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Masters Degrees in Intellectual History, London, United Kingdom

We have 9 Masters Degrees in Intellectual History, London, United Kingdom

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Queen Mary University of London School of History
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This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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Queen Mary University of London School of History
Distance from London: 0 miles
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History). (MA title is subject to approval). The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. Read more
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History)

(MA title is subject to approval)

The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. It trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in premodern and modern society.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students
take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Optional modules may include:

Modern Jewish History and Culture
Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600
Jews, Power and Intellectual History
Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Modern European Jewish Literature
Hollywood and the Second World War
Understanding Religion Historically
Overcoming Nazism

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University College London Department of History
Distance from London: 0 miles
The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Read more
The Dutch Golden Age MA is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the history and culture of the Netherlands in the early modern period, focusing on the Dutch Republic during its 17th-century efflorescence. Jointly offered by UCL, King's College London, and the Courtauld Institute, the programme draws on the full range of resources and expertise in London for study of this subject.

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Advanced
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

This interdisciplinary programme combines three fields: history, art history, and Dutch language and literature. It aims to provide a knowledge and understanding of the political, economic, cultural and religious history of the Netherlands in the period c.1550–1700.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three or four core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and the research dissertation (90 credits).

- Core Modules
Research Skills Seminar
Literature of the Dutch Golden Age
or one module on the history of Dutch art

- Recent optional modules included:
Dutch Genre Painting
From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands c.1555-1609
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
Signs, Mind and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language
The Body Between Art and Science
Golden Age Kingship: Theory and Practice
Transformation of Jewish Culture in Early Modern Europe

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project based on 16th and/or 17th-century (primary) resources, which culminates in a dissertation up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and Learning

The programme takes the form of lectures, small-group seminars and individual tutorials. Through the research skills seminar students will visit various libraries and collections, in particular the Institute for Historical Research, British Library, and Warburg Institute. Assessment is through written coursework essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Dutch Golden Age MA http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_dutch_golden_age

Funding

For the most recent information on funding available for 2015/16 entry please see the UCL HIstory website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_funding .

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Carol Chattaway Scholarship
Value: £2,500 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Furlong Bursary for MA Study in the Ancient Near East
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

- Jean Orr Scholarship
Value: £7,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK, EU, Overseas students
Criteria: Based on academic merit

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

First destinations of recent graduates of the programme include: East Side Community Heritage; Volunteer, Warburg Institute; University of London: Research Degree in Art History; and University of Amsterdam: PhD Golden in the Age in Dutch Art.

- Employability
This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading historians.

Students benefit from London's extraordinary resources, including major collections of Dutch and Flemish art. The British Library, within walking distance of UCL, houses the largest collection of Dutch books anywhere outside the Low Countries.

Student / staff ratios › 39 staff including 8 postdocs › 101 taught students › 46 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suitable for students with a first degree in a relevant arts, humanities or social science discipline. Prior knowledge of the Dutch language is not required; depending on their linguistic skills, students will be placed in one of three language/literature courses and trained in the reading of Dutch texts.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at graduate level
- why you want to study Dutch Golden Age at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your academic background meets the demands of a challenging academic environment
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Read more
History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Postgraduate study in this area trains you at a high level in looking at, thinking about and researching art and its histories.

Birkbeck's MA History of Art offers the opportunity to study with internationally recognised experts. Our teaching staff are defining the field, conducting ground-breaking research in periods from medieval to contemporary, focusing on painting, sculpture, print culture, architecture, photography, digital art and museology.

The MA History of Art exposes you to key art historical approaches, and allows you to focus in depth on areas and periods of particular interest to you, in early and modern (including contemporary) periods, through taught options (see an indicative list of modules on the 'course structure' tab) and independent research. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

The course develops your visual acuity and your understanding of art's histories, while stimulating critical debate and stretching your research skills. In addition to independent written work, you will take part in group discussion, give oral presentations and engage with the Department of History of Art's research culture.

In all of this, you will work closely with our staff while also benefiting from our diverse and vibrant student body of all ages and backgrounds. The teaching programme is enriched by museum and site visits, visiting speakers, screenings and opportunities to get involved as volunteers in research and community outreach activities. The department also offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray Lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
You will work closely with leading international experts in the history of art.
You can choose to specialise in a wide range of periods and geographies, from medieval European architecture and cityscapes to contemporary global art practices.
You can study flexibly, full-time or part-time, with all teaching in the evenings.
On class visits and in your independent research you will have access to London's world-class art collections, museums and libraries.
Your fellow students are from a wide range of backgrounds and are often already working in the field, offering a high level of discussion and excellent networking opportunities.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house resources centre. In addition, our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
You will also have easy access to specialist art libraries not far from Birkbeck, including the library of the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Royal Institute of British Architects library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), as well as the great visual resources of the British Museum, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A, commercial galleries and salesrooms. Temporary exhibition galleries like the Barbican Gallery, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery and Royal Academy also make London a particularly good place in which to undertake research.
You can participate in the rich research culture of the Department of History of Art.
Keep up-to-date with our research on the Birkbeck History of Art blog.

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This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Choosing specialisms within European thought, society, history and politics you will develop discipline-specific skills and regional expertise, while the interdisciplinary programme structure encourages you to think across boundaries, gaining an expansive overview of the continent.

About this degree

From Marx to Foucault, Bakhtin to Durkheim, European thinkers have helped to influence the ways in which we understand texts and communication, individuals and societies. This pathway encourages graduates to investigate a panoply of ideas and theories, and their applications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research.

The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), four optional inter-faculty modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two inter-faculty optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four inter-faculty optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
  • Social Theory

Optional modules

Students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two of the following inter-faculty optional modules:

  • Relevant modules - UCL Arts & Humanities Faculty
  • Relevant modules - UCL Social & Historical Sciences Faculty
  • Relevant modules - UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000-words, or 18,000-words for the Research pathway.

Teaching and learning

Key aspects of European theory and culture are taught through participation in lectures and seminars. Through feedback sessions on presentations and essays, students are encouraged to reflect on, and improve, their own work. Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, unseen written examinations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: European Culture and Thought: Thought MA

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme; both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right. Outside academia, potential careers may include politics, business, commerce, teaching, public relations, or journalism.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • PhD in European Culture, UCL
  • PhD in Gentrification, University of Leicester

Employability

Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, and with such a wide range of resources, this is a highly favourable location for the study of Europe.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. Read more

This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

About this degree

The programme aims to equip students with the skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for most fields of European culture, society and thought, encompassing the events, traditions and texts of the entire continent. Students learn how to present material effectively, to analyse texts critically and to construct coherent arguments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research. The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits) four optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, two core modules (60 credits), full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core modules

  • Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
  • Topics in Cultural Studies

Optional modules

Students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two, of the following optional modules:

  • Modern Literary Theory
  • Comparative Literature Studies
  • Social Theory
  • Topics in Cultural Studies
  • Graduate modules from the Faculty of Arts & Humanities
  • Graduate modules from the Faculty of Social & Historical Sciences
  • Graduate modules from the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words (Taught pathway) or 18,000-words (Research pathway).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. All students receive guidance on how to identify, locate and use material available in libraries and archives. Students are assessed through a combination of coursework in the form of essays, unseen written examinations and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: European Culture and Thought: Culture MA

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right.

Many graduates of the programme have gone on to further study at UCL and other institutions, including the University of Edinburgh; London Consortium; Birkbeck, University of London; and the Louvre Museum.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • South Asia Researcher, Justice and Peace
  • Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
  • Proof Reader, Profiles Creative

Employability

Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is in a unique position to combine a broad programme of study that unites the arts, humanities, and social and historical sciences, with immediate and easy access to the unrivalled cultural treasures and library holdings of London.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, and with the wide range of resources available, this is a highly favourable location for the study of Europe.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Want to master the art of persuasion? If you’re also looking for a postgraduate degree course that equips you with the transferable skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication, then this course is for you. Read more

Want to master the art of persuasion? If you’re also looking for a postgraduate degree course that equips you with the transferable skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication, then this course is for you.

The only course of its kind to be offered by a major UK university, this one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric is designed for all students, not just those with a background in classics. It is ideal for those looking for onward progression into a career or further studies where an ability to construct and deliver persuasive arguments, as well as analyse and evaluate those presented by others, is key.

Combining both ancient and modern fields of research, the course is taught at the Centre of Oratory and Rhetoric in the Royal Holloway Classics Department. With the primary emphasis on the practice of oratory, the course draws on the department’s scholarly expertise to deliver a core module on Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric plus a wide range of complementary optional courses. Add to that access to experts in rhetoric and oratory from around the world as well as world-class research resources and we guarantee MRes Rhetoric students will finish the course equipped with a range of analytical and research skills, fully adept in the art of persuasion. 

Course structure

Core modules

  • Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric
  • Independent Project on Rhetoric 1
  • Independent Project on Rhetoric 2
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Oratory and Identity

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. 

Your future career

Graduates of classical degrees have much to offer potential employers having developed a range of transferable skills, both practical and theoretical, whilst studying with us. With up to 90% of our most recent graduates now working or in further study, according to the Complete University Guide 2015, it’s true to say our graduates are highly employable.

In recent years, PhD graduates, many of whom have progressed from our MA programmes, have taken up academic positions at Oxford, Bristol and Roehampton Universities. Outside of academia, our graduates have embarked on teaching careers in the UK and overseas, undertaken archaeological and museum work and pursued careers in journalism, finance, politics and the arts.

With the MRes Rhetoric course designed to equip you with the skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication graduates are best placed for continuing onto PhD studies or for pursuing non-academic careers, especially those involving communication (such as law, politics, the media, advertising, or teaching).



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In this MA programme, students explore political and philosophical debates that have influenced learning and teaching in citizenship, history and religious education. Read more

In this MA programme, students explore political and philosophical debates that have influenced learning and teaching in citizenship, history and religious education. Students nominate one of these subjects as their main specialism, and are encouraged and enabled to critically reflect on principles and issues that relate to policy and professional practice in their specialist subject.

About this degree

Students explore the key concepts involved in understanding education in their subject specialism, of Citizenship, History or Religious Education. They will develop an understanding of contemporary issues and key research findings associated with their subject specialism and related areas, and be supported to apply this knowledge in practice and in wider school life. In addition to a main subject, students can choose to nominate a second 'minor' specialism.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), and either two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules

Students take one core module and one subject-specific compulsory module. Subject-specific compulsory modules vary each year. Please see below for the core module (listed first), followed by the subject-specific compulsory modules for 2018/19.

  • What is Education?
  • Learning to Live Together: Children’s Rights, Citizenship and Identities
  • Effective Learning in History
  • Issues and Debates in Religious Education

Optional modules

Students choose either two or three optional modules from a range available either within the programme or from the wider UCL Institute of Education (IOE) offering. 

Please contact the Programme Leader for advice about optional modules. 

Dissertation/report

All students submit either a 2,000-word proposal and a 17,000-word dissertation, or a 1,500-word proposal and 8,000-word report.

Teaching and learning

The dissertation/report module includes an online ‘Integrated Research Methods’ course which students take at the beginning.

Students are allocated a dissertation/report supervisor. For most of the module, teaching and learning takes place through regular one-to-one research supervision. These supervisions can be conducted face-to-face and/or via distance learning. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Citizenship, History or Religious Education (Humanities) MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers, senior leaders and head teachers in schools (in the UK and internationally), while others work for governments in curriculum design. At least one graduate from this programme can be found working as a senior officer for the United Nations Development Programme.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Department Manager, George Washington University
  • Humanities and History Co-ordinator, Singapore International School
  • Secondary School Teacher, North London Secondary School
  • Teacher (History), Unspecified Primary School

Employability

The programme develops students' ability to think critically and analytically about theory and practice in educational settings and the ability to organise and evaluate empirical and theoretical claims and arguments about educational aims and practices. Students learn to organise, evaluate and present data and argument in robust and critically informed ways and to read, design, conduct and evaluate educational research, taking account of relevant practical, theoretical and ethical issues. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is located in the Department of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment, a world-leading centre for subject-specialist education. By studying this MA you will have the opportunity to reflect on practice in your chosen subject specialism – Citizenship, History or Religious Education - and, through assignments focused on contemporary subject-specific teaching and learning, you will have opportunities to develop and evaluate interventions to enhance teaching and learning in your subject specialism. You will be encouraged to read widely specialist literature, to innovate and test ideas and to contribute to ongoing discussions about improving subject-specialist education.

Our programme offers students the opportunity to combine online study with face-to-face sessions, or to pursue their studies entirely by online learning. We recognise that many students value face-to-face interaction, and most of our modules include a small number of seminars at UCL Institute of Education. There is scope however for online interaction for those participating from a distance.

Most students will exit the programme with a Master's degree in Citizenship Education, History Education, or Religious Education. Depending on the combination of modules taken, some students may be able to exit with an MA in two subjects (major/minor). Please contact the Programme Leader for further information.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Curriculum, Pedagogy & Assessment

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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