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Masters Degrees in Film Studies, London, United Kingdom

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This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the fields of film and media studies. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme is taught by staff from a wide range of departments at UCL, all international experts in the fields of film and media studies. Linguistic and cultural expertise informs our teaching on the film-making traditions of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and South-East Asia.

About this degree

The programme covers the history of cinema and a wide variety of world cinemas. It is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both the history of cinema and its contemporary developments, and with the skills, concepts, methods and theories required for the study of cinema and media at graduate level.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits and one non-credit bearing), three optional modules (90 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Moving Images: Technology, Forms, Receptions
  • Reading and Research Films

Optional modules

  • Ancient Rome on Film
  • Film Exhibition
  • Genre in Italian Cinema
  • Hollywood Genres
  • How to Make an 8-Minute Documentary
  • New Argentine Cinema
  • Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme
  • Political Cinema
  • Russian Cinema: Epochs and Genres
  • Spanish Film
  • The French New Wave
  • The Idea of Documentary
  • Theories and Practices of Film
  • Global Cinemas
  • Digital Media
  • East and South Asian Cinemas

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and film and video screenings. The core modules are assessed by essays and examinations, which together count for 20% of the final mark. Optional modules are assessed by essays (40%), and the dissertation makes up the final 40%.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Film Studies MA

Careers

Graduates from the MA in Film Studies have pursued various careers, including: academic research and teaching; careers within media arts (writing, directing, editing); print and media journalism; arts and museum management; multimedia authoring and digital design; film preservation and curating.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Digital Manager, Soho Create
  • Team Member, Cineworld
  • Web Content Writer, Rotten Tomatoes
  • Media and Film Studies Lecturer, City and Islington College
  • Production Co-ordinator, BBC

Employability

Former students of this programme have gone on to careers in education and publishing and a wide variety of careers in the media arts, including film production, festival programming, and film curation with organisations including the BBC, the Barbican Centre, the Athens International Film Festival, and the London Film School.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Each year, we welcome students from all over the world to our Film Studies MA. Under the aegis of UCL's Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII), students spend a year amongst a thriving, cross-disciplinary community of cinema scholars and research students.

We have particular research strengths in film history, film theory, and in an exceptionally broad range of national and regional cinemas.

UCL has made a major commitment to refurbishing its multimedia infrastructure for the study of film and related media. This includes building a significant collection of print and visual materials and new facilities for teaching and for film and media screenings.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Degree programme description. This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. Read more
Degree programme description
This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. If you have already studied film at undergraduate level, you will be able to deepen your knowledge here. If this is your first in-depth engagement with film, you will be introduced to some of the liveliest and most important chapters in the history of cinema. You will be able to pursue your own particular interests in a dissertation on a topic of your choice. The MA also includes an element of practical work and the study of production practices.

From the earliest days of British cinema, London was the location of most British studios and it remains the national focal point for studying film.
Our provision at Queen Mary is enhanced by our proximity to major cultural centres such as the British Film Institute, which includes the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Ciné-Lumière at the French Institute. The MA attracts high numbers of well-qualified applicants from the UK and overseas each year. It is both a valuable qualification in its own right and particularly useful for applicants wishing to study subsequently for an MPhil or PhD in Film Studies.

Degree programme outline
The core module spans two semesters and provides an introduction to film analysis and theory, an overview of national and transnational cinemas (focusing on films from the USA, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia and Latin America), and an outline of film history during the twentieth century. You will also be introduced to aspects of film production and practice, including the technology of photography and its use in the feature film, cinematography and the continuity system and its relationship to the development of directorial style.

You can also choose two single-semester optional modules from a range including:
• 9/11 and American Film
• Auteur Direction
• Comedies of Desire
• Films of Powell and Pressburger
• Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War
• Frame, Space, Time: Approaches to the Experiences of Film
• History, Fiction and Memory in French Cinema
• Hollywood’s Vietnam
• Introduction to Film Archives
• Married to the Mob?: Mafia representations in Hollywood and Italian Cinema
• Moving Landscapes: Film Geography and Contemporary European Cinema (subject to approval)
• Paris on the Screen
• Sighting Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Film.

You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. This arrangement is also extended to include an option offered as part of the MA in Global Cinema and the Transcultural at SOAS, the MA in Screen Studies at Goldsmiths, the MA in History of Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, the MA in Film Studies at UCL, or the MA in Contemporary Cinema Cultures at KCL.

Assessment
You will submit three essays for the core module, one of 2,000 words and two of 3,000 words, and one 4,000-word essay for each of the two options. At the end of August you will submit a dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Entry requirements
Applicants will normally be expected to have been awarded (by the time they are actually beginning the MA course) a first- or upper-second-class degree (or international equivalent) in a relevant field of study, for example in Literature, History, Film and Media, or Cultural Studies.

Career opportunities
Doing an MA is an essential prerequisite for an application to enrol for a PhD. If you are not interested in pursuing an academic degree, you will find that many varied opportunities may arise for which the MA in Film will be an appropriate training: media, teaching, PR, etc. There is no specific career for which the MA at Queen Mary is specifically designed to cater.

Further information
http://www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/

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This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories.

It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in film exhibition and archival practice, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media and MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway).

HIGHLIGHTS

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This course has been designed for students who want to deepen their knowledge of the world's cinemas and is taught at the leading centre for Film Studies in London. Read more

This course has been designed for students who want to deepen their knowledge of the world's cinemas and is taught at the leading centre for Film Studies in London. It offers an extensive range of options covering all aspects of film style, representation, spectatorship, and philosophical approaches.

Our perfect location close to BFI Southbank (including the BFI Library) Southbank Centre, and Tate Modern means you will be studying in the heart of London was access to fantastic resources. The course is ideal for careers in the Media Arts and related Culture Industries, or preparation for further study.

Key benefits

  • Internationally renowned staff.
  • Focus on cutting-edge ideas and developments in film culture.
  • Ranges across European, American and World cinema from highbrow to lowbrow.
  • Located in the heart of London.
  • Film & Philosophy pathway available.

Description

Contemporary film studies is a diverse, interdisciplinary field that incorporates a variety of approaches to the analysis of film and film culture. Our Film Studies MA builds on the research strengths of our distinguished staff to offer modules that examine a wide range of cinema styles and approaches to studying film.

We have designed this course for students who want to deepen their knowledge of the world’s cinemas and explore the very latest approaches to studying them. You will participate in a number of research activities, including a programme of lectures by nationally and internationally distinguished scholars, international conferences, twice-weekly 35mm cinematheque screenings, a focused graduate training programme, and a student-organised work-in-progress conference in May.

The course comprises five taught modules and research project leading to a dissertation.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 32 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 16 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We assess the majority of our modules through coursework essays (normally 5,000 words) and occasionally exams. For your dissertation, you will write a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word essay.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. Read more

This unique MA programme is based in a university but run by leading film practitioners, ensuring that you not only receive the highest-quality practice-based learning, but you do so in a university research environment where you learn to understand the world we live in. You have your own camera equipment throughout and there are two dedicated Mac Editing suites for this degree.

About this degree

Students will learn to devise a visual research project; to apply anthropological and social science approaches to documentary film work; to think critically about the relationship between form and content in ethnographic/documentary practice; using our professional level equipment, to master the technical skills needed to produce different kinds of films of different lengths for varied audiences; and to critically view and review film material.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (60 credits), two optional /elective modules (30 credits) and a project/diary (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filming and Editing
  • Students without a social science background at either undergraduate or Master's level also take Social Anthropology or another social science foundational module in term one as agreed with the tutor.

Optional modules

Students choose two of the following:

  • Anthropology and Photography
  • Documentary Film and the Ethnographic Eye
  • The Story and I - Finding the Form and/or Time and the Staged Index
  • One of the practical film-related options offered as part of Film Studies MA according to provision
  • One of the film history modules taught in the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES), or Departments of History or English, (for example, Russian Cinema in SSEES), details to be confirmed
  • An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities
  • An Anthropology or other social science module from the Faculties of Social & Historical Sciences, or Arts & Humanities

Dissertation/report

A major practical film project and diary allowing the students to demonstrate their mastery of the skills of documentary film-making in a film of 20–35 minutes.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of practical tutorials, seminars and masterclasses and assessed by camera and editing exercises and a written piece.

Placement

We facilitate two types of placements. Firstly, we will enable short-term internships at the film companies with whom we already have relationships through Open City Docs. Secondly, as opportunities arise students can work on collaborative or other film-making projects, such as the Doc in a Day workshops or UCL film productions.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Ethnographic and Documentary Film (Practical) MA

Careers

The programme equips students for careers in:

  • mass media including broadcast, cinematic and web-based moving image
  • film and TV industry as camera operators, producers, directors, editors, researchers
  • academia – ethnographic research, visual media and culture
  • marketing and research
  • communication and other media
  • archives, as well as cultural heritage organisations.

Employability

The increasing demand for social and scientifically trained moving image specialists in the years ahead will continue, if not accelerate. Many of the graduates of our existing programmes now work in organisations such as Ipsos Mori film unit, independent production companies, BBC World Service and BBC Education.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA will allow you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London, and from the many activities in film within UCL Anthropology. The programme is unique in using professional film-makers to teach within a truly pan-disciplinary university research environment. It provides outstanding access to camera and editing facilities.

UCL now houses London’s Global Documentary Film Festival, Open City Docs Fest, created by Professor Michael Stewart. You can participate in the curation and delivery of this festival; gain experience in the delivery of a major public arts event; and benefit from established partnerships with world-famous institutions such as the the Science Museum and the British Film Institute.

This degree provides three strands: non-fiction cinema and reportage based documentary; a 'Mixed Realities' strand (including VR, Augemented; and interactive documentary production).

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field. Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. . Read more
  • Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field.
  • Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. 
  • Learn to produce ‘video essays’, in which you may opt not only to write about films but also to edit footage and create your own original audio-visual criticism.

Summary

Study film and screen cultures while immersing yourself in the creative culture of London at film festivals, studios, galleries and pop-up cinemas. Our MA combines the study of mainstream and experimental film, contemporary television and the video-essay form, and includes the option to produce either a written or audio-visual dissertation.

This cutting-edge MA offers the opportunity for advanced studies in television and new media. Taught by leading figures in the field, the course allows you to engage with the most up-to-date research and to explore new approaches to audio-visual scholarship.

The programme includes first-hand engagement with cultural institutions across the city. Building on our links with festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, this MA is not only about studying film theory but also about immersing yourself in the wealth of screen-related events and institutions the capital has to offer. In recent years, our students have been on trips to the London Film Festival, the British Film Institute, the Scalarama Cult Film Festival, the British Artists' Film & Video Study Collection, and the Tate Modern.

As a student you will also become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC) which means you will be able to engage with new and emerging research by attending a range of guest talks, conferences, media masterclasses and research seminars led by industry professionals. In recent years students have attended an exclusive preview of comedian and producer Omid Djalili’s film We Are Many, and gained advice on how to be a success in the filmmaking industry from BBC producer and director Jonathan Taylor, and the producer of Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Gareth Wiley.

Our alumni go on to have successful careers in film and media. Here is what a few are doing after studying Film at Roehampton.

Content

You’ll develop your independent critical thinking by engaging in the programme’s four main areas:

Screen Cultures of London

In a series of visits to festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, you will gain first hand engagement with cultural institutions across London.

Cult and Quality Television

You will interrogate the dynamic role of television within the shifting media landscape, focusing on contemporary US television drama.

Essay Films and Video Essays

You will combine history, theory and practice, be introduced to the Essay Film form and be equipped with the necessary skills to make your own video essays.

Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web

You will undertake an in-depth examination of contemporary cinema through a global lens, taking in a variety of international films from big budget spectacles through to online films and mash-ups.

You will also choose between an academic dissertation and an audio-visual dissertation. The academic dissertation gives you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you. The audio-visual dissertation will provide the opportunity to undertake an innovative combination of theory and practice through the production of an extended audio-visual essay alongside a written critical reflection.

Modules

Here are some of the varied range of modules we currently offer:

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Testimonial

‘After I completed my undergraduate degree in Munich, Germany, I really wanted to do my postgraduate abroad. I wrote to some lecturers from different universities, but the lecturers at Roehampton were really friendly and helpful, so I knew this was the place for me.

‘After I finish, I’d like to work as a radio or TV presenter. Now that I have learned so much about the world of media from my postgraduate, I feel perfectly prepared for this kind of job’.

Dani Rothgang, International MA Film and Screen Cultures student

Careers

Careers in cinema and festival programming, media research, curatorship and distribution. The MA also functions as a pathway to a PhD for those pursuing a career in academia.



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Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. Read more
Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. It will enable you to develop a critical understanding of the importance of theory, method and analysis to the study of film, and you will be encouraged to test out original approaches, both in seminars and written work.

Key features
This MA offers the opportunity to carry out research into a variety of areas, including gender and sexuality on screen; religion, philosophy and film; censorship and ideology; industry and independents in New Hollywood; and cinema and media in the global context. You may also carry out research at the British Film Institute (the largest film archive in the world).

If you are interested in further research, this course provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD study.

What will you study?

You will study all that is new, vital and innovative in contemporary and emergent cinemas. You will evaluate and critically analyse a range of perspectives on cinema in light of contemporary developments, shifting cultural alliances and patterns of cross-fertilisations. In addition, you will be introduced to the main areas of debate in the history of film criticism. Current modules focus on American cinema (mainstream and independent), post-1960 British cinema, European cinema (with specialist studies on gender and sexuality, and place and identity) and world cinema (with case studies on South-east Asia, Latin America, India and Iran).

In writing your dissertation, you will demonstrate your ability to research a topic of your choice in depth, gaining a rigorous grasp of current theoretical and methodological debates relevant to the subject area, as well as an understanding of the historical and cultural context.

Assessment

Essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Film History Theory and Analysis
-Film Studies Dissertation
-Media and Cinema in a Global Context

Optional modules
-British Cinema 1960s to Today
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Special Study: Branding the Self: Celebrity, Identity and David Bowie
-Special Study: Getting High on Cinema. The Drug Experience Film
-Special Study: Screaming out Loud: International Horror Television and Film
-Vamps, Divas, Tramps, Lolitas

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This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in chosen areas of those media histories, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway) and MA Film and Screen Media with Film Programming and Curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. Read more

Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. We aim to equip you with wide-ranging skills, knowledge and critical awareness to meet your career aspirations in sectors in which moving images play a central role. Our curriculum incorporates an exciting variety of learning and teaching activities designed to foster your capacity for researching and rigorously analysing different aspects of film, television and moving images. You will have the opportunity to develop key skills for communicating about and with moving images across a range of contexts and platforms. You can choose to have a broad-based learning experience in film, television and moving image, or you can specialise in moving image curation and screenwriting via our suggested pathways.

The core teaching team consists of members of the Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. The course has close links with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), the leading research centre in the UK for arts and design, whose members include internationally renowned filmmakers, film and television theorists and historians, and moving image artists and curators. We combine research-enhanced teaching with classes delivered by film and television industry and moving image art professionals, in order to make sure that you develop the skill sets and the full range of critical awareness that is in demand and to deliver an exciting learning experience for you.

The course combines core and optional taught modules. The design and delivery of our taught modules draw on CREAM’s research excellence in documentary, Asian and European cinema, moving image curation, and television history. The coursework requirements for some modules are research essays or a combination of research essays and research-informed blog posts and presentations. Other modules require a broad range of research-informed professional modes of writing such as a screenplay treatment, a curatorial proposal or an exhibition review. You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research as a major part of your MA studies. In order to provide you with the flexibility to undertake a piece of independent research suited to your career aspiration, the final project module offers you the choice between writing a traditional dissertation or completing a theoretically-informed professional project such as a curating a film programme, writing and producing a series of themed blog posts, or writing a long-form screenplay.

Course structure

The course is taught in two modes: full-time and part-time.

Full-time Postgraduate students study 180 credits per year. For the award of MA in Film, Television and Moving Image, you must complete two core taught modules, four optional modules and a 60-credit final project module, for a total of 180 credits.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course

Core modules

Core modules provide you with a set of key skills for the theoretical, critical and reflective understanding of moving images.

  • Final Project (core)
  • Key Concepts in Film, Television and Moving Image (core)
  • Contemporary Issues in Moving Image and Screen Studies (core)

Optional modules

Optional modules give you the freedom to choose areas of specialisation. The course leaders can advise on which modules best fit your interests. You have the choice to pursue specialised interests through your choice of optional modules and coursework assignments. If you are not sure which optional modules to choose or fit your interests best, or which types of final project work to produce to best develop your area of specialisation, you should discuss this question individually with the course leaders and you should aim to do so early on in the academic year.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

  • Cinema Distribution and Exhibition
  • Documentary Aesthetics, Sites and Spectatorship
  • Film Programming and Moving Image Curation
  • Introduction to Scriptwriting
  • Longform Screenplay Preparation and Short Documents
  • Modern and Contemporary European Cinema
  • Researching Histories in Asian Cinema
  • Television Art: Aesthetics and Quality

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with key London exhibition and research venues such as the BFI SouthbankICALux and Close-Up, as well as key critics, theorists, curators and festivals. We offer field visits to these sites as well as festivals like the Rotterdam Film Festival.

Career path

Our graduates have found employment in small- and large-scale film and television companies as filmmakers, producers, distributors, and exhibitors. Others have gone on to organise film festivals, or to work in film-related magazines and journals as well as in international arts and culture sectors. Some of our recent graduates have gone on to pursue academic careers as researchers or doctoral students at the University of Westminster and elsewhere. As the UK’s longest-running postgraduate programme in film and television several of our alumni are pioneers of the discipline of film and television studies.



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Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme. Read more

Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme

If this degree were a film we’d be watching the beginning and the end. We think, like Walter Benjamin, that it’s in these moments – in their inception and their obsolescence – that you see the utopian possibilities of a form or social movement. 

The questions we ask

Are we in the midst of a beginning? What can we learn now from visual culture’s past? What’s happening to our bodies when we play a video game? What are the gestures involved in everyday life? How do our bodies relate to technology?

These are the kinds of topics we analyse on this MA. We want to go beyond the borders of a traditional film studies degree so we go back to the beginning of film history to explore what it meant to fashion yourself in an image, or for a society to see itself in an image. Then we explore how images gain meaning now, and where they’re going next. 

The processes we use

We’re interested in the evolution of the image, but also image culture. As photographs and films constitute more and more of our communication, we encourage students to try to put their thought into audio-visual form for some modules. 

For the MA’s Media Arts Pathway, you can make your own piece of work and submit it as part of the final project, the dissertation. Production values are not the focus for us. We’re interested in what you do with an idea.

The approach we take

We think learning is about trying to get hold of something you don’t know yet; wrestling with ideas you’re unsure of so as to work critically and imaginatively across multiple media forms. While we do look at films, we also investigate such things as contemporary gallery work, the city’s screens, computer and phone interactivity to reconsider our relationship to images.

We study our heritage of image taking and making not just to discover how that relationship has changed over time, but also to find jumping off points for own experimentation and try to create something new. 

As part of the University of London you also have the chance to explore one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other universities. Find out more on the Screen Studies Group website.

Modules & structure

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway

The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway

The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

  • two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
  • option modules to the value of 60 credits
  • a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

Our graduates go on to work in areas such as programming and curating, film and video distribution, and film and television criticism, but many also create their own careers. Twenty per cent of our graduates pursue PhD degrees. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. Read more
A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. In film exhibition today, the old and the new coexist: audiences still watch films in cinemas, but digital technology and the internet have multiplied ways of consuming moving images. Digital technology has also transformed the relationship between film and art: galleries and museums now routinely exhibit film in shows and installations. Film festivals are flourishing in new formats and locations as never before. These changes have profoundly affected practices of curating and programming.

This intensive (1-year, full-time) MA includes in its curriculum: the old and the new aspects of programming and curating; theoretical considerations of audience; spectatorship and reception; and the changing spaces and temporalities of film exhibition. The MA combines these strong critical, theoretical and academic foundations with site visits and internships in London galleries and exhibition spaces, as well as screenings and programming in the Birkbeck Cinema. Students will be taught by internationally distinguished academics and cultural practitioners such as Professor Laura Mulvey. Lectures from industry professionals and experienced curators provide a first step towards possible careers in art and film or for further research into the cultures of curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The award-winning Birkbeck Cinema is central to the course. The cinema is equipped with 35mm and state-of-the-art DVD projection, offering students the opportunity to experiment with programming and curating.
The Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image programmes conferences, screenings and film-related events of all kinds throughout the academic year.
The inaugural Essay Film Festival, jointly run by the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image and the ICA, was held in March 2015.
Located in central London, in the heart of historic Bloomsbury, Birkbeck is within easy reach of cinemas and galleries, as well as facilities such as the British Film Institute and the British Library.
Editing workshops with the Derek Jarman Lab enable students to experiment with the compilation and assemblage of archive material.

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. This places the programme at the forefront of postgraduate studies exploring moving image in its most creative form. The course offers a range of input from staff in filmmaking, and will enable you to develop a major body of practical work created within the context of a critical understanding of contemporary experimental film theory.

You will have access to our moving image resources and specialised filmmaking equipment, augmented by excellent technical and academic support. To complete a specific project brief, other materials will also be provided, enabling you to meet the learning outcomes of the course and/or project. However, if you choose to develop your own film options requiring additional resources, then you will have to meet any further costs associated with that. View a full list of our current moving image resources.

Key features
-The course provides an exploration of the relationship between film, moving image, sound and critical frameworks. This is supported by the excellent moving image resources at the Knights Park campus, including a moving-image studio, post-production facilities and high-end film equipment. One-to-one tutorials, seminars, exhibitions and discussion all feature in the programme.
-Taught by filmmakers, creative practitioners, curators and writers, including many off-site visits and visits by professional artists, filmmakers and curators. This includes the opportunity to participate in a public screening programme at BFI Southbank, and a seminar forum at FID Marseille International Film Festival.
-Every year, the course nominates a graduate to participate in the European workshop on artists' moving image at the Schermo dell'Arte film festival in Florence, where they receive professional mentoring.

What will you study?

The curriculum offers three distinct areas of critical and practical inquiry options, supported by a specialised seminar/lectures series: artists' moving image; independent film; and the materiality of film.

You will undertake self-initiated research supported by taught modules and an experienced group of research-active staff, and will explore the critical and historical frameworks within which experimental film work can be understood and conceptualised.

Assessment

Presentation and exhibition/screening/documentation, tutorials and seminar/discussion.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Experimental Filmmaking Practices
-Experimentation in Moving Image
-Masters Project (Exhibition and Research Publication)

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The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Read more
The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Our research aims for critical engagement with technologies, old and new, and poses theoretical, aesthetic and political questions associated with the rise of digital media.

The department is characterised by a strong research ethos, which has been enhanced by the foundation of the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, directed by Professor Laura Mulvey. Along with Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Research in Media and Culture (BIRMAC) BIMI brings together the research interests of staff across the College and offers a stimulating range of events for staff and students as well as support for PhD students. The department also hosts the London Screen Study Collection, a unique archival resource of films about London.

The research environment of the department benefits externally from the activities of the Vasari Research Centre, and from its participation in the London University Screen Studies Group, which is an umbrella organisation covering all aspects of screen study across the colleges of the University of London.

In addition to the Birkbeck Library, research students have access to the nearby Senate House Library, various libraries of the University of London colleges, the British Library, as well as other specialist collections and institutions in central London, including the British Film Institute library. They may also take advantage of practical film-making opportunities offered through the Derek Jarman Lab.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

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This international programme is an intensive and comprehensive exploration of the history of audio-visual and moving picture media, from the early 1800s to the present day. Read more
This international programme is an intensive and comprehensive exploration of the history of audio-visual and moving picture media, from the early 1800s to the present day. It encourages you to explore a wide variety of media in historical, sociological, aesthetic and anthropological terms, by drawing on distinct intellectual traditions of our European partners presented by the European experts in the field.

This innovative and flexible programme uniquely combines our strengths and experience in postgraduate teaching with the European excellence offered through our exchange programme with leading universities in France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands.

While abroad, your choice of modules will depend on the partner institution you attend. Each university has a specific strength and specialism, which should guide your choice of university as the year abroad aims to help you develop and deepen your particular film and media interests.

Our partner institutions

Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3
Università degli Studi di Udine
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano
Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense
Université de Liège
Ruhr Universität Bochum
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt
Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona
Université Lille 3
Università degli Studi Roma 3
University of Amsterdam
Université de Montréal.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The only such MA in the country that includes an international exchange with a set of prestigious European partners.
An introduction to key historical moments in film and related media history.
A wide range of option modules at Birkbeck, partner institutions and associated colleges of the University of London - build your own personal pathway.
Renowned UK and European tutors teaching their specialist subjects, and invited speakers who are leading figures in all aspects of the film and media field.
You will research culture with a large doctoral community, and guidance for the development of doctoral projects is enhanced by the European exchange programme and award-winning film centre with its state-of-the-art, professionally equipped cinema.
The purpose-built Centre for Film and Visual Media Research in Gordon Square houses teaching facilities and research projects that follow on from the AHRC Centre which Birkbeck co-ordinated in 2000-2005, and offers exceptional screening and reference opportunities.
The Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image was founded in 2012 to coordinate research in film and media across the College.
In addition to the Birkbeck Library, you will have easy access to the nearby University of London Library, the British Film Institute and the British Library, as well as other specialist collections and institutions in central London.
You will be encouraged to attend other lectures and screenings of interest organised by various research centres at Birkbeck and the University of London.
We attract a rich programme of visiting scholars and practitioners. There is a self-access centre for audio-visual materials and we have well-equipped computer facilities, including a multimedia laboratory.

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University of West London London College of Music
Distance from London: 0 miles
Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more

Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers

• animation

• video game trailers

• science fiction

• dramatic cinema

• silent film

• costume drama

• documentary and…

• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

  • Practical Composition 1
  • Practical Composition 2
  • Orchestration and Arranging
  • Score Production
  • Combining Sounds
  • Developing Your Career

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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