• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Nottingham in China Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
London×
0 miles
History & Archaeology×

Masters Degrees in Heritage Studies, London, United Kingdom

We have 15 Masters Degrees in Heritage Studies, London, United Kingdom

  • History & Archaeology×
  • Heritage Studies×
  • United Kingdom
  • London×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 15
Order by 
The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

Read less
University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

Degree information

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following core modules:
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules - students then choose to follow futher option choices to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choices offered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
-Cultural Memory
-Funerary Archaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement
Students have the option to do a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, The National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed.

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Adult Learning officer, Museum of London
-Garden of Reason Assistant, Ham House and Garden
-Museum Curator, Haysrim Museum
-Researcher, Museo Nacional de Colombia (Colombian National Museum)
-Art and Finance, Sotheby's Institute of Arts, London

Employability
Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

Read less
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
-Debating Africa's Future
-Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules - students choose three from a range of options including the following:
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

Read less
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

Read less
This innovative cross-disciplinary programme teaches 'hard' science subjects within a cultural heritage context. You will develop a holistic understanding of state-of-the-art science and engineering enabling you to identify, investigate and solve problems in arts, heritage and archaeology. Read more
This innovative cross-disciplinary programme teaches 'hard' science subjects within a cultural heritage context. You will develop a holistic understanding of state-of-the-art science and engineering enabling you to identify, investigate and solve problems in arts, heritage and archaeology. Students gain a range of competitive skills that make them employable in industry, heritage or academia.

Degree information

SEAHA students develop a unique, interdisciplinary understanding of art, heritage, and archaeological sites within their historical, artistic, and cultural contexts. You will question and reflect on research in the light of broader societal and environmental issues. You will gain the skills to engage with diverse stakeholders including researchers, heritage professionals, policymakers and the wider public.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-SEAHA in Context
-Transferrable Skills
-Research Methodology
-Field Project

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which usually includes placement in a heritage institution. The project culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, problem-solving classes, tutorials, laboratory and fieldwork and independent project work. It includes a significant research component with intensively linked projects, field-based research and a dissertation. Students present their research through a poster, a scientific paper, and a fieldwork report.

Careers

Graduates have pursued careers in a wide variety of fields including further PhD studies and academia, museum science, galleries and museums, and preservation and conservation.

Employability
SEAHA graduates have enhanced knowledge of conservation, interpretation, research and management within cultural heritage. You will be ideally placed to take on employment in cross-disciplinary roles within industry, heritage institutions or academia. Alternatively, you may wish to follow this programme with a PhD in diverse range of science or engineering subjects.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme provides students with access to interdisciplinary teachers, including world-leading heritage professionals, as well as a cutting-edge heritage science laboratory equipped with instrumentation and tools for environmental, digital and materials research. Students engage in real-life case studies enabling discussion and reflection on complex heritage issues. By working with leading, heritage stakeholders and fellow students, you will be at the forefront of scientific research in cultural heritage.

As part of the MRes, students benefit from a fully funded field laboratory experience involving the SEAHA Mobile Heritage Laboratory, enabling them to develop their research ideas in the field, and to interact with heritage owners, managers and visitors.

Read less
Heritage Studies at the University of East London offers a flexible programme for students interested in engaging with advanced study at different points in their academic or professional careers, at a modern London university which is an internationally recognised centre of research excellence. Read more
Heritage Studies at the University of East London offers a flexible programme for students interested in engaging with advanced study at different points in their academic or professional careers, at a modern London university which is an internationally recognised centre of research excellence. The programme focuses on heritage in London and the interpretation of urban place. It provides students with an in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of oral history and memory. It includes numerous opportunities to develop skills in digital media production, and the opportunity to explore heritage issues in East London - one of the most diverse communities in the world, in a city with outstanding museum collections and heritage sites.

The MA is conducted within the vibrant research culture of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). The School is internationally renowned and was awarded a ‘5’ rating in both the 1996 and 2001 HEFCE Research Assessment Exercises and an ‘excellent’ in its last Teaching Quality Audit. In RAE 2008 the School of Humanities and Social Sciences confirmed its status as one of the UK's leading university departments for research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies, with 20% of research in this area judged to be 'world-leading' and a further 60% internationally excellent, and a position of 7th from 47 in the national rankings. Outputs in historical studies were also ranked as world-leading. This is an exceptional profile in the modern university sector. Staff research is characterised by a commitment to interdisciplinary inquiry and draws on insights from across the arts, humanities, computing and social sciences. The School is home to a number of research centres, including the Raphael Samuel History Centre (http://www.raphael-samuel.org.uk), and organises regular public seminars, lectures and international workshops and conferences at which postgraduate students are welcome.


UEL has one of the most diverse student bodies in the country. We strongly believe in an equality and diversity policy which states: “Within a spirit of respecting difference, our equality and diversity policies promise equal treatment and opportunity for all regardless of gender, sexuality, race, colour, disability, religion, age, and ethnic or national origin. We call on all members of our community to make a personal commitment to these aims."

Read less
University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia. Read more
This MA is unique in the UK in providing such a comprehensive overview of Asian archaeology and cultural heritage. The Institute of Archaeology is one of the few places in the world with the expertise to deliver such a programme, encompassing not only India and China, but also South–East and Central Asia.

Degree information

The aim of this programme is to develop a comparative appreciation of the cultural histories and heritage of Asia, moving chronologically from early human history, through movements towards the Neolithic, and the rise of cities and states, to the present day by looking at current debates around conservation ethics, reconstruction and authenticity of archaeological remains.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Archaeological Heritage Management in Asia

Optional modules - students take three further optional modules to the value of 45 credits. These can be selected from the outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, but for this degree, the normal choices include:
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeology of Buddhism
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Memory
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Public Archaeology
-Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays, PowerPoint presentations, supervised independent research project and dissertation, and an oral viva towards the end of the degree.

Careers

Graduates of this new programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Employability
The experience and skills acquired depends on the optional modules selected, and how those skills are developed through assessed work, practical elements and dissertation, but in general we expect students to develop expertise in the archaeology of specific regions of Asia (in particular East Asia, South Asia, Central Asia and to some extent South–East Asia) and a broader comparative, international perspective on that region of Asia. Students gain knowledge of both current scholarly debates in archaeology as well as heritage management issues. We expect students from this programme to be prepared for job in the archaeological services or heritage organizations on Asian countries or to be well-prepared for doctoral studies focused on one or more parts of Asia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is unique in training pan-Asian specialists – escaping traditional study area boundaries where China, India, South–East and Central Asia are studied on their own – and conducting inter-regional dialogue on the human past.

Students are given the opportunity to develop depth of expertise in a particular region in Asia while benefiting from an innovative macro-regional comparative perspective.

This MA focuses on the development of human societies and civilisations in a part of the world which is becoming increasingly influential in world affairs but has been under-represented in most general and regional archaeological programmes.

Read less
University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

Read less
The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. Read more
The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. This programme also enables international collaborations to take place across the academic and professional field of museum studies.

Degree information

The programme enables students to carry out a practical and theoretical study on education in museums and galleries. University-based sessions are supplemented by teaching sessions at national, regional and university collections. Additionally students gain flexible access to historic and contemporary sites and full-time students have a 20-day research-based placement in a museum, gallery or heritage site.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation and portfolio (60 credits).

Core modules
-Issues in Museum Studies
-Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice

Optional modules
-Alternative Models for Art Education
-Constructing and Interpreting Heritage Culture
-Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
-Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 14,000 words with a portfolio equivalent to 6,000 words for full-time students and a 10,000-word report for flexible students.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is undertaken by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) staff and visiting lecturers in a variety of forms including lectures, seminars, workshops, visual presentations with a substantial part of the programme involving off-site teaching in museums, galleries and heritage sites. Assessment includes 5,000-word assignments and electronic media.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as: education officers at historical sites, digital programme managers in national art and design museums, heads of learning, heads of interpretation and curation in museums and galleries, and heads of research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Learning Manager (Audience Development), Design Museum
-Programme Manager, Dulwich Picture Gallery
-Heritage Intern, South Somerset District Council
-Science Educator, Natural History Museum

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Museums and Galleries in Education MA has a long and distinguished history for both those wishing to learn about the educational potential of the cultural sector and those wishing to expand their existing careers.

UCL Institute of Education is ideally situated for students to make excellent use of an extraordinary range of institutions, many within walking distance of the Art, Design and Museology studios.

Moreover the MA works in close collaboration with the Art and Design in Education MA tutors and together they have created an international research-active environment in which to share knowledge and professional expertise.

Read less
This MA is a specialised qualification for those wishing to pursue a career in history working in broadcasting or in film, in museums, heritage or in journalism. Read more
This MA is a specialised qualification for those wishing to pursue a career in history working in broadcasting or in film, in museums, heritage or in journalism.

You will be equipped with professional skills of historical interpretation and communication and provided with an opportunity to work alongside practitioners in the field, including museum curators, public archivists, publishers and TV and radio producers. We welcome a variety of guest lecturers and collaborate with a number of external partner institutions such as the National Trust, London Metropolitan Archives and ancestry.co.uk.

This is a unique gateway to the heritage sector and to the popular media, a new MA for historians keen to engage in the modern world.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mapublichistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will have the opportunity to network with producers and representatives from production companies and develop links within the industry.

- You will be entitled to become members of the Institute of Historical Research, an excellent research library, which is housed in Senate House of the University of London. Every evening, many seminars meet at the Institute; here internationally known historians, postgraduate students, visiting historians or local scholars give papers and discussion follows.

- Our unique course units are taught by industry professionals who are well connected and up-to-date with the latest techniques.

- This is a unique gateway which provides students with the knowledge and skill base from which they can proceed to careers in the knowledge economy, the creative industries and the heritage industry.

- Provision is made for students pursuing continuing professional development programmes and part-time study.

Department research and industry highlights

Noted for depth, breadth and innovation, the research output of Royal Holloway historians ranges from ancient to contemporary times, from Britain and Europe to America, the Middle and Far East and Australia, and from political history to economic, social, cultural, intellectual, medical, environmental, and gender history. In particular, the History Department has special strengths in social, cultural, and gender history, and in the history of ideas - with research that covers a notable range of countries, periods, and approaches.

We have a number of research centres:
- Bedford Centre for the History of Women
- 1970s Network
- Research Centre for the Holocaust and Twentieth-Century History
- Hellenic Institute
- Centre for the Study of the Domestic Interior.

Course content and structure

You will study five core units and produce a Project Dissertation.

Core course units:
Studying and Communicating the Past
You will be introduced to the range of skills and resources you need to understand and deploy as a historian. The unit includes guest talks by specialists and practitioners.

History Past and Present: Definitions, Concepts and Approaches
This is a wide-ranging methodology unit that explores the development of history as a discipline and considers the question ‘who and what is history for?’

The Public Communication and Understanding of History
This is an introduction to writing for popular media (journalism, TV and radio). The unit will include outside lecturers and a visit to a BBC/independent production company to meet working producers.

Pathways to the Past
This unit has been developed in collaboration with a number of external partner institutions and considers public history in the contemporary world through popular history books, films, exhibitions and national and local memorials

The Voice of the Public: Oral History in Public History
You will be introduced to the theory and practice of oral history and develops the skills necessary to conduct and record an audio oral history interview to current broadcast and archive standards.

The Public History Project Dissertation
This gives you the opportunity to either research a specific issue or engage with a specific partner institution to produce an exhibition, piece of oral history, a publishable article or radio programme.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a systematic understanding and knowledge of issues of knowledge transfer and public engagement

- critical awareness of current issues related to public history, heritage and citizenship

- theoretical insights and methodological techniques relevant to the development and interpretation of historical knowledge in the public presentation of the past and to the evaluation of current research and scholarship in the field

- tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of the representation of the past.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

This course fully prepares graduates for careers in heritage, media, journalism and education. Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including working for an MP, as a Heritage Officer, teaching and marketing. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

Read less
Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Read more
Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Taught modules from which you can choose are built around our research expertise in 20th-century and contemporary Britain, modern international and imperial history, and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period. The course is also tailored to your interests and needs, with full- and part-time routes, and a dissertation on your own research interest.

Key features
-Taught modules built around our research expertise in 20th-century Britain, modern international and imperial history and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period.
-Benefit from London's vast range of historical centres, museums and resources, including the National Archives at nearby Kew and the British Library, and from access to cultural and policy-making figures working in the capital.
-Be taught in our friendly and supportive environment, in small groups, and with one to one supervision for your dissertation on a research project of your choice. Enjoy flexibility, with our full- and part-time routes.
-Engage with our programme of eminent visiting speakers, who give talks on their latest historical research
-Training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. Also, contribute to our department's highly active history blog.

What will you study?

You will take a core module, Doing History, which ranges across historical debates, archives and digital resources. It will expose you to the latest debates within the historical profession, while also providing training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. This will help equip you for your dissertation, on your chosen research topic, on which you will work one-to-one with an assigned specialist supervisor. Module assignments can be tailored to fit your research interests. You will also choose two option modules from the following three: Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture; International History; and The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society.

We offer a wide range of events and social activities, through our student History Society, a guest speaker programme, and departmental blog: http://historyatkingston.wordpress.com/.

Assessment

Essays, written assignments, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Doing History: Theory Methods and Practice
-Dissertation

Option modules (choose two)
-Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture
-International History
-The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society

Read less
The MRes programme in Curatorial/Knowledge takes place within the world’s only dedicated PhD programme for advanced contemporary curatorial research. Read more
The MRes programme in Curatorial/Knowledge takes place within the world’s only dedicated PhD programme for advanced contemporary curatorial research. It provides a profound grounding in a variety of relevant theoretical knowledges and offers a unique meeting ground for a network of internationally active curators- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-curatorial-knowledge/

The MRes programme in Curatorial/Knowledge is a unique degree recognising that in order to function as a curator in contemporary globalised culture, one needs a far-reaching educational base, a range of diverse cultural references, and the ability to ask new questions.

The world of art today spans not only cultures across the globe but also activities that include social organising, publishing and disseminating, working with local communities, and linking to institutions of education and governance. How can we equip people for such diverse tasks? This is the question that Curatorial/Knowledge has posed to the rest of the contemporary art world.

Our specific area of inquiry is ‘the curatorial’ as differentiated from ‘curating’. While ‘curating’ as such deals with the mechanisms of staging exhibitions and their discursive sphere in or out of the remit established by the museum or exhibition space, ‘the curatorial’ explores all that takes place within the context of the staged exhibition, both intentionally and unintentionally, by curator or viewers.

The MRes programme is linked to the MPhil/PhD prgramme in Curatorial/Knowledge, to provide the highest possible level of exchange between different researchers. All of our participants are young curators or artists working either institutionally or independently. The students come together 6 times a year for intense 3-day seminars. MRes students have 1 year of study in London combining these seminars with a dissertation project supervised by a personal tutor.

This programme is generously supported by FICA – Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (New Delhi) and Magic of Persia (London), funding one-year scholarships for a researcher from India and a researcher from Iran each year.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Stefan Nowotny.

Department

Visual Cultures:
Study in a department that combines an innovative approach with passionate academics, and makes full use of London's many opportunities to study art history.

Our approach

Our degree programmes deliberately move away from chronological histories: the innovative art of our time arises out of the conflict of ideas. So you’ll explore the subject in the context of pertinent social, cultural and political issues and phenomena.

That means not only investigating artefacts you might see in museums and galleries, but also those making up our everyday visual and technological environment: including urban landscapes, film and video, and popular culture.

Our academics

Our academics are passionate about the subject and are at the sharp end of theoretical developments in everything from architecture to spatial theory. Some are practising artists and curators, which makes our degrees relevant and exciting.

Our location

Our teaching takes advantage of the many galleries, art spaces, museums, cultural facilities and specialist libraries in London.

Skills & Careers

Students and candidates expressing their interest in Curatorial/Knowledge are often already professionally employed or active at a high level, including museum directors, museum or freelance curators, generators of self-organised spaces, artists and art critics. This means that you could develop an excellent network of professional contacts.

By completing an advanced research degree like this will also open up the possibility of teaching in higher education, and employment in museum research departments.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector. Read more
The Public History degree looks at how historical knowledge is produced, mediated and consumed in public spaces beyond the formal education sector.

Why study Public History?

Most people's sense of the past comes from public history, through film and television, fiction, museums, heritage sites and memory work.

This course looks at the kinds of pasts that are produced in these popular forms. It examines how they are made and the ways in which they are consumed and understood.

As part of your study you will be able to gain practical experience of working in a cultural heritage site, museum, gallery or archive.

The degree will help to prepare you for a career in public history related fields. It will also show you why the uses we make of the past are not just matters of academic interest.

Why St Mary's?

This is the only degree in the UK that is taught in partnership with The National Archives, which is a leading national and international site not just for archiving government documents, but also for engaging with the past in other forms.

You will attend workshops at The National Archives, delivered by their highly experienced staff and drawing on their wealth of original materials.

With the St Mary's campus located in South-West London, we also have excellent opportunities for field visits, and unrivalled links for volunteering and work experience with Hampton Court Palace, Strawberry Hill House, Turner's House, Sir John Soane Museum and Orleans House Gallery.

The degree is taught by historians with a strong record of publication and high-quality teaching.

Course Content

What you will study
› Public History
› Making Histories
› History: Spaces and Places
› Memory, History, Testimony
› Research Methods and Dissertation
› Professional Attachment

Please note: All information is correct at the time of publication. However, course content is regularly updated and this may result in some changes, which will be communicated to students before their programme begins.

Teaching and Assessment

Modules will be taught using a variety of modes – classroom-based discussions, field work, distance learning, work placements (where appropriate). You will write essays, produce project work, critique different types of source material, and learn to create work using a variety of digital tools. You will also design and deliver presentations about your work. In order to complete the MA, you will produce an extended, independent research project. This will either be a project based on your work placement or a text-based piece of academic research.

This course is designed to help you find a career in fields such as cultural heritage, archives, education and media. It can be used as part of your professional development if you are already employed in these sectors. It will also provide a critical and methodological platform for you if you wish to progress to doctoral level research.

Read less
New College of the Humanities Masters Programmes
Distance from London: 0 miles
Our innovative MA Historical Research & Public History provides advanced training in historical method, historiography, theory and the practices of historical research, in addition to exploring history as it is represented and debated in the public sphere. Read more
Our innovative MA Historical Research & Public History provides advanced training in historical method, historiography, theory and the practices of historical research, in addition to exploring history as it is represented and debated in the public sphere. It is comprised of seven courses that have been developed, and will be delivered by the History Faculty at NCH, led by award-winning academic, historian and broadcaster Dr. Suzannah Lipscomb.

This Master’s programme can be completed in one year (full-time), or stretched over two years (part-time). International students who require a visa are only eligible to study this programme on a one-year, full-time basis.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X