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Masters Degrees in Information Management, London, United Kingdom

We have 10 Masters Degrees in Information Management, London, United Kingdom

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Who is it for?. This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to start or develop a career working with digital technologies and media to manage information resources, systems and services. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to start or develop a career working with digital technologies and media to manage information resources, systems and services. The course is also ideal for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the information sector.

Information Science is a broad, interdisciplinary field, which is relevant and applicable to all disciplines. Information Scientists may work in any organisation that collects and processes information of any kind. Whilst it has its origins in the handling of the scientific and technical literature, today the subject appeals to those who enjoy working with information resources of all kinds, and who have an aptitude for the technological systems and processes related to information storage, preservation, discovery and access.

Accreditation

City's Information Science course is approved by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). CILIP accredited courses are recognised by the American Library Association (ALA) and The Australian Library and Information Association, which means that our graduates are qualified to apply for posts requiring professional level qualifications in these countries.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use are designed to allow your specialist knowledge and autonomy to develop as you progress through the course.

Teaching at CityLIS takes place on Mondays and Fridays, during each of the two, 10 week teaching terms. Full-time students attend on both days. Part-time students attend on Mondays in year one, and Fridays in year two. Classes may be scheduled anytime between 09.00 and 18.00, although we usually try to work between 10.00 and 17.00.

Taught modules are usually delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures. Lectures are normally used to:

  • present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject
  • highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus
  • indicate additional topics and resources for private study

City's online learning environment, Moodle, contains resources to support face-to-face lectures, including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

In addition to lectures, you will have the opportunity to attend course-related workshops and seminars. You also will have access to a personal tutor, an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This will amount to approximately 120 hours of study per module, in addition to class attendance. Each of the modules run by CityLIS is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations. Elective modules may be assessed by examination.

On successful completion of the course's eight taught modules, you will undertake your dissertation. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The dissertation allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results, solutions and recommendations on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is where you can apply what you have learnt to a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in information science.

Communication and networking are an integral part of our Information Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you will be expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communications media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You will be encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

Modules

The MSc in Information Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. While we aim to run all of our advertised electives, we reserve the right to cancel an elective should this be necessary. For example, if very few students choose it. Some electives are offered by other departments, who may need to restrict access to very popular electives (though this has not happened in recent years). Please note that as some electives run on different days, students who can only attend on one day per week may be restricted in their choice of elective module.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be as lectures, seminars, group work, discussion, practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of 8 taught modules, you can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

The MSc in Information Science covers:

  • history of information science
  • social-cultural impact of information science
  • information organisation
  • metadata
  • data visualisation
  • information resources
  • information law and ethics
  • information retrieval
  • information technologies
  • information management
  • information literacy
  • research methods
  • information services


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University College London UCL Qatar
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Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. Read more

Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. This ground-breaking MA aims to nurture a world-class cadre of library professionals and train the future leaders of the sector.

About this degree

The programme provides students with an awareness of current issues and trends in library and information work. It fosters understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded, and equips students with practical skills for the identification, location, management and organisation of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is also offered. Students complete all modules except the dissertation.

Core modules

  • Knowledge Organisation and Access
  • Collection Management
  • Research Methods in Information and Library Science
  • Reference and Information Services
  • Introduction to Management
  • Professional Awareness
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Students choose two modules from the following:

  • The Book in the World
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Information Literacy
  • Interdisciplinary Methods for the Study of Cultural Heritage
  • Introduction to Archives and Preservation
  • Islamic Manuscripts
  • Library Systems and Data Management
  • Services to Children and Young People

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, private reading, seminars, practical classes, small group work, group project work, computer laboratory sessions, essay writing, and independent research. Except for short courses, all programmes are delivered in afternoon sessions. Students can access and use the virtual learning environment (Moodle) at UCL, which provides the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of UCL staff both in London and Qatar. Intensive short courses will also be delivered by visiting staff from UCL Information Studies (London). Assessment takes a variety of forms including: essays, portfolios, prepared practical work, individual and group project work, report writing, policy writing, presentations, peer assessment and the dissertation. There is also a written examination, attached to the professional awareness module, and accounting for 50% of the marks.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Library and Information Studies (UCL Qatar) MA

Careers

Graduates will be equipped to work in a wide network of settings including school libraries, libraries based in government ministries, and many more libraries in institutions such as museums and societies, and countless business libraries and archives.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar has become the first degree programme of its kind in the region to be formally accredited by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The MA in Library and Information Studies is identical to the programme offered by UCL Information Studies in London – the UK’s largest facility for the teaching of library and information studies.

Students have the opportunity to network with leading library professionals from Qatar and the region and will undertake a placement in a local or international library.

Qatar is investing heavily in libraries, infrastructure and capacity building. This is an exceptionally exciting period for students and professionals who are looking to develop their career in the region.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. Read more

Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. This, in part, is due to increasing competition and a business imperative which recognises that in order to achieve competitive advantage, efficiency and success of each and every project is important.

This exciting new Masters in Applied Project Management contextualises the practice of project management within specific sectors and provides the graduate with the generic skills and competences required to fulfil their business and organisational needs.

The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from Principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

Course detail

This full-time version is with Internship of 6 months duration, with dissertation development. This allows completion within 18 months. To support Internship two non-assessed modules of Personal & Professional Development and Employability Skills & Employment are incorporated within the course and allocated tutor for internship.

The Internship Course seeks to provide the same rigorous and challenging programme of professional practice as the MSc Applied Project Management but has the added advantage of including a 6 months internship incorporated into the period of study. This makes it ideal for students seeking to add a practical dimension to their studies and understand the demands of workplace supervision and management. Internship opportunities exist throughout the industry within the UK.

The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

Pathways

You can choose from one of the following pathways:

  • Computing Pathway
  • Consultancy and Technical Innovation.

OR

  • Enterprise Management Pathway
  • Management of Organisational Change.

Format

A variety of teaching methods will be used within course module deliveries especially to capture the applied aspects of project management. In fact the core modules were constructed with teaching variety methods from the outset. The pathways modules need to capture sector expectations and final dissertation offers a wideness of choice.

Assessment

The assessment offers a balance of assessment approaches of assignment only and some will have a mixture with an examination as an end assessment.

For example: The module Strategic Innovation Management initial assignment involves group work and requires a presentation creation and delivery. The final assignment is an individually developed document requiring you to conduct research on the use of projects in an organisation. There is no examination for the modules and assessment weighting 40/60.

There are only a total of 5 modules that require examinations as part of their end assessment for the course with maximum of only 4 examinations required for selected pathways.

Career and study progression

Project management plays an important role in nearly all organisation, from SMEs through to the largest global corporations. Knowledge and skills gained within this course will enable graduates to take on the role of project manager and/or become an effective member of a project management team.

Graduates are encouraged to further their study at the level of MPhil and PhD. We actively encourage students interested in research to make their interest known early on in their course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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The Information Security MSc offers a specialist programme designed to provide a fundamental understanding of information security and to convey practical engineering skills. Read more

The Information Security MSc offers a specialist programme designed to provide a fundamental understanding of information security and to convey practical engineering skills. There are good prospects for highly trained information security professionals and there is a shortage of trained personnel in this area.

About this degree

Students develop an advanced knowledge of information security and an awareness of the context in which information security operates in terms of safety, environmental, social and economic aspects. They gain a wide range of intellectual, practical and transferable skills, enabling them to develop a flexible professional career in IT.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Computer Security I (15 credits)
  • Computer Security II (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Cryptography (15 credits)
  • Research in Information Security (15 credits)

Optional modules

Students choose 60 credits from the following:

  • Applied Cryptography (15 credits)
  • Cryptanalysis (15 credits)
  • Cybercrime (15 credits)
  • Distributed Systems and Security (15 credits)
  • Information Security Management (15 credits)
  • Language Based Security (15 credits)
  • Malware (15 credits)
  • People and Security (15 credits)
  • Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Security and Privacy (15 credits)
  • Privacy Enhancing Technologies (15 credits)

Please note: the availability and delivery of optional modules may vary, depending on your selection.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation (maximum length of 120 pages) and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, problem classes, tutorials, laboratory classes and projects. Assessment is through written examinations, presentations, vivas, tests, coursework, written reports, formal presentations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Information Security MSc

Careers

UCL graduates are keenly sought after by the world's leading organisations. UCL Computer Science graduates are particularly valued as a result of the department's strong international reputation, strong links with industry, and ideal location close to the City of London. Our graduates secure careers in a wide variety of organisations, e.g. with global IT consultancies, as IT analysts with City banks, or as IT specialists within manufacturing industries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Information Security Expert, State Oil Company of Azerbaijan Republic
  • IT Risk and Cyber Security Associate, PwC
  • PhD Research Student in Computer Science, UCL
  • Security Engineer, Morgan Stanley
  • Technical Analyst, The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)

Employability

Some of the brightest alumni of the degree go on to careers in academia. The majority of our students take jobs in the software and consultancy industries, usually in a security-related role such as security standards compliance, secure software design or security consultancy. Students have the opportunity to do industrially based projects with companies such as BT and McAfee. The department is recognised as an academic centre of excellence on cyber security and further opportunities to expand both academic and industrial contacts arise through the ACE-CS guest lecture series integrated into the degree.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Computer Science is recognised as a world leader in teaching and research.

UCL received the highest percentage (96%) for quality of research in Computer Science and Informatics in the UK's most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014).

This MSc is taught by academics who conduct world-leading research, most notably in cryptography and human-centred approaches to security, privacy and trust. Access to industry-led projects and guest lecturers from academia and industry will enhance post-graduation opportunities for careers in security-related research, or employment in cyber security roles. 

UCL's central London location enables students to enjoy the full benefits of life in a vibrant world city with easy access to excellent scientific and cultural centres.

Accreditation

Information Security has been successfully awarded full certification from the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). Students who wish to gain the certification with their degree need to choose COMPGA14 Information Security Management as one of their optional modules.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Computer Science

96% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets. Read more

This course looks at the creation, management, curation and repurposing of digital media and digital assets.

As the digital aspects of content industries, the cultural heritage sector and the private sector are reaching maturity, career opportunities have mushroomed worldwide for professionals, who are familiar with digital media and have the skills to manage digital content throughout its lifecycle.

Key benefits

  • We draw on a wide range of expertise, offering insights into curatorial and archival practices of dealing with digital assets as well as into technologies and wider socioeconomic questions such as rights and project management.
  • The course tutors offer unrivalled expertise in technologies and processes that allow the quick and efficient storage, retrieval and reuse of digital assets. They come from a diverse and highly interdisciplinary background, having run digital archives or worked in the digital industries in the past.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • Close links and regular speakers from the content sector give students insights and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.

Description

Our Digital Asset & Media Management MA takes a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, allowing you to explore and critically assess competing theories and practices from across new media digital management, archival, and information science. This will provide you with a well-rounded understanding of the requirements across many domains. In recent years there has been an explosion in the volume, complexity and range of digital content in a variety of media. This has been called the big data revolution and is closely connected to the increasing interest in the digital economy as an engine of growth.

There are very few institutions of any size that do not create and depend on the management, reuse and curation of digital media and information. Government, the public sector, Higher Education, cultural and creative industries and business all make and use these assets every day. This makes the skills we will give you increasingly attractive to employers. As well as developing the practical skills you need to manage digital media assets, you will also develop your critical and reflective capacities and increase your understanding of the interdependence between digital processes, technology, society and curatorial practice. This will enable you to enter into a technologically complex and fast-moving digital world of work.

Reasons you should consider the Digital Asset and Media Management:

  • Broadcast and publishing industries are increasingly using digital media in new ways, on new technological platforms such as tablets and mobile.
  • Archives and libraries are increasingly depending on digital materials and cultural heritage organisations are digitizing and making digital materials relating to our history and culture more available.
  • Businesses rely on digital media and content to develop, run and manage their future prosperity.
  • Research managers and data scientists work with large volumes of digital data, running experiments, simulations and visualisations.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing their valuable digital media assets.

Course purpose

The course will prepare students for work or research in an economy and society which increasingly recognises the value of digital media and digital assets in general. Managing these and understanding how to exploit them within a complex digital information environment presents significant challenges for organisations. As a consequence there is an increasing demand for professionals with digital asset and media management expertise. The MA responds to this demand for digitally literate professionals to work in the educational and heritage institutions as well as the publishing, broadcast, and creative content industries. The course aims to equip students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1,674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year and 50 in your second year. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year, and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will consist of a mixture of essays, project work, and workshop reports, depending on the modules you choose.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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A two-year international course providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training, equipping you to manage and curate the digital information and digital assets of organisations across public and private sectors. Read more

A two-year international course providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training, equipping you to manage and curate the digital information and digital assets of organisations across public and private sectors. Students study for one year at King’s and one year at Humboldt University Berlin, and choose from an exceptional range of options covering different aspects of digital curation.

Reasons you should consider the MA in Digital Curation are:

  • You will receive an outstanding education that will equip you to become a leader in the field of digital curation and information management.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing and curating their valuable digital information and assets.
  • You will study in two of Europe’s most exciting cities and have the opportunity to engage with cultural and creative sectors in both cities.

Key benefits

  • This unique course offers students an unparalleled opportunity to study at two world leading institutions: Humboldt University is the only higher education institution in Germany to teach information science, while King's College London is a leading institution for learning about the intellectual and technical exploitation of digital resources. Students will gain a rich and varied educational, social and cultural experience and a joint qualification from King’s and Humboldt.
  • Students will study in two of Europe’s most vibrant cities spending a year in Berlin followed by a year in London. These unrivalled locations allow students to experience a variety of different cultures, and access to some of the greatest cultural heritage and arts institutions in the world. Both King’s and Humboldt have close links with a range of cultural heritage and memory institutions in London and Berlin respectively and are able to offer internship opportunities and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.
  • The tutors offer cutting edge expertise in library, archive and information science, with specialist knowledge in digital technologies and processes. They come from diverse and highly interdisciplinary backgrounds, including running digital archives or working in the digital industries.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in a range of organisations, including libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

Description

This King’s-Humboldt joint MA in Digital Curation is a two-year course involving one academic year of study at each institution. It offers you access to the combined talents of two world-class departments.

Digital content and digital technologies are a defining feature of our age. Digital data, information and knowledge are an asset for cultural heritage, memory institutions, industry, commerce and government. They are fundamental for research and practice in fields such as the law and medicine. As individuals we increasingly communicate and record our lives and our memories in digital form. But digital information is fragile and complex and requires ongoing and active curation as we seek to ensure its longevity and innovate in its use, and exploit its social, cultural and commercial value.

This course will give you the core skills, knowledge and competencies you need to become a leader in the rapidly expanding field of digital curation. You will study a wide range of subjects including metadata, preservation, knowledge representation, digital libraries, ethics and rights management, and new digital technologies and methods, including cloud and crowd-sourcing technologies. You will also have an opportunity to undertake an internship to gain workplace experience. We want you to acquire a great deal of practical knowledge, but even more we want you to develop your critical and reflective capacities, and to acquire an understanding of the inter-dependence of developments in digital processes, technology and curatorial practice. This MA will also provide an excellent grounding if you are interested in going on to a PhD in Digital Curation or a related area.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Curation is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in organisations and enterprises with significant volumes of digital information and knowledge. The course responds to the increasing demand for digitally literate professionals to work in education and heritage institutions, as well as wider industry by equipping students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in the curation of digital information and assets.

Further literature

Take a look at Humboldt info here

Find out more info about preparing for your stay in Germany

Info about what you need to submit to enrol at Humboldt

Course format and assessment

Teaching

In your first year, Humboldt University will provide 300 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and they will expect you to undertake 1,200 hours of independent study.

In your second year we will provide you with 110 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 984 hours of independent study.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and exams.

Extra information

Students spend four semesters over the course of two years on the programme: two consecutive semesters at Humboldt and two semesters at King's, beginning the programme at Humboldt in all cases. 

All teaching will be in English.

More information about the Digital Curation programme at Humboldt.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Who is it for?. This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to work in a library, or similar collection-orientated organisation. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who would like to work in a library, or similar collection-orientated organisation. It is also suitable for anyone wishing to update their knowledge and skills, in order to progress a career based around collections and services within galleries, libraries, museums and archives.

Library Science is a broad, interdisciplinary subject, the principles and practice of which underpin today’s information society. It appeals to students with an eye for detail, an interest in the organisation, technologies, and communication of information, and in understanding the organisational and wider social impacts of information policy, access and provision.

Accreditation

City’s Library Science course is approved by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). CILIP accredited courses are recognised by the American Library Association (ALA) and The Australian Library and Information Association, which means that our graduates are qualified to apply for posts requiring professional level qualifications in the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use are designed to allow your specialist knowledge and autonomy to develop as you progress through the course.

Teaching at CityLIS takes place on Mondays and Fridays, during each of the two, 10 week teaching terms. Full-time students attend on both days. Part-time students attend on Mondays in year one, and Fridays in year two. Classes may be scheduled anytime between 09.00 and 18.00, although we usually try to work between 10.00 and 17.00.

Taught modules are usually delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures. Lectures are normally used to:

  • present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject
  • highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus
  • indicate additional topics and resources for private study

City’s online learning environment, Moodle, contains resources to support face-to-face lectures, including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

In addition to lectures, you will have the opportunity to attend course-related workshops and seminars. You also will have access to a personal tutor, an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This will amount to approximately 120 hours of study per module, in addition to class attendance. Each of the modules run by CityLIS is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations. Elective modules may be assessed by examination.

On successful completion of the course’s eight taught modules, you will undertake your dissertation. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The dissertation allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results, solutions and recommendations on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is where you can apply what you have learnt to a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Communication and networking are an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you will be expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communications media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You will be encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. While we aim to run all of our advertised electives, we reserve the right to cancel an elective should this be necessary. For example, if very few students choose it. Some electives are offered by other departments, who may need to restrict access to very popular electives (though this has not happened in recent years). Please note that as some electives run on different days, students who can only attend on one day per week may be restricted in their choice of elective module.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The MA/MSc in Library Science covers:

  • library history
  • social-cultural impact of libraries and library services
  • information resources
  • collection management
  • cataloguing and classification
  • metadata
  • information law and ethics
  • digital libraries
  • information technologies
  • information literacy
  • libraries and publishing
  • research methods


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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Course Overview. This masters degree course in Cyber Security is being offered by the School of Computing and Engineering and has been developed in response to a high demand for cyber security professionals with systematic understanding of the principles and technologies underpinning today's IT systems. Read more

Course Overview

This masters degree course in Cyber Security is being offered by the School of Computing and Engineering and has been developed in response to a high demand for cyber security professionals with systematic understanding of the principles and technologies underpinning today's IT systems.

The School of Computing and Engineering has partnered with leaders within the security industry to provide you with a course which will enable you to gain comprehensive knowledge and critical skills in computer security. This course will enable you to pursue a career as a cyber security professional in either the public or the private sector.

Why choose this course?

This course is offered with a 6 months internship. The internship on the course will allow you to gain first hand work experience within the industry, it will enable you to improve and acquire new skills. Throughout the internship you will be encourages to explore various career opportunities, network and work with others as part of a team. It will also enhance your understanding of the world and what constitutes professional practice in the workplace.

In today’s digital world cyber security plays an integral role, people trained in this field are greatly sought after and the course is designed to meet the huge market demand for cyber security professionals. Partnering with leading security industry, this course combines theory and practice, balancing cutting-edge security technologies and solutions with concepts and principles of cyber security.

The course aims to develop your ability to analyse the legal, social, ethical and professional issues involved in the human aspects of cyber security and be guided by the adoption of appropriate professional, ethical and legal practices. 

The course aims to develop your critical skills and techniques to appropriately solve typical cyber security problems, enabling you to choose from a range of security related jobs/roles in a rapidly evolving and diverse environment.

This course provides routes into a diverse range of career opportunities in the information and communications technology (ICT) industry and in organisations that are data and knowledge intensive. Employers require information security officers at all levels including:

  • Chief Information Security Officer
  • Network and Computer Security Engineers
  • Security Managers and Consultants
  • Penetration Testers
  • Cybersecurity Analysts
  • Security Investigators
  • Security Researchers.

You will have access to laboratories and dedicated ICT suites with specialist networks and software as well as excellent resources for study space and meetings.

Modules

  • Fundamentals of Cyber Security
  • Security Management
  • Network and Systems Security
  • Research Methods
  • Learning and Professional Development 
  • Employability Skills and Employment
  • Dissertation

Optional Modules:

  • Distributed Application Development 
  • Mobile Web Component Development 
  • Principles of Project Management 
  • Consultancy and Technical Innovation 
  • Security Operations and Assurance 
  • Data Architecture
  • Knowledge Management

Career and study progression

The security industry includes government and law enforcement as well as providers of equipment and services, such as the:

  • anti-virus, security software vendors (such as McAfee, Kaspersky, Symantec, Sophos)
  • network and computer vendors (such as Cisco, Juniper, Palo Alto, HP, Barracuda)
  • network and service providers (such as British Telecom, Vodafone, Rackspace, Amazon)
  • consultancies (such as KPMG, IBM, Fujitsu, HP)

The School of Computing and Engineering also has a growing research and enterprise culture with thirty PhD students as well as a diversity of research groups.

Outstanding graduates can continue their studies at the level of MPhil and PhD at UWL.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. Read more

The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. The one-year programme is accredited by the professional association, Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), and offers students a wide range of up-to-date learning opportunities while helping to develop strong networks designed to enhance their employability.

About this degree

The programme prepares students for professional practice in the field of library and information studies. It strengthens traditional principles with cutting-edge approaches and helps students understand how information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded. It provides students with the practical skills required to identify, locate, manage and organise information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Cataloguing and Classification
  • Managing Collections
  • Supporting Information Users
  • Managing Information Organisations
  • Using Technology in Information Organisations
  • The Library and Information Professional

Optional modules

  • Students choose two of the following:
  • Academic and Journals Publishing
  • Collections Care
  • Database Systems Analysis and Design
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Information Literacy
  • Information Governance
  • Individual Approved Study
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Web Publishing

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on active learning and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments such as website design and the creation of indexing tools.

Placement

The work placement is open to full-time (compulsory) and part-time (optional) students and forms part of G030, The Library and Information Professional module. The work placement gives students experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken at the beginning of the third term. We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Library and Information Studies MA

Careers

The programme aims to be broad-based: we are not trying to produce graduates who can work in only one kind of library or information service. The skills and competences we aim to develop are intended to apply in a wide range of different sectors.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Librarian, National Library of Singapore
  • Library Assistant, University of Oxford
  • Intranet Content Co-ordinator, Baker Tilly
  • Library Assistant, The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple
  • News Reference Specialist, British Library

Employability

As a vocational Master's, this programme prepares students for employment in the library and information sector, and, in most cases, for promotion from their pre-library school role as a library assistant to a qualified librarian role, such as senior library assistant, assistant librarian, librarian and library manager. Students also choose careers in information provision, such as taxonomists and web designers. There are specialist employment agencies that place students in both short-term and permanent positions, so if students do not find their ideal post straight away, they usually find suitable employment while continuing to seek their ideal post.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has been the home of professional library training and education since 1919. The current programme continues to attract an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders. It combines an appreciation of the traditional library with the latest developments in internet and digital technologies to develop an understanding of the ever-evolving information environment.

Networking opportunities include a two-week work placement, regular journal club and speaker events, guest lectures by professionals and career seminars led by industry professionals. Additionally, in terms of expanding its international connections, the programme has been granted precandidacy status by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Library Association (ALA). Precandidacy status is an indication that the programme has voluntarily committed to participate in the ALA accreditation process and is actively seeking accreditation.

Students benefit from UCL's proximity to major libraries and repositories, including the British Library, UCL Special Collections and the Senate House Library of the University of London. 

Accreditation

The Library and Information Studies MA/PG Diploma has been accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) as professional level qualifications for a period of five years from the 2014 student cohort intake.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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