updated and this may result in some changes, which will be communicated to students before their programme begins.

Teaching and Assessment

To qualify for the MA you will need to be awarded 180 credits. There are six essays to complete, one for each module, and each worth 20 credits. The dissertation is worth 60 credits. The pass mark is 50%. Marks between 60% and 69% are in the merit category; marks over 70% are in the distinction category.

You will usually be taught in seminar groups of no more than 15 students. Small classes facilitate lively discussion and the forging of close and supportive academic relationships between students.

Full-time students attend three 2-hour seminars per week, currently timetabled for Thursdays and Fridays. In the Autumn semester, there is an additional Academic Orientation module that runs for six weeks. In the Spring semester there is an additional Research Methods module that runs for ten weeks.

We encourage an open and friendly relationship between students and staff. Students should feel free to make tutorial appointments with tutors, who are always happy to meet with them.

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Why study at Roehampton. The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom.
  • The University has a state-of-the-art language lab with cutting-edge translation software including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS.
  • You will have the option to study the localisation of computer games, equipping you to work in one of the UK’s fastest growing industries.
  • Roehampton’s location in London is ideal, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts.

The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Through working with dedicated software and high-tech industry standard equipment, you will learn the skills you need to enter the professional market and gain the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

There is a particular emphasis on learning translation tools (in particular SDL Trados) and on localisation, especially for video games. This programme is not limited to specific language pairs. You can work into and out of English and another language of your choice.

You will be taught by staff who are leaders in the field of translation and whose work has influenced organisations such as OFCOM. They work closely with industry and bring in key professionals in the field to teach and give talks, thus helping you to make vital industry contacts.

Roehampton boasts state-of-the-art language labs with cutting-edge translation software, including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS. The lab also features a training suite and an open access area where you can work independently.

In recent years our graduates have found work with a broad range of organisations including: media companies and broadcasters such as the BBC, France TV, and RTVE; subtitling companies such as IMS, Deluxe, ITFC; and translation and localisation providers including Pole To Win, London Translations and JF Traduções e Interpretações.

As a Specialised Translation student you will become a member of the Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, which promotes excellence in research into translation-related areas including language learning, audiovisual translation, accessibility to the media and other areas of translation.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of specialised translation. In the compulsory module ‘Technical and Scientific Translation’ you will practice your skills in translating highly specialised documents into your chosen language. During the course you will also address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation.

IT skills are central to a translator's work so the compulsory module ‘Translation Tools’ will familiarise you with some of the translation tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer-assisted translation systems. You will be taught how to carry out efficient documentation and make appropriate use of research tools in solving technical and scientific translation problems.

You could also study ‘The Localisation of Video Games’ where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. Other optional modules currently include ‘Subtitling: Concepts and Practice’, where you will explore the techniques of subtitle synchronisation using specialised software. MA students will also undertake a dissertation, which will provide you with the ideal opportunity to undertake an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic that is of interest to you.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S
  • Technical and Scientific Translation Module code: AST020L737A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Economic and Legal Translation Module code: AST020L738S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST020L749A
  • Think, Create, Translate: Transcreation in the Creative Industries Module code: AST020L724Y
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Specialised translator, subtitler, technical writer, editor, terminologist, project manager or localiser.

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The Translation and Interpreting MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages. Read more
The Translation and Interpreting MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish. The course will provide you with professional training aimed at the translation and interpreting markets, building on your existing language skills to develop a career in those sectors.

The course involves translation as well as conference and public service interpreting between one main language (Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish) and English. You will learn how to research specialised subjects for professional translation and interpreting purposes and hone your translation and interpreting skills by extensive practice, applying insights drawn from the study of linguistics and translation and interpreting theory as well as from professional practice. You will complete a Translation or Interpreting Project or a Research Thesis. You will also be able to choose from a range of option modules that will, for example, give you an introduction to audiovisual translation, intercultural communication, or sociolinguistics, or enable you to acquire a working knowledge of another language for translation purposes.

You will be able to benefit from our wide range of resources, including an extensive collection of volumes and electronic materials in our library, a state-of-the-art language lab and extensive interpreting facilities, and additional resources made available through the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Our teaching staff includes full and part-time lecturers, all with expertise in translation and interpreting and in other specialist fields. You will be allocated a personal tutor and be given academic guidance by the course team.

Course content

The course emphasis is on practical training in translation and interpreting, developing your skills to a high level and learning about the professional environments. If you are a native speaker of English, your translation modules will involve both institutional and technical translation from French, Italian, Polish or Spanish into English. If you are native speaker of Chinese, French, Italian, Polish or Spanish, your translation modules will cover institutional translation from and into your native language (commonly referred to as your 'first' or 'main' language). You will also study conference and public service interpreting, and learn new relevant skills through the option modules. You will also complete a research-based MA Thesis or an MA Translation or Interpreting Project. Your studies are further supported by regular student-led interpreting practice sessions and mock conferences, blended learning provision on developing your professionalism, weekly lectures on the theoretical concepts and principles of translation and interpreting, introductory workshops to a range of translation memory tools, and guest lectures and workshops delivered by external speakers from industry and international institutions.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONFERENCE INTERPRETING
-PUBLIC SERVICE INTERPRETING
-MAIN LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (INTO YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE)
-MAIN LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH ONLY)
-SECOND LANGUAGE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF CHINESE, FRENCH, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY)
-MA INTERPRETING PROJECT OR MA TRANSLATION PROJECT OR MA THESIS

Option modules
-ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE SKILLS FOR INTERPRETERS (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF CHINESE, FRENCH, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY)
-COMPUTER-ASSISTED TRANSLATION (CAT)
-EDITING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOVISUAL TRANSLATION
-MAIN LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF FRENCH, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY)
-SECOND LANGUAGE TECHNICAL TRANSLATION (NATIVE SPEAKERS OF FRENCH, ITALIAN, POLISH OR SPANISH ONLY)
-SOCIOLINGUISTICS
-SUBSIDIARY LANGUAGE (LANGUAGES SUBJECT TO ANNUAL CONFIRMATION)
-TRANSLATING CULTURES
-UNITED NATIONS AND EUROPEAN UNION FOR LINGUISTS
-ANALYSING SPOKEN AND WRITTEN DISCOURSE

[Associated careers

Graduates of the course go on to develop careers as freelance and in-house translators in the corporate sector and in national and international organisations, or as freelance interpreters, editors and revisers, subtitlers, terminologists, translation project managers, and specialists in translation tools.

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This pre-Master's course is a bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate study and will prepare you for studying a Master's degree at a UK university. Read more
This pre-Master's course is a bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate study and will prepare you for studying a Master's degree at a UK university. Through tailor-made courses and training, you will develop an appropriate level of understanding in the subject area you wish to study at postgraduate level. You will also practise postgraduate study skills, including project management, essay writing, research skills, critical analysis and presentation skills, and improve your language proficiency in English. You will develop professional communication skills for working in international contexts, enhance your intercultural competence and build your social and professional networks.

The programme aims to achieve a good balance between challenging and supporting you. In addition to structured learning, you have opportunities to take part in extra-curricular activities, such as professional networking events, workplace visits, and employability workshops to facilitate your career planning and intercultural learning.

If you complete this course satisfactorily, you are guaranteed progression onto one of over 20 Master's degrees at Birkbeck and, if you continue your studies to Master's level at Birkbeck, you will be entitled to a 10% discount on your Master's degree tuition fees.

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This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention. Read more

This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention.

About this degree

This programme provides students with the opportunity to draw on the strengths of a team with research expertise in literacy and experience in evaluating early literacy interventions. They will also investigate literacy acquisition and problems in depth, covering reading, writing and spelling.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) 

Core modules

There are two core modules and all students should take these to qualify for the MA. The dissertation or report are also compulsory. Both of these modules are taken in year one of the programme

  • Research Methods in Literacy
  • Literacy Development

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Reading and Spelling Difficulties
  • Literacy Practice in Writing and Comprehension

Students can also choose one or two optional Master's level modules from across the IOE offering.

Dissertation/report

All students submit either a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits).

Teaching and learning

Sessions for all modules are offered face-to-face in the evenings, supplemented by online discussion and reading. Dissertation/report group sessions are also delivered in the evening and are supplemented by one-to-one supervision. All 30-credit modules are assessed via the equivalent of a 4,000-word assignment.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as literacy co-ordinators and special educational needs co-ordinators, while others have jobs as literacy advisers and specialists. Graduates can also be found working as teachers and as independent literacy intervention tutors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Primary School Class Teacher (Early Years), Unspecified Primary School
  • Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO), Unspecified Literacy Centre
  • Primary School Class Teacher (Year 5), Unspecified Primary Academy
  • Special Education Deputy Head Teacher, Unspecified School

Employability

Students learn to diagnose a range of literacy difficulties and then to be able to consider appropriate interventions for those struggling with their reading and/or writing. Those graduating from the programme usually enhance their career prospects and can demonstrate a deeper understanding of literacy learning and supporting struggling readers and writers. Graduates usually move into co-ordinator/literacy management roles.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Learning and Leadership at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has developed an internationally-recognised reputation for early childhood and pre-school and primary education studies.

The department has a vibrant teaching programme and offers a range of enriching events including research seminars and conferences in the field of early childhood and primary education.

In all its work, the department is strongly committed to working in partnership with government agencies, education authorities, schools, early years and community groups and other departments within the IOE.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Learning & Leadership

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice. Read more

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA is for experienced teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice.

The study course offers you an excellent opportunity to further your career in TEFL/TESOL and develop expertise in specialist fields such as language assessment and testing, materials development, teaching EAP, management and evaluation and ESOL.

Please note that we also offer an alternative version of the Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA, in conjunction with International House London. That route involves a slightly different programme of study and leads to the award of the Cambridge DELTA, as well as the MA itself

Key benefits

  • Opportunities to expand your knowledge of current theoretical and practical aspects of language teaching.
  • Excellent tutorial support and extensive programme-specific training in research methods and academic writing.
  • Exchange ideas with other experienced language teaching professionals from many different backgrounds.
  • Opportunities to develop professional expertise relevant to your career development in areas such as EAP, teaching ESOL, materials development, language testing and assessment, teacher education.

Description

The Applied Linguistics & English Language Teaching MA course offers you opportunities to explore current research and specialist areas such as teacher education, materials development, teaching English for academic purposes, management and evaluation in ELT and intercultural studies.

You will study required modules covering language-teaching methodology and curriculum design, linguistic analysis for language teaching, issues in language acquisition and use (sociolinguistics, social and psychological aspects of second language learning) and research methods. We also place emphasis on the view of informed teaching and the need for teachers to mediate between theory and practice in constructing pedagogies according to specific teaching-learning situations.

If you are studying full-time, you will complete the 180-195 credit course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. If you have the Cambridge ESOL DELTA or Trinity House Diploma in ELT, you may be eligible for the ‘fast track’ version of the course which will give you exemption from Principles and Practices in Second/Foreign Language Teaching. The fast track option can only be studied part-time. As students on this pathway are exempt from a module, they will not take any taught modules in one of the terms (normally Term 1 of Year 2). They may, however, be working on their dissertation during this time. 

Course purpose

For experienced language teachers who want to reflect upon and further develop their understanding of the various theoretical and practical issues that impact on the field of language learning and teaching.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. The total contact time for each 30-credit taught module is typically 40 hours (20 hours per 15 credit module). These sessions will include lectures, teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study, in addition to other practical, technical and analytical activities. Each 30-credit taught module has 260 hours of self-guided learning time (130 hours for a 15 credit taught module). Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

For the dissertation module, you will receive six hours of one-to-one dissertation supervision. Lectures involving research methods will involve an additional 20 hours of contact time, to complement the 574 hours of self-study.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of essays, language analysis tasks, exams and oral presentations. Most optional modules are assessed by a 3,500-word essay. The dissertation will be assessed by one 15,000-word extended piece of writing. The format of your optional module assessment will depend on the options chosen.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates from the Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA course choose to remain in further education and go on to follow MPhil/PhD pathways.



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This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. Read more
This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to both experience the great range of ancient historical studies and to specialise in key areas. We offer units on periods from Near Eastern History to the Byzantine Empire and a vast range of methodologies are deployed and sources considered.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of fascinating subjects. You will study from an exciting menu of units which covers not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maancienthistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Classics & Philosophy Department at Royal Holloway is a thriving and internationally recognised research centre.

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Research in the Department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire

- In Ancient History, we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: the history of Greek law, Athenian political and social history, the Roman army, ancient shipping and shipsheds, and ancient urbanism, and both Greek and Latin epigraphy.

Course content and structure

Students study one core unit and two elective course units, and prepare a dissertation. At least one of the elective units should be in Ancient History, as should the dissertation. Courses available cover a range of subjects from ancient Greece and Rome to Egypt, as well as offering skills in language acquisition and epigraphy. For more information about the course units please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of ancient history

-an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

a critical awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics/ancient history related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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