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Masters Degrees in Curatorial Studies, London, United Kingdom

We have 21 Masters Degrees in Curatorial Studies, London, United Kingdom

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Goldsmiths, University of London Department of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area. Read more

The programme is designed for students who wish to take up the challenge of contemporary curating as an artistic, social and critical undertaking, and who wish to develop their professional practice in this area.

This two-part programme is designed to develop professional and academic excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. It's aimed at curators and those with related academic and practical experience who wish to achieve professional excellence in their practice, to innovate in the expanding field of curatorial practice.

MFA Curating at Goldsmiths focuses in-depth on aesthetic, social, political and philosophical questions that are brought to bear in any place or at any event in which contemporary art is situated.

The programme is designed to provide a practice-led research context for students at any stage of their professional practice. 

It also enables you to experiment and innovate in the expanded field of curatorial pedagogy, to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis and extend your and other students' knowledge through this process.

Goldsmiths' MFA Curating programme is recognised worldwide for producing highly qualified curators and other arts professionals.

Our graduates find employment in top international museums, commercial galleries, auction houses, magazines, alternative spaces and not-for-profit organisations. Others choose employment as artist’s studio managers; arts education programmers; museum public talks and events organisers; gallery archivists and registrars.

Work experience

The Tate Modern annually offers two hands-on internships to Goldsmiths MFA Curating students, who are given the opportunity to work directly on an exhibition matched to the students' interests. Accepted Goldsmiths curating students are given details on how to apply for a Tate Modern internship prior to starting the school year.

Other institutions with which the Goldsmiths MFA Curating programme has collaborated on real-life curatorial projects include 176/Zabludowicz Collection, London; Form/Content, London; ICA/Fourth Plinth Project, London, and more.

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Modules & structure

In Year One, you're introduced to a series of curatorial concepts and practices through group analysis and guided research. There are also group seminars that look into significant ideas in philosophy and cultural theory to help you think broadly about your own practice

In Year Two, intensive workshops look in depth at a set of artistic and cultural themes chosen by the students. In Year Two you further develop independent curatorial research and practice, working either on your own ideas or with a London-based gallery or institution. The summer term of Year One acts as a transition to Year Two.

Government Art Collection

Each year, part 1 Goldsmiths curating students are invited to pitch an exhibition proposal to the Government Art Collection, using works from this important national collection as the basis for a contemporary art exhibition. The successful projects are realised during the final year.

Year one

Year two

Skills

Independent research and practice; public presentation; oral and written communication; project development; exhibition administration; concept development; collaboration; intellectual analysis; catalogue, essay and review writing; research organisation and presentation.

Careers

Graudates from the MFA in Curating go on to work in galleries and museums; as managers and directors in commercial galleries; independent curators; cultural policy makers, teachers and academics; writers and critics.



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MA Curating and Collections at Chelsea College of Arts focuses on developing the skills needed to curate a range of art and design objects within the context of public and private collections. Read more

Introduction

MA Curating and Collections at Chelsea College of Arts focuses on developing the skills needed to curate a range of art and design objects within the context of public and private collections.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- Practical skills to sit alongside critical reflection that helps our students develop a balanced approach to curatorial methods

- A course that focuses on working with contemporary and historic collections, exhibition design, concept development, marketing, press releases and budgeting

- To explore current critical debates, keeping up to date on issues such as participation, the artist-curator dynamic and thinking about the public realm

- Our curatorial team at Chelsea Space to provide training within an active and supportive curatorial environment, engaging students with the best examples of contemporary practice

- To have access to the Chelsea library Special Collections, which have a strong emphasis on modern and contemporary art and design

Structure

Phase 1: Analysis of practice and exploration of methodologies

Phase 2: Development and consolidation

Phase 3: Resolution

These phases are set within a credit framework of three assessed units:

- Studio practice and Advanced studio practice, which run sequentially

- Theoretical studies, which runs throughout the course

Studio practice involves evolving and developing a personal programme of studio work and related research. Theoretical Studies provides a framework for students to develop a critical research paper, enabling them to locate their ideas and practice in relation to contemporary debate on cultural and theoretical issues.

Throughout the course students participate in individual and group tutorials, developing their skills through Personal Professional Development workshops and on-line resources while the postgraduate talks are organised that introduce them to a range of visiting artists and practitioners.

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Read more
Run jointly with the Design Museum, this course is taught by leading curators and designers within the field. Through its projects at the Design Museum and with prestigious cultural organisations, including the British Council, Architecture Foundation, British Museum and the V&A, the course gives you the opportunity to curate live projects and build your own professional profile. Ambitious international projects are an integral part of the curriculum, and graduates have gone on to successful careers around the world.

Key features]
-As the course is taught in partnership with the Design Museum, London, you will benefit from the experience of studying at one of the world's best-known design museums.
-Professional practice modules at the Design Museum underpin modules on the history and theory of curating design taught at Kingston University.
-Work experience and study visits are an important part of the course.

What will you study?

You will gain a grounding in the professional aspects of curatorial practice as well as first-hand experience in planning and organising exhibitions. This practical experience will be supported by modules in history and theory, ensuring you have a thorough knowledge of the ideas and context underpinning the display and curating of contemporary designed objects. There is a strong emphasis on gaining key employability skills for the sector, ensuring a high level of professional development. We develop live projects with leading organisations such as the British Council, Crafts Council and V&A Museum.

Assessment

Curatorial project briefs, seminar presentations, essays, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Professional Practice
-Interpreting Contemporary Design
-Theory of the Contemporary Object
-Making of the Modern World
-Curating Contemporary Design Dissertation and/or Project

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The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. Read more
The Museums and Galleries in Education MA combines academic study with professional educational practice in museums, galleries and heritage sites, looking at influential contemporary and historic theories in museum and gallery education. This programme also enables international collaborations to take place across the academic and professional field of museum studies.

Degree information

The programme enables students to carry out a practical and theoretical study on education in museums and galleries. University-based sessions are supplemented by teaching sessions at national, regional and university collections. Additionally students gain flexible access to historic and contemporary sites and full-time students have a 20-day research-based placement in a museum, gallery or heritage site.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation and portfolio (60 credits).

Core modules
-Issues in Museum Studies
-Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice

Optional modules
-Alternative Models for Art Education
-Constructing and Interpreting Heritage Culture
-Contemporary Art and Artists in Education
-Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 14,000 words with a portfolio equivalent to 6,000 words for full-time students and a 10,000-word report for flexible students.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is undertaken by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) staff and visiting lecturers in a variety of forms including lectures, seminars, workshops, visual presentations with a substantial part of the programme involving off-site teaching in museums, galleries and heritage sites. Assessment includes 5,000-word assignments and electronic media.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as: education officers at historical sites, digital programme managers in national art and design museums, heads of learning, heads of interpretation and curation in museums and galleries, and heads of research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Learning Manager (Audience Development), Design Museum
-Programme Manager, Dulwich Picture Gallery
-Heritage Intern, South Somerset District Council
-Science Educator, Natural History Museum

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Museums and Galleries in Education MA has a long and distinguished history for both those wishing to learn about the educational potential of the cultural sector and those wishing to expand their existing careers.

UCL Institute of Education is ideally situated for students to make excellent use of an extraordinary range of institutions, many within walking distance of the Art, Design and Museology studios.

Moreover the MA works in close collaboration with the Art and Design in Education MA tutors and together they have created an international research-active environment in which to share knowledge and professional expertise.

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Royal College of Art School of Humanities
Distance from London: 0 miles
The first year combines learning through practical experience with historical, theoretical and critical reflection. Students work on various exhibition projects, and research and write two essays. Read more

First Year

The first year combines learning through practical experience with historical, theoretical and critical reflection. Students work on various exhibition projects, and research and write two essays. They also undertake a number of study trips.

Practical Projects
Students work on a portfolio of practical exhibition projects. Projects offered in the past have included: curation of a week-long artists’ retreat at Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridgeshire; curation of a section of CCA’s exhibition as part of the Goethe Institute Cultural Project Europea n; curation of a project at ACME Project Space, London
Teaching Blocks
The programme is structured around a series of intensive taught thematic teaching blocks. Recent teaching blocks have included: What is a Curator?; Performance; Art and the Public Domain; Moving Image; Coloniality; Exhibition/Audience. Block teaching is provided by programme staff and practising professionals, including curators, artists and critics.
Courses
In parallel with the teaching blocks and practical projects, a series of seminar-based and workshop-based courses led by programme staff run throughout the first year:
'Curatorial Practice' comprises a range of collaboratively realised curatorial projects. Participation in these projects is designed to equip you with the knowledge and understanding as well as the practical skills that you will need to curate exhibitions in a variety of contexts (commercial, institutional, etc.) and with a range of content (collections, film and video etc.) It involves active, practice-based thinking about ways in which exhibitions shape cultural history and enter curatorial discourse.

Critical Theory is designed to introduce and discuss critical concepts and theories of art and culture relevant to the production, consumption and interpretation and understanding of contemporary art.

Writing for Curators aims to equip students with three distinct skills related to writing: to develop a personal writing style; to write in the ‘range’ of voices required of curators and construct appropriate texts and documents; and to produce academic writing appropriate to MA level. The course is designed to complement the various real and hypothetical curatorial projects which students work on in the first year, as well as preparing them to produce a final dissertation in their second year. Each session is focused around a separate exercise in reading, writing or text analysis.

Second Year

Study in the second year is largely student-led and individuals are encouraged to develop and deepen their own research interests. Each student is required to produce a 6–10,000 word dissertation on a subject of their own choosing. This is submitted in draft form at the end of the summer break between the first and second year, for final assessment in the second year. As part of their second year work, students will realise a major exhibition project. In previous years, CCA has mounted successful exhibitions in the public gallery spaces of RCA, as well as collaborated with key art venues across London. The CCA programme affords the opportunity for students to work in a professional capacity as curators, utilising the gallery spaces of the College, as well as collaborating with art venues and partners in the public presentation of their work.

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Kingston University Kingston School of Art
Distance from London: 0 miles
This course is ideal if you are interested in pursuing imaginative, interdisciplinary, international museum study. It will advance your knowledge of contemporary developments in this vibrant and sophisticated area of culture, art and heritage industries, and provide you with transferable skills essential for the sector. Read more
This course is ideal if you are interested in pursuing imaginative, interdisciplinary, international museum study. It will advance your knowledge of contemporary developments in this vibrant and sophisticated area of culture, art and heritage industries, and provide you with transferable skills essential for the sector. Our underlying philosophy is to offer you a broad and engaging vision of, and approach to, contemporary museum, gallery and heritage practice, evaluation and innovating ideas around the institution and industry.

Key features

-This course provides an interdisciplinary study of museums and galleries. It offers a range of approaches to teaching and assessment based on the concept of creative research, including creative project work and practice-based research opportunities.
-The major project allows you to develop your own interests and gain valuable research and practice-based skills.
-Possible European destinations for field visits include Paris, Berlin, Rome, Stockholm, Vienna, Barcelona and Amsterdam.

What will you study?

The course examines contemporary issues and practices, including collection, interpretation, exhibition, space, place and the city, audiences and communities, institutional purpose, scenario planning and sustainable futures. You will study taught modules covering critical analysis and creative practice, and conduct research around the broad themes and subjects addressed by each module. Modules have been developed in collaboration with, and are taught with museums such as the Museum of London, National Maritime Museum, V&A, and Kingston Museum and Heritage Service.

Assessment

Essays, project work, portfolio, and dissertation (12,000–15,000 words).

About this course

You will study a series of dedicated taught modules that are concerned with issues of critical theory and analysis, research methodologies and creative practice. You will be expected to conduct research around the broad themes and subjects addressed by each module. This research will allow you to tailor your own path of study according to your particular interests and future aspirations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Ideas and Institutions
-Learning and Experience
-Exhibition an Encounter
-The Challenge of Change
-Major Project

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The Courtauld Institute of Art Masters Courses
Distance from London: 0 miles
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Read more
The MA Curating the Art Museum accepts 12 students annually and offers students a unique balance of lectures, hands-on experience and internship placements. Its purpose is to extend and develop graduates’ art historical interests, expertise and scholarship into the area of curatorship and active engagement with collections and exhibitions in the museum and gallery realm.

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The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Read more
The Archives and Records Management MA provides the skills and knowledge that are needed by new entrants to the profession in the United Kingdom and abroad. Students learn to manage and preserve records created in the present and those inherited from the past for use in the present and future.

Degree information

The programme focuses on the management of records and archives in a variety of digital and hard copy formats. Students learn to manage, organise, interpret and provide access to a wide range of records and archives, focussing on both the management of records for ongoing purposes, and their selection, preservation and accessibility for future uses including historical research.

MA students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to five years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules:
-Concepts and Contexts (30 credits, taught across two terms)
-Creation and Capture
-Curation and Stewardship
-The Record-keeping Professional
-Access and Use of Archives and Records

Optional modules include:
-Advanced Preservation
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Introduction to Digital Curation
-Information Governance
-Manuscript Studies
-Oral History: from Creation to Curation
-Reading and Interpretation of Archives from 1500
-Standards for Digital Recordkeeping
-Extended Practicum

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory sessions and class-based practical exercises, with a strong emphasis on group and peer learning and the acquisition of practical skills underpinned by archival theory and knowledge. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, presentations and practical assignments.

Placement
The work placement gives students taking the MA/Dip iexperience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken as part of the INSTG060 Curation and Capture core module just after the beginning of the third term (May). We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

Past graduates have taken up professional roles at prestigious organisations and institutions including national societies, university libraries and the House of Commons.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Assistant Record Manager, House of Lords
-Archives Manager, Historic Royal Palaces
-Project Archivist, Cambridgeshire County Council
-Archivist, National Motor Museum.
-Archivist, United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO)

Employability
This programme prepares students to work in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional archives and information management roles in both the private and public sectors, in the UK and internationally.

Students benefit from the department's excellent links with employers in the information professions which provide them with 'real life' experience through guest lectures, visits and a placement. Students also receive specific careers advice, including how to construct CVs. In the longer term the programme equips students with the skills and knowledge to have long and successful careers in their chosen field and become leaders in their profession.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL boasts one of the longest-established archive education programmes in the UK. It is taught by leading experts in the field, drawing on their innovative research as well as extensive practical experience of archives and records work.

Students benefit from UCL's location close to many records management services, and the broadest grouping of historical archives in any city in the English-speaking world.

The programme hosts an impressive range of visiting speakers, organises frequent field visits to a wide variety of working environments and a two-week placement, all of which provide unique occasions to network and create professional links with key players in the sector.

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University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations. Read more

Introduction

A unique course that creates an opportunity to explore both the theoretical aspects and practical challenges of curating contemporary fashion and historical dress in a wide range of formats and locations.

Content

MA Fashion Curation is a unique opportunity to investigate the ways in which fashion and dress can be collected and displayed, and offers the opportunity to engage with theoretical discussions and debates that underpin this exciting and growing discipline. Fashion exhibitions are a key part of the national and international landscape of contemporary society, attracting some of the largest audiences to major museums. Fashion exhibitions have also become increasingly visible in department stores, galleries and the wider community. This shift represents the growing status of the curator as a central cultural mediator.

MA Fashion Curation will equip you with the skills to enter this fast paced and growing field. A key aspect of this course is the practical skills and experience gained in staging a live fashion-related exhibition. This group project presents students with an exciting collaborative opportunity to explore a range of approaches, mediums and practices that constitute the roles required in realising a curatorial project.

The changing possibilities of curating and the curator are introduced and examined through seminars, workshops, and lectures, given by LCF researchers and lecturers and key industry professionals. Students are encouraged to undertake internships whilst on the course and past placements have been at Victoria and Albert Museum, Museum of London, Kerry Taylor Auctions, Alexander McQueen Archives, Rambert Dance Company Archives, Museum of the City of New York and Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Taught by a team of internationally renowned curators, including Professor Amy de la Haye and Professor Judith Clark, this course makes full use of fashion-related collections and archives both within and outside London to explore the issues and concerns that consume today's fashion curators. Areas that are explored with the MA include: displaying dress; creating 'stories' from objects; writing texts to target audiences; model-making; collecting, handling and archiving garments.

Our growing number of alumni can now be found in a perse range of organisations, including museums, galleries, universities, as well as developing freelance careers as consultants, archivists and curators.

Structure

15 months level 7 180 credits

Term One

The Past and Future of Fashion Curation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collect/Recollect (40 units)
Collaborative Unit (20 credits)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. Read more

Introduction

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. We create outcomes through which new understandings can be generated through critical writing and expanded forms of curation.

Content

This postgraduate course combines interdisciplinary and innovative research, using techniques of image, object and textual analysis, and practical work in handling archives, curating and writing. Its combination of critical engagement and creative skills bridges scholarly research and the cultural and creative industries. The Course aims to teach students to be high level researchers and innovative practitioners, responding to a need for professionals with a broad interest in cultural production and the skills to communicate this to specialist and general audiences alike.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is aimed at candidates with an interest in research and its application in organising cultural events. Students should be keen to collaborate and work in teams, as well as able to work alone. Taking advantage of its location in an art school, MA CCC is neither a ‘straight’ academic course, nor one aimed at training cultural managers. Rather it integrates theoretical issues and practical skills, interrogating history and working critically and creatively to consider how potential new knowledge can be presented in the public realm.

The course will make use of London’s wealth of collections, archives and creative practitioners, staging the teaching in relation to ‘live’ resources. Key focuses of the course are collections and archives, including those that are institutional, personal and /or produced in the context of creative art practices, which you will address from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Collections and archives are historical constructions as much as physical (or other), and the course encourages you to see them as discursive, technological, social and political.

The course is taught by a team of tutors who bridge academic research and writing and professional practices of criticism, journalism, art, exhibition design, curating and collections management, most of whom developed and currently teach on the successful BA Criticism, Communication and Curation: Arts and Design degree. We will support your acquisition of high-level critical and practical skills enabling you to work in the field of art and culture or progress to a research degree. MA CCC aspires to generate criticality, as a skill and mode of address, applicable both within and outside the Humanities. The course’s main aim is to take research based in the academic environment and make it accessible to larger or new audiences.

Structure

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation lasts 45 weeks, arranged across one academic year – 3 terms of 10 weeks – plus an additional 15 weeks of independent work.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is credit rated at 180 credits. It comprises two Units:

Unit 1, (60 credits), for the first 15 weeks of the course

Unit 2 (120 credits) that runs for 30 weeks.

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A two-year international course providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training, equipping you to manage and curate the digital information and digital assets of organisations across public and private sectors. Read more

A two-year international course providing a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical training, equipping you to manage and curate the digital information and digital assets of organisations across public and private sectors. Students study for one year at King’s and one year at Humboldt University Berlin, and choose from an exceptional range of options covering different aspects of digital curation.

Reasons you should consider the MA in Digital Curation are:

  • You will receive an outstanding education that will equip you to become a leader in the field of digital curation and information management.
  • Employers are looking for skilled professionals with knowledge and expertise in managing and curating their valuable digital information and assets.
  • You will study in two of Europe’s most exciting cities and have the opportunity to engage with cultural and creative sectors in both cities.

Key benefits

  • This unique course offers students an unparalleled opportunity to study at two world leading institutions: Humboldt University is the only higher education institution in Germany to teach information science, while King's College London is a leading institution for learning about the intellectual and technical exploitation of digital resources. Students will gain a rich and varied educational, social and cultural experience and a joint qualification from King’s and Humboldt.
  • Students will study in two of Europe’s most vibrant cities spending a year in Berlin followed by a year in London. These unrivalled locations allow students to experience a variety of different cultures, and access to some of the greatest cultural heritage and arts institutions in the world. Both King’s and Humboldt have close links with a range of cultural heritage and memory institutions in London and Berlin respectively and are able to offer internship opportunities and up-to-the-minute knowledge of the subject area.
  • The tutors offer cutting edge expertise in library, archive and information science, with specialist knowledge in digital technologies and processes. They come from diverse and highly interdisciplinary backgrounds, including running digital archives or working in the digital industries.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in a range of organisations, including libraries, museums, galleries, and archives; media organisations; publishing houses; government and industry; research institutions; healthcare and law firms.

Description

This King’s-Humboldt joint MA in Digital Curation is a two-year course involving one academic year of study at each institution. It offers you access to the combined talents of two world-class departments.

Digital content and digital technologies are a defining feature of our age. Digital data, information and knowledge are an asset for cultural heritage, memory institutions, industry, commerce and government. They are fundamental for research and practice in fields such as the law and medicine. As individuals we increasingly communicate and record our lives and our memories in digital form. But digital information is fragile and complex and requires ongoing and active curation as we seek to ensure its longevity and innovate in its use, and exploit its social, cultural and commercial value.

This course will give you the core skills, knowledge and competencies you need to become a leader in the rapidly expanding field of digital curation. You will study a wide range of subjects including metadata, preservation, knowledge representation, digital libraries, ethics and rights management, and new digital technologies and methods, including cloud and crowd-sourcing technologies. You will also have an opportunity to undertake an internship to gain workplace experience. We want you to acquire a great deal of practical knowledge, but even more we want you to develop your critical and reflective capacities, and to acquire an understanding of the inter-dependence of developments in digital processes, technology and curatorial practice. This MA will also provide an excellent grounding if you are interested in going on to a PhD in Digital Curation or a related area.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Curation is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in organisations and enterprises with significant volumes of digital information and knowledge. The course responds to the increasing demand for digitally literate professionals to work in education and heritage institutions, as well as wider industry by equipping students with a range of strategic, technical and practical skills to provide direction and leadership in the curation of digital information and assets.

Further literature

Take a look at Humboldt info here

Find out more info about preparing for your stay in Germany

Info about what you need to submit to enrol at Humboldt

Course format and assessment

Teaching

In your first year, Humboldt University will provide 300 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and they will expect you to undertake 1,200 hours of independent study.

In your second year we will provide you with 110 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 984 hours of independent study.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and exams.

Extra information

Students spend four semesters over the course of two years on the programme: two consecutive semesters at Humboldt and two semesters at King's, beginning the programme at Humboldt in all cases. 

All teaching will be in English.

More information about the Digital Curation programme at Humboldt.



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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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Richmond University Masters Courses
Distance from London: 0 miles
MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. Read more

Programme Overview

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating offers sustained engagement with the visual arts from an intercultural perspective, training students in marketing, public relations, development, management, curating and gallery education within a visual arts context. The programme brings art and design historians, theoreticians, professional practitioners and studio artists together to; 1) offer a thorough grounding in the interdisciplinary, theoretical and methodological issues related to the study of the visual, and 2) equip students with the professional skills and experience to work successfully in a variety of arts and cultural industries.

Why Study MA in Visual Arts & Curating?

MA in Visual Arts Management and Curating is designed to develop professional excellence in the field of contemporary curatorial practice. The course aims to develop Arts Management Leaders and Curators.

The programme focuses contemporary discourse and practice in curating and arts management
Archiving - Research and Relevance
Arts Curating Contemporary Arts/Historical Context
Public Relations and Marketing in the Visual Arts
Studio Art and Contextual Presentation
Commercial Perceptions and Value

Recent guest lecturers and visiting speaker

Danny Birchall, Wellcome Collection ; Russell Dornan, Wellcome Collection; Joanna Banham, V&A; Justine Locker, Tate; John Stack, Tate; Luisa Ulyett, Tate; Anita Bennett, Tate; Caro Howell, The Foundling Museum; Synthia Griffin, Tate; Emma Law, Camden Arts Centre; Jessica Stockford, Arts & Business; Kate Oliver, Horniman Museum; Tiana Tasich, Digitelling Agency; Matthew Cain, The Guardian; Claudia Lastra, The Arts Catalyst

Recent Study Visits – London

V&A; Tate; Wellcome Collection; British Library; Geffrye Museum; Serpentine Gallery; British Museum; Frieze Art Fair; Sotheby’s; Christies; National Art Library; British Museum; Camden Arts Centre; National Gallery; National Portrait Gallery; South London Gallery
Recent Study Trips – International:
Venice, Berlin, Istanbul

Core Modules

Arts Management & Marketing
Arts Policy
World Arts
Curating
Arts Education
The International Art Market

How to Apply

Apply online using the application form available at http://www.richmond.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate-admissions/ Please send your completed form to us by email to or by mail to the following address: Admission Office, Richmond, the American University in London, Queens Road, Richmond Upon Thames TW10 6JP, UK.

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A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. Read more
A first of its kind, this new MA in Film Curating explores both the traditional and the rapidly changing ways in which films are programmed by curators and received by spectators. In film exhibition today, the old and the new coexist: audiences still watch films in cinemas, but digital technology and the internet have multiplied ways of consuming moving images. Digital technology has also transformed the relationship between film and art: galleries and museums now routinely exhibit film in shows and installations. Film festivals are flourishing in new formats and locations as never before. These changes have profoundly affected practices of curating and programming.

This intensive (1-year, full-time) MA includes in its curriculum: the old and the new aspects of programming and curating; theoretical considerations of audience; spectatorship and reception; and the changing spaces and temporalities of film exhibition. The MA combines these strong critical, theoretical and academic foundations with site visits and internships in London galleries and exhibition spaces, as well as screenings and programming in the Birkbeck Cinema. Students will be taught by internationally distinguished academics and cultural practitioners such as Professor Laura Mulvey. Lectures from industry professionals and experienced curators provide a first step towards possible careers in art and film or for further research into the cultures of curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The award-winning Birkbeck Cinema is central to the course. The cinema is equipped with 35mm and state-of-the-art DVD projection, offering students the opportunity to experiment with programming and curating.
The Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image programmes conferences, screenings and film-related events of all kinds throughout the academic year.
The inaugural Essay Film Festival, jointly run by the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image and the ICA, was held in March 2015.
Located in central London, in the heart of historic Bloomsbury, Birkbeck is within easy reach of cinemas and galleries, as well as facilities such as the British Film Institute and the British Library.
Editing workshops with the Derek Jarman Lab enable students to experiment with the compilation and assemblage of archive material.

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