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Masters Degrees in Information Services, London, United Kingdom

We have 32 Masters Degrees in Information Services, London, United Kingdom

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Who is it for?. This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to start or develop a career working with digital technologies and media to manage information resources, systems and services. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to start or develop a career working with digital technologies and media to manage information resources, systems and services. The course is also ideal for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the information sector.

Information Science is a broad, interdisciplinary field, which is relevant and applicable to all disciplines. Information Scientists may work in any organisation that collects and processes information of any kind. Whilst it has its origins in the handling of the scientific and technical literature, today the subject appeals to those who enjoy working with information resources of all kinds, and who have an aptitude for the technological systems and processes related to information storage, preservation, discovery and access.

Accreditation

City's Information Science course is approved by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). CILIP accredited courses are recognised by the American Library Association (ALA) and The Australian Library and Information Association, which means that our graduates are qualified to apply for posts requiring professional level qualifications in these countries.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use are designed to allow your specialist knowledge and autonomy to develop as you progress through the course.

Teaching at CityLIS takes place on Mondays and Fridays, during each of the two, 10 week teaching terms. Full-time students attend on both days. Part-time students attend on Mondays in year one, and Fridays in year two. Classes may be scheduled anytime between 09.00 and 18.00, although we usually try to work between 10.00 and 17.00.

Taught modules are usually delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures. Lectures are normally used to:

  • present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject
  • highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus
  • indicate additional topics and resources for private study

City's online learning environment, Moodle, contains resources to support face-to-face lectures, including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

In addition to lectures, you will have the opportunity to attend course-related workshops and seminars. You also will have access to a personal tutor, an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This will amount to approximately 120 hours of study per module, in addition to class attendance. Each of the modules run by CityLIS is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations. Elective modules may be assessed by examination.

On successful completion of the course's eight taught modules, you will undertake your dissertation. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The dissertation allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results, solutions and recommendations on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is where you can apply what you have learnt to a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in information science.

Communication and networking are an integral part of our Information Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you will be expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communications media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You will be encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

Modules

The MSc in Information Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. While we aim to run all of our advertised electives, we reserve the right to cancel an elective should this be necessary. For example, if very few students choose it. Some electives are offered by other departments, who may need to restrict access to very popular electives (though this has not happened in recent years). Please note that as some electives run on different days, students who can only attend on one day per week may be restricted in their choice of elective module.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be as lectures, seminars, group work, discussion, practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of 8 taught modules, you can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

The MSc in Information Science covers:

  • history of information science
  • social-cultural impact of information science
  • information organisation
  • metadata
  • data visualisation
  • information resources
  • information law and ethics
  • information retrieval
  • information technologies
  • information management
  • information literacy
  • research methods
  • information services


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This MRes is aimed at those wishing to broaden or deepen understanding of aspects of the information world at postgraduate level, or to prepare for doctoral studies. Read more

This MRes is aimed at those wishing to broaden or deepen understanding of aspects of the information world at postgraduate level, or to prepare for doctoral studies. It is also aimed at mid-career information and cultural professionals who wish to develop their leadership, management and professional skills.

About this degree

This is a flexible programme of study combining information disciplines, information technology, leadership, management and professional skills. The programme is tailored to individual needs, closely related to students' current or future employment or research goals. Through research skills classes and a substantial research project, students develop skills for further study and career development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (120 credits).

Core modules

  • There are no core modules for this programme.

Optional modules

Students select in conjunction with their Director of Studies, four modules from the range of postgraduate programmes offered by the Department of Information Studies. Typically, the selection is made across the following areas:

  • Management of Services, Resources or Systems
  • Information and Communication Systems and Technologies
  • Adult Learning and Professional Development
  • Archives and Records Management
  • Digital Humanities
  • Information Services for Specialist Media or Users
  • Information Sources, Organisation and Retrieval
  • Publishing
  • Cultural Heritage

The full range of postgraduate modules is available on the UCL Information Studies website. On occasion it may be appropriate for students to take modules offered by another UCL department also.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an applied or theoretical area of information work, which culminates in a dissertation of 25,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Taught modules are delivered through lectures, seminars, groupwork and practicals. Research skills are developed through classes within the department and students are encouraged to take courses run by UCL Doctoral School. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments and by the dissertation and viva voce.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Information Studies MRes

Careers

The programme provides an ideal foundation for further doctoral research, as a preparation for an MPhil or PhD, and enables career development of information professionals into senior and managerial roles. 

Places of employment or further study of recent students include:

  • Staffordshire County Council
  • National Library of Portugal
  • University of Botswana
  • UCL.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Information Studies is unique in the UK with programmes spanning archives, records management, information studies and systems, digital humanities and publishing. Students have unparalleled opportunities for cross-domain engagement and the opportunity to work with other departments at UCL.

Students benefit from UCL's central London location, and many premier information and cultural institutions are within easy reach. Staff are experts in their field and closely involved with the professional bodies and companies, supporting students in building contacts and widening experience.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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University College London UCL Qatar
Distance from London: 0 miles
Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. Read more

Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. This ground-breaking MA aims to nurture a world-class cadre of library professionals and train the future leaders of the sector.

About this degree

The programme provides students with an awareness of current issues and trends in library and information work. It fosters understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded, and equips students with practical skills for the identification, location, management and organisation of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is also offered. Students complete all modules except the dissertation.

Core modules

  • Knowledge Organisation and Access
  • Collection Management
  • Research Methods in Information and Library Science
  • Reference and Information Services
  • Introduction to Management
  • Professional Awareness
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Students choose two modules from the following:

  • The Book in the World
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Information Literacy
  • Interdisciplinary Methods for the Study of Cultural Heritage
  • Introduction to Archives and Preservation
  • Islamic Manuscripts
  • Library Systems and Data Management
  • Services to Children and Young People

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, private reading, seminars, practical classes, small group work, group project work, computer laboratory sessions, essay writing, and independent research. Except for short courses, all programmes are delivered in afternoon sessions. Students can access and use the virtual learning environment (Moodle) at UCL, which provides the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of UCL staff both in London and Qatar. Intensive short courses will also be delivered by visiting staff from UCL Information Studies (London). Assessment takes a variety of forms including: essays, portfolios, prepared practical work, individual and group project work, report writing, policy writing, presentations, peer assessment and the dissertation. There is also a written examination, attached to the professional awareness module, and accounting for 50% of the marks.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Library and Information Studies (UCL Qatar) MA

Careers

Graduates will be equipped to work in a wide network of settings including school libraries, libraries based in government ministries, and many more libraries in institutions such as museums and societies, and countless business libraries and archives.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar has become the first degree programme of its kind in the region to be formally accredited by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The MA in Library and Information Studies is identical to the programme offered by UCL Information Studies in London – the UK’s largest facility for the teaching of library and information studies.

Students have the opportunity to network with leading library professionals from Qatar and the region and will undertake a placement in a local or international library.

Qatar is investing heavily in libraries, infrastructure and capacity building. This is an exceptionally exciting period for students and professionals who are looking to develop their career in the region.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Who is it for?. This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to work in a library, or similar collection-orientated organisation. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to work in a library, or similar collection-orientated organisation. It is also suitable for anyone wishing to update their knowledge and skills, in order to progress a career based around collections and services within galleries, libraries, museums and archives.

Library Science is a broad, interdisciplinary subject, the principles and practice of which underpin today’s information society. It appeals to students with an eye for detail, an interest in the organisation, technologies, and communication of information, and in understanding the organisational and wider social impacts of information policy, access and provision.

Accreditation

City’s Library Science course is approved by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). CILIP accredited courses are recognised by the American Library Association (ALA) and The Australian Library and Information Association, which means that our graduates are qualified to apply for posts requiring professional level qualifications in the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use are designed to allow your specialist knowledge and autonomy to develop as you progress through the course.

Teaching at CityLIS takes place on Mondays and Fridays, during each of the two, 10 week teaching terms. Full-time students attend on both days. Part-time students attend on Mondays in year one, and Fridays in year two. Classes may be scheduled anytime between 09.00 and 18.00, although we usually try to work between 10.00 and 17.00.

Taught modules are usually delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures. Lectures are normally used to:

  • present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject
  • highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus
  • indicate additional topics and resources for private study

City’s online learning environment, Moodle, contains resources to support face-to-face lectures, including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

In addition to lectures, you will have the opportunity to attend course-related workshops and seminars. You also will have access to a personal tutor, an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This will amount to approximately 120 hours of study per module, in addition to class attendance. Each of the modules run by CityLIS is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations. Elective modules may be assessed by examination.

On successful completion of the course’s eight taught modules, you will undertake your dissertation. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The dissertation allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results, solutions and recommendations on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is where you can apply what you have learnt to a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Communication and networking are an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you will be expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communications media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You will be encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. While we aim to run all of our advertised electives, we reserve the right to cancel an elective should this be necessary. For example, if very few students choose it. Some electives are offered by other departments, who may need to restrict access to very popular electives (though this has not happened in recent years). Please note that as some electives run on different days, students who can only attend on one day per week may be restricted in their choice of elective module.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The MA/MSc in Library Science covers:

  • library history
  • social-cultural impact of libraries and library services
  • information resources
  • collection management
  • cataloguing and classification
  • metadata
  • information law and ethics
  • digital libraries
  • information technologies
  • information literacy
  • libraries and publishing
  • research methods


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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more

The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

About this degree

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focusing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
  • Creation and Capture
  • Curation and Stewardship
  • The Record-keeping Professional
  • Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include

  • Collections Care
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Information Governance
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
  • Database Systems and Design
  • Oral History

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, and practical assignments.

Placement

The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capturecore module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archives and Records Management MA

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Archivist, Beaulieu
  • Senior Digital Archivist, The National Archives
  • Archivist, Royal Asiatic Society
  • Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)
  • Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces

Employability

This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Course Overview. This masters degree course in Cyber Security is being offered by the School of Computing and Engineering and has been developed in response to a high demand for cyber security professionals with systematic understanding of the principles and technologies underpinning today's IT systems. Read more

Course Overview

This masters degree course in Cyber Security is being offered by the School of Computing and Engineering and has been developed in response to a high demand for cyber security professionals with systematic understanding of the principles and technologies underpinning today's IT systems.

The School of Computing and Engineering has partnered with leaders within the security industry to provide you with a course which will enable you to gain comprehensive knowledge and critical skills in computer security. This course will enable you to pursue a career as a cyber security professional in either the public or the private sector.

Why choose this course?

This course is offered with a 6 months internship. The internship on the course will allow you to gain first hand work experience within the industry, it will enable you to improve and acquire new skills. Throughout the internship you will be encourages to explore various career opportunities, network and work with others as part of a team. It will also enhance your understanding of the world and what constitutes professional practice in the workplace.

In today’s digital world cyber security plays an integral role, people trained in this field are greatly sought after and the course is designed to meet the huge market demand for cyber security professionals. Partnering with leading security industry, this course combines theory and practice, balancing cutting-edge security technologies and solutions with concepts and principles of cyber security.

The course aims to develop your ability to analyse the legal, social, ethical and professional issues involved in the human aspects of cyber security and be guided by the adoption of appropriate professional, ethical and legal practices. 

The course aims to develop your critical skills and techniques to appropriately solve typical cyber security problems, enabling you to choose from a range of security related jobs/roles in a rapidly evolving and diverse environment.

This course provides routes into a diverse range of career opportunities in the information and communications technology (ICT) industry and in organisations that are data and knowledge intensive. Employers require information security officers at all levels including:

  • Chief Information Security Officer
  • Network and Computer Security Engineers
  • Security Managers and Consultants
  • Penetration Testers
  • Cybersecurity Analysts
  • Security Investigators
  • Security Researchers.

You will have access to laboratories and dedicated ICT suites with specialist networks and software as well as excellent resources for study space and meetings.

Modules

  • Fundamentals of Cyber Security
  • Security Management
  • Network and Systems Security
  • Research Methods
  • Learning and Professional Development 
  • Employability Skills and Employment
  • Dissertation

Optional Modules:

  • Distributed Application Development 
  • Mobile Web Component Development 
  • Principles of Project Management 
  • Consultancy and Technical Innovation 
  • Security Operations and Assurance 
  • Data Architecture
  • Knowledge Management

Career and study progression

The security industry includes government and law enforcement as well as providers of equipment and services, such as the:

  • anti-virus, security software vendors (such as McAfee, Kaspersky, Symantec, Sophos)
  • network and computer vendors (such as Cisco, Juniper, Palo Alto, HP, Barracuda)
  • network and service providers (such as British Telecom, Vodafone, Rackspace, Amazon)
  • consultancies (such as KPMG, IBM, Fujitsu, HP)

The School of Computing and Engineering also has a growing research and enterprise culture with thirty PhD students as well as a diversity of research groups.

Outstanding graduates can continue their studies at the level of MPhil and PhD at UWL.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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This course is aimed at media graduates with an ambition to create and market their own product or services. This course is ideal for you if you wish to start your own media enterprise. Read more

This course is aimed at media graduates with an ambition to create and market their own product or services. This course is ideal for you if you wish to start your own media enterprise.

The course comprises five modules: two media business modules, two creative practice modules and a final project that is expected to achieve a professional standard and be ready for commissioning or financial backing. The course provides a comprehensive theoretical and practical understanding of contemporary creative media that will support and motivate students to realise their professional ambitions.

Why choose this course?

MA Creative Media Start Up is very much focused on providing ambitious and enterprise-oriented students with the knowledge and skills to operate as independent production professionals for a range of clients, across a wide range of media outputs and with the agility to adapt to a rapidly evolving media landscape.

The course is designed to produce graduates with advanced skills aligned to a high degree of knowledge of contemporary media markets and business practices that will help them realise their ambition of launching a product, service or their own independent business.

The vast majority of employers across media production have moved away from permanent employment contracts towards a culture of short-term, project-specific contracts that favours freelancers, self-employed contractors and independent producers.

The course modules are designed to progress you from theory through to implementation and provide a substantial bridge between ambition and the actual conditions encountered in the market and in contemporary practices, such as IP development, commissioning and delivery.

The final project expresses this new knowledge by creating a product, service or business plan that is ready to take to market. Our graduates are expected to leave with a project portfolio that is ready for commissioning or financing.

On completing the course you will have acquired a comprehensive and critical understanding of media production work within competitive markets, plus the ability to critically analyse and evaluate your own strengths and weaknesses as independent practitioners.

Modules

  • Professional Business
  • Creative 1: Working Ideas
  • Professional Business 2: Implementing Plans
  • Creative 2: USP, Commissioning and Delivery, plus preliminary project work
  • Final Project.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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Goldsmiths, University of London Department of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. Read more

The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area.

This two-part programme is designed to develop professional and academic excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. It's aimed at curators and those with related academic and practical experience who wish to achieve professional excellence in their practice, to innovate in the expanding field of curatorial practice.

MFA Curating at Goldsmiths focuses in-depth on aesthetic, social, political and philosophical questions that are brought to bear in any place or at any event in which contemporary art is situated.

The programme is designed to provide a practice-led research context for students at any stage of their professional practice. 

It also enables you to experiment and innovate in the expanded field of curatorial pedagogy, to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis and extend your and other students' knowledge through this process.

Goldsmiths' MFA Curating programme is recognised worldwide for producing highly qualified curators and other arts professionals.

Our graduates find employment in top international museums, commercial galleries, auction houses, magazines, alternative spaces and not-for-profit organisations. Others choose employment as artist’s studio managers; arts education programmers; museum public talks and events organisers; gallery archivists and registrars.

Work experience

The Tate Modern annually offers two hands-on internships to Goldsmiths MFA Curating students, who are given the opportunity to work directly on an exhibition matched to the students' interests. Accepted Goldsmiths curating students are given details on how to apply for a Tate Modern internship prior to starting the school year.

Other institutions with which the Goldsmiths MFA Curating programme has collaborated on real-life curatorial projects include 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London; Form/Content, London; ICA/Fourth Plinth Project, London, and more.

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Modules & structure

In Year One, you're introduced to a series of curatorial concepts and practices through group analysis and guided research. There are also group seminars that look into significant ideas in philosophy and cultural theory to help you think broadly about your own practice

In Year Two, intensive workshops look in depth at a set of artistic and cultural themes chosen by the students. In Year Two you further develop independent curatorial research and practice, working either on your own ideas or with a London-based gallery or institution. The summer term of Year One acts as a transition to Year Two.

Government Art Collection

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Year one

Year two

Skills

Independent research and practice; public presentation; oral and written communication; project development; exhibition administration; concept development; collaboration; intellectual analysis; catalogue, essay and review writing; research organisation and presentation.

Careers

Graudates from the MFA in Curating go on to work in galleries and museums; as managers and directors in commercial galleries; independent curators; cultural policy makers, teachers and academics; writers and critics.



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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Read more
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Through its projects at the Design Museum and with prestigious cultural organisations, including the British Council, Architecture Foundation, British Museum and the V&A, the course gives you the opportunity to curate live projects and build your own professional profile. Ambitious international projects are an integral part of the curriculum, and graduates have gone on to successful careers around the world.

Key features]
-As the course is taught in partnership with the Design Museum, London, you will benefit from the experience of studying at one of the world's best-known design museums.
-Professional practice modules at the Design Museum underpin modules on the history and theory of curating design taught at Kingston University.
-Work experience and study visits are an important part of the course.

What will you study?

You will gain a grounding in the professional aspects of curatorial practice as well as first-hand experience in planning and organising exhibitions. This practical experience will be supported by modules in history and theory, ensuring you have a thorough knowledge of the ideas and context underpinning the display and curating of contemporary designed objects. There is a strong emphasis on gaining key employability skills for the sector, ensuring a high level of professional development. We develop live projects with leading organisations such as the British Council, Crafts Council and V&A Museum.

Assessment

Curatorial project briefs, seminar presentations, essays, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Professional Practice
-Interpreting Contemporary Design
-Theory of the Contemporary Object
-Making of the Modern World
-Curating Contemporary Design Dissertation and/or Project

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The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. Read more

The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. This programme also enables international collaborations to take place across the academic and professional field of museum studies.

About this degree

The programme enables students to carry out a practical and theoretical study on education in museums and galleries. University-based sessions are supplemented by teaching sessions at national, regional and university collections. Additionally students gain flexible access to historic and contemporary sites and full-time students have a 20-day research-based placement in a museum, gallery or heritage site.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation and portfolio (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Issues in Museum Studies
  • Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice

Optional modules

  • Alternative Models for Art Education
  • Constructing and Interpreting Heritage Culture
  • Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
  • Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 14,000 words with a portfolio equivalent to 6,000 words for full-time students and a 10,000-word report for flexible students.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is undertaken by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) staff and visiting lecturers in a variety of forms including lectures, seminars, workshops, visual presentations with a substantial part of the programme involving off-site teaching in museums, galleries and heritage sites. Assessment includes 5,000-word assignments and electronic media.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Museums and Galleries in Education MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as: education officers at historical sites, digital programme managers in national art and design museums, heads of learning, heads of interpretation and curation in museums and galleries, and heads of research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Visitor Experience Associate and Exhibit Mentor, Boston Children's Museum

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Museums and Galleries in Education MA has a long and distinguished history for both those wishing to learn about the educational potential of the cultural sector and those wishing to expand their existing careers.

UCL Institute of Education is ideally situated for students to make excellent use of an extraordinary range of institutions, many within walking distance of the Art, Design and Museology studios.

Moreover the MA works in close collaboration with the Art and Design in Education MA tutors and together they have created an international research-active environment in which to share knowledge and professional expertise.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Culture, Communication & Media

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets. Read more

This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets.

As the digital aspects of content industries, the cultural heritage sector and the private sector are reaching maturity, career opportunities have mushroomed worldwide for professionals, who are familiar with digital media and have the skills to manage digital content throughout its lifecycle.

Key benefits

  • We draw on a wide range of expertise, offering insights into curatorial and archival practices of dealing with digital assets as well as into technologies and wider socioeconomic questions such as rights and project management.
  • The course tutors offer unrivalled expertise in technologies and processes that allow the quick and efficient storage, retrieval and reuse of digital assets. They come from a diverse and highly interdisciplinary background, having run digital archives or worked in the digital industries in the past.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • Close links and regular speakers from the content sector give students insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Description

Our Digital Asset & Media Management MA takes a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to explore and critically assess competing theories and practices from across new media digital management, archival, and information science. This will provide you with a well-rounded understanding of the requirements across many domains. In recent years there has been an explosion in the volume, complexity and range of digital content in a variety of media. This has been called the big data revolution and is closely connected to the increasing interest in the digital economy as an engine of growth.

There are very few institutions of any size that do not create and depend on the management, reuse and curation of digital media and information. Government, the public sector, Higher Education, cultural and creative industries and business all make and use these assets every day. This makes the skills we will give you increasingly attractive to employers. As well as developing the practical skills you need to manage digital media assets, you will also develop your critical and reflective capacities and increase your understanding of the interdependence between digital processes, technology, society and curatorial practice. This will enable you to enter into a technologically complex and fast-moving digital world of work.

Reasons you should consider the Digital Asset and Media Management:

  • Broadcast and publishing industries are increasingly using digital media in new ways, on new technological platforms such as tablets and mobile.
  • Archives and libraries are increasingly depending on digital materials and cultural heritage organisations are digitizing and making digital materials relating to our history and culture more available.
  • Businesses rely on digital media and content to develop, run and manage their future prosperity.
  • Research managers and data scientists work with large volumes of digital data, running experiments, simulations and visualisations.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing their valuable digital media assets.

Course purpose

The course will prepare students for work or research in an economy and society which increasingly recognises the value of digital media and digital assets in general. Managing these and understanding how to exploit them within a complex digital information environment presents significant challenges for organisations. As a consequence there is an increasing demand for professionals with digital asset and media management expertise. The MA responds to this demand for digitally literate professionals to work in the educational and heritage institutions as well as the publishing, broadcast, and creative content industries. The course aims to equip students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year and 50 in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year, and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will consist of a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
This course is ideal if you are interested in pursuing imaginative, interdisciplinary, international museum study. It will advance your knowledge of contemporary developments in this vibrant and sophisticated area of culture, art and heritage industries, and provide you with transferable skills essential for the sector. Read more
This course is ideal if you are interested in pursuing imaginative, interdisciplinary, international museum study. It will advance your knowledge of contemporary developments in this vibrant and sophisticated area of culture, art and heritage industries, and provide you with transferable skills essential for the sector. Our underlying philosophy is to offer you a broad and engaging vision of, and approach to, contemporary museum, gallery and heritage practice, evaluation and innovating ideas around the institution and industry.

Key features

-This course provides an interdisciplinary study of museums and galleries. It offers a range of approaches to teaching and assessment based on the concept of creative research, including creative project work and practice-based research opportunities.
-The major project allows you to develop your own interests and gain valuable research and practice-based skills.
-Possible European destinations for field visits include Paris, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, Barcelona and Amsterdam.

What will you study?

The course examines contemporary issues and practices, including collection, interpretation, exhibition, space, place and the city, audiences and communities, institutional purpose, scenario planning and sustainable futures. You will study taught modules covering critical analysis and creative practice, and conduct research around the broad themes and subjects addressed by each module. Modules have been developed in collaboration with, and are taught with museums such as the Museum of London, National Maritime Museum, V&A, and Kingston Museum and Heritage Service.

Assessment

Essays, project work, portfolio, and dissertation (12,000–15,000 words).

About this course

You will study a series of dedicated taught modules that are concerned with issues of critical theory and analysis, research methodologies and creative practice. You will be expected to conduct research around the broad themes and subjects addressed by each module. This research will allow you to tailor your own path of study according to your particular interests and future aspirations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Ideas and Institutions
-Learning and Experience
-Exhibition an Encounter
-The Challenge of Change
-Major Project

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The Courtauld Institute of Art Masters Courses
Distance from London: 0 miles
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Read more
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Its purpose is to extend and develop graduates’ art historical interests, expertise and scholarship into the area of curatorship and active engagement with collections and exhibitions in the museum and gallery realm.

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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. Read more

The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. The one-year programme is accredited by the professional association, Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), and offers students a wide range of up-to-date learning opportunities while helping to develop strong networks designed to enhance their employability.

About this degree

The programme prepares students for professional practice in the field of library and information studies. It strengthens traditional principles with cutting-edge approaches and helps students understand how information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded. It provides students with the practical skills required to identify, locate, manage and organise information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Cataloguing and Classification
  • Managing Collections
  • Supporting Information Users
  • Managing Information Organisations
  • Using Technology in Information Organisations
  • The Library and Information Professional

Optional modules

  • Students choose two of the following:
  • Academic and Journals Publishing
  • Collections Care
  • Database Systems Analysis and Design
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Governance
  • Individual Approved Study
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Web Publishing

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on active learning and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments such as website design and the creation of indexing tools.

Placement

The work placement is open to full-time (compulsory) and part-time (optional) students and forms part of G030, The Library and Information Professional module. The work placement gives students experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken at the beginning of the third term. We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Library and Information Studies MA

Careers

The programme aims to be broad-based: we are not trying to produce graduates who can work in only one kind of library or information service. The skills and competences we aim to develop are intended to apply in a wide range of different sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Librarian, National Library of Singapore
  • Library Assistant, University of Oxford
  • Intranet Content Co-ordinator, Baker Tilly
  • Library Assistant, The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple
  • News Reference Specialist, British Library

Employability

As a vocational Master's, this programme prepares students for employment in the library and information sector, and, in most cases, for promotion from their pre-library school role as a library assistant to a qualified librarian role, such as senior library assistant, assistant librarian, librarian and library manager. Students also choose careers in information provision, such as taxonomists and web designers. There are specialist employment agencies that place students in both short-term and permanent positions, so if students do not find their ideal post straight away, they usually find suitable employment while continuing to seek their ideal post.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has been the home of professional library training and education since 1919. The current programme continues to attract an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders. It combines an appreciation of the traditional library with the latest developments in internet and digital technologies to develop an understanding of the ever-evolving information environment.

Networking opportunities include a two-week work placement, regular journal club and speaker events, guest lectures by professionals and career seminars led by industry professionals. Additionally, in terms of expanding its international connections, the programme has been granted precandidacy status by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Library Association (ALA). Precandidacy status is an indication that the programme has voluntarily committed to participate in the ALA accreditation process and is actively seeking accreditation.

Students benefit from UCL's proximity to major libraries and repositories, including the British Library, UCL Special Collections and the Senate House Library of the University of London. 

Accreditation

The Library and Information Studies MA/PG Diploma has been accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) as professional level qualifications for a period of five years from the 2014 student cohort intake.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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