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Linguistics & Classics×

University of Edinburgh, Full Time Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics

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With a strong emphasis on developing skills and knowledge that can be applied in professional settings, this intensive programme draws on knowledge about language, how it works and how it affects real-life issues. Read more

Programme description

With a strong emphasis on developing skills and knowledge that can be applied in professional settings, this intensive programme draws on knowledge about language, how it works and how it affects real-life issues.

We were the first in the UK to offer a programme in applied linguistics, so you will benefit from a long-established tradition of teaching in this area, much of which is delivered by world-leading experts.

The programme offers a linguistic perspective on real-world problems of language in use, with relevance to a wide range of professional interests. You will explore how language is used in a variety of social settings, compare language variability with social diversity and examine how knowledge about language as it is actually used can impact on people’s lives.

Note that, unlike other programmes in Applied Linguistics, one topic that we do not concentrate on is teaching pedagogy. If you are more interested in the teaching side of Applied Linguistics, please see the MSc in Language Teaching http://www.ed.ac.uk/education/graduate-school/taught-degrees/language-teaching or the MSc in TESOL http://www.ed.ac.uk/education/graduate-school/taught-degrees/tesol.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation. Four compulsory core courses provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals of Applied Linguistics, while the optional courses offer you the opportunity to explore your areas of interest.

Compulsory courses:

Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Discourse Analysis
Issues in Applied Linguistics
Introduction to Language Research

Optional courses may include:

Special Topics in Sociolinguistics
Language and Identity in Bilingual Settings
Discourse Studies
Second Language Acquisition
Topics in Grammar and Discourse
Global Englishes
Corpus Linguistics
Pragmatics

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

develop your relevant critical and analytical skills
prepare you for employment in the various spheres of social life where linguistics knowledge and skills play a significant part
help you develop interest in working at the interface between linguistics and other disciplines
prepare you for further study (PhD) in Applied Linguistic

At the end of the programme, you will be able to discuss issues of language description and use the knowledge you have acquired to address real-life problems, such as the teaching of languages and the use of language in specific institutional contexts.

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help progress your career as a linguist in academia or as a language expert in a variety of industries such as artificial intelligence.

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This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan. Read more

Programme description

This programme will develop your understanding of how knowledge of language changes as people acquire or lose language at various points in their lifespan.

It is designed primarily for graduates with a background related to linguistics and/or psychology who wish to develop their knowledge of current research on language acquisition (first, second, bilingual, and impaired) and language change from a cognitive perspective and from the point of view of current linguistic theories.

Joining a vibrant research community of developmental linguists, you will have the opportunity to carry out advanced research to try to answer questions related to the area of language development and bilingualism, such as ‘how do children learn language?’ or ‘what happens when we forget a language?’

You will benefit from the programme's strengths in:

scope (with equal emphasis on first and second language acquisition and bilingualism)
interdisciplinary teaching (staff drawn from linguistics, psychology and informatics)
skill-oriented training (through methodology courses, lab sessions and project work)

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
Introduction to Syntax
First Language Acquisition
Second Language Acquisition
Psychology of Language Learning
Univariate Statistics and Methodology Using R

Option courses may include:

Sentence Comprehension
Discourse Comprehension
Language Production
Origins and Evolution of Language
Simulating Language
Child Bilingualism: Language and Cognition
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Data and Theories
Language Behaviours, Brains and Cognition: Principles and Approaches
Experimental Pragmatics
Developmental Language Disorders
Research Methods in Developmental Linguistics
Language Evolution in the Lab
Computational Phonology
Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research in language learning and development. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.

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This intensive programme offers an exciting opportunity to learn from world leaders in both informatics and linguistics. Read more

Programme description

This intensive programme offers an exciting opportunity to learn from world leaders in both informatics and linguistics. Drawing from our cutting-edge research, the programme’s content covers all areas of speech and language processing, from phonetics, speech synthesis and speech recognition to natural language generation and machine translation.

This flexible programme provides research or vocational training and can be either freestanding or lead to PhD study. The modular nature of the programme allows you to tailor it to your own interests.

Taught by leading researchers from Linguistics & English Language, the Centre for Speech Technology Research and the School of Informatics, this programme combines elements of linguistics, computer science, engineering and psychology.

You will develop up-to-date knowledge of a broad range of areas in speech and language processing and gain the technical expertise and hands-on skills required to carry out research and development in this challenging interdisciplinary area.

Programme structure

You study two semesters of taught courses, followed by a dissertation.

Most core compulsory courses have both computational and mathematical content. A few optional courses need a stronger mathematical background. Courses in the second semester can be tailored to your own interests and abilities.

Compulsory courses:

Advanced Natural Language Processing
Computer Programming for Speech and Language Processing
Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
Speech Processing

Option courses may include:

Advanced Topics in Phonetics: Speech Production and Perception
Automatic Speech Recognition
Introduction to Statistics and Experimental Design
Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition
Machine Translation
Natural Language Generation
Natural Language Understanding
Prosody
Simulating Language
Speech Synthesis
Univariate Statistics and Methodology using R

Learning outcomes

This programme aims to equip you with the technical knowledge and practical skills required to carry out research and development in the challenging interdisciplinary arena of speech and language technology.

You will learn about state-of-the-art techniques in speech synthesis, speech recognition, natural language processing, dialogue, language generation and machine translation.

You will also learn the theory behind such technologies and gain the practical experience of working with and developing real systems based on these technologies. This programme is ideal preparation for a PhD or working in industry.

Career opportunities

This programme will provide you with the specialised skills you need to perform research or develop technology in speech and language processing. It will also serve as a solid basis for doctoral study.

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This programme offers students the opportunity to focus in detail on a chosen area of the subject, while still being able to take some taught courses. Read more

Research profile

This programme offers students the opportunity to focus in detail on a chosen area of the subject, while still being able to take some taught courses. It is intended for those who already have a good background in Linguistics, typically from undergraduate study.

This is one of two MSc by Research programmes offered in Linguistics & English Language. You should choose this programme if you wish to specialise in an area of applied linguistics or sociolinguistics.

Programme structure

The main part of the programme will involve you writing a dissertation, and you should have an idea of the topic or area that you would like to write about when you apply. Students are given support in developing this topic during the year by an appointed supervisor and by dedicated training in research methodology.

Students are advised to take two taught courses (further courses may also be attended, but not for credit), which are offered from the wide range of subjects taught at Masters level within Linguistics & English Language.

The final mark for the programme will be determined by a weighted combination of the marks for coursework and the dissertation. In some cases it may be possible to register for a dissertation only.

Teaching will typically be in small groups, and supervision is organised on the basis of one-to-one contact with one or a small number of expert supervisors.

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This programme introduces the main fields, topics and research methods in ancient philosophy. It is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, or have backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature. Read more

Programme description

This programme introduces the main fields, topics and research methods in ancient philosophy. It is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, or have backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature. The programme is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, as well as those with backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature.

The degree provides a necessary preparation for further postgraduate research towards a doctoral degree or an academic background to a professional career outside academia.

You will be exposed to the main doctrines and texts of ancient philosophy – including Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle, Hellenistic philosophy and Late Antiquity – mastering analytical skills pertaining to philosophical arguments and to historical (textual) sources.

You will develop the ability to reconstruct, analyse and critically assess philosophical arguments and doctrines based on a careful study of the texts.

Programme structure

You study two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Ancient Philosophy Seminar I and II
Methodology Seminars in Classics
Option courses may include:

Ancient Ethics
Ancient Theories of Knowledge
History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition
Christian-Muslim Relations and the Relationship Between the World of Islam and the West
Ancient Theories of Existence
Ancient Theories of Mind
Topics in Hellenistic Philosophy

Other option courses can be chosen from outside Philosophy and Classics with permission from the Programme Director.

You are encouraged to take at least one course outside the ‘ancient’ curriculum, such as:

Introduction to Philosophical Method
Introduction to Mind, Language, and Embodied Cognition
Free Will and Moral Responsibility
Advanced Philosophical Method
Advanced Topics in Mind, Language & Embodied Cognition
Value Theory

Learning outcomes

You will enhance your knowledge and understanding of the main broad areas of ancient philosophy (Pre-Socratics, High Classics (Plato and Aristotle), Hellenistic philosophy, Late Antiquity) and medieval philosophy, specific types of philosophical thought (idealism, corporealism, naturalism, rationalism, skepticism) in their historical context.

An important goal of the programme is to develop the ability to reconstruct, analyse and critically assess philosophical arguments and doctrines on the basis of a careful study of the text.

For those planning to go on to a PhD in Ancient Philosophy, there will be an opportunity to enhance your knowledge of classical languages by studying the course texts in the original language. Up to 40 credits in ancient Greek, Latin or Arabic can be taken at introductory, intermediate or advanced level.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to improve your analytical skills and give you a solid background in core areas of humanities useful for careers in professional fields such as law, education or public policy.

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Drawing on the expertise of highly qualified researchers, this programme aims to enhance your practical skills in translation with an intellectual perspective on the discipline of translation studies. Read more

Programme description

Drawing on the expertise of highly qualified researchers, this programme aims to enhance your practical skills in translation with an intellectual perspective on the discipline of translation studies.

Learning through an effective blend of theory and practice, you will develop critical thinking on language use and translation, learn to implement various translation strategies and broaden your understanding of a variety of issues in relation to translation, such as gender, power relations and religion.

Programme structure

The programme is taught through a combination of lectures and exercises in practical translation, in conjunction with individual tutorials, student presentations and guest lectures.

You will complete four compulsory courses covering translation studies, research methods and practical translation, plus two option courses. After two semesters of taught courses you will work on an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Portfolio of Written Translation Exercises 1 & 2
Research in Translation Studies
Translation Studies 1

Option courses may include:

Reading Latin American Poetry
Ideology and Political Practice in the Modern Middle East
Chinese Silent Cinema: 1920-1935
Audiovisual Translation Research
Translation and Creativity
Contemporary Chinese Literature
The Great Russian Novel
Poetry, Music and Translation
Technology and Translation in the Workplace

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of this programme you will:

develop critical thinking on language use and translation
understand the key concepts of the academic discipline of translation studies
learn to implement the diverse approaches to translation prevalent within translation studies in the form of various translation strategies
broaden and deepen understanding of a variety of issues in relation to translation, such as gender, power relations, and religion
acquire important transferable skills

Career opportunities

This programme will give you the skills and confidence you need to take your interest in translation to an advanced level, either with a research degree or a role in a related field.

You will also graduate with a number of transferable skills, such as communication and research, that will help you gain employment in any area you choose.

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Our area of study is the languages, literatures and cultures of the Celtic and Gaelic peoples, from Iron Age Europe to the present. Read more

Research profile

Our area of study is the languages, literatures and cultures of the Celtic and Gaelic peoples, from Iron Age Europe to the present.

As a postgraduate research student, you will benefit not only from our highly regarded academic staff and impressive collection of research resources but also from our commitment to enhancing your research skills through a mandatory comprehensive training programme.

Our field of research spans a number of disciplines. Recent work has encompassed archaeology, divinity, education and linguistics, with thesis topics including Gaelic oral literature and Celtic history.

Our research interests include:

Scottish, Irish and Welsh Celtic literature and literary tradition in the Medieval and modern periods
the Gaelic languages and dialects
Celtic sociolinguistics and language policy

Training and support

A comprehensive training programme by the department of Celtic and Scottish Studies and generic training offered by the School and College is mandatory for all students. Generic training offered by the School and College is optional.

We use a combination of traditional and innovative methods to impart research training. Students are encouraged to make direct contact with original sources and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

Research training and expert research supervision are provided, linked to the specific research topic. Primary sources are emphasised and the combination of archive work and fieldwork particularly encouraged.

Facilities

You will have access to an outstanding range of facilities and resources for your research. The Celtic Class Library, which holds a wide range of specialist materials, and the larger Scottish Studies Library are situated within the department, and the National Library of Scotland is within a short walk. The School of Scottish Studies Archives include songs, tales and the Linguistic and Place-names Surveys of Scotland.

You will be given comprehensive training in the use of these resources, and will be encouraged to use original sources, and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading Medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

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This programme gives you the chance to develop your interest in Classics across the entire discipline. Greek and Latin literature and thought, Greek and Roman history, and classical art and archaeology. Read more

Programme description

This programme gives you the chance to develop your interest in Classics across the entire discipline: Greek and Latin literature and thought, Greek and Roman history, and classical art and archaeology. You’ll have the opportunity to study specific periods and regions of classical civilisation, analyse the literary significance of texts, and develop your language skills in Greek and Latin.

Drawing on the diverse interests of our academic staff, the programme content is highly flexible, allowing you to choose a specialised path or a more interdisciplinary approach.

We’ll also provide you with opportunities to hear from distinguished speakers in the weekly classics research seminar series and to share your research with your peers at the Classics graduate seminar. And besides this, you would be studying in Edinburgh, the Athens of the North, a stunningly beautiful city with a worldwide reputation as a cultural and academic capital!

Programme structure

The modular structure of the programme allows you to concentrate on areas of particular interest while still providing breadth of coverage.

There is one required training course in classical research methods and skills that runs across the two teaching semester (20 credits). This course is specially designed for classicists and aims to introduce you to areas of the discipline beyond your own specialities and to help you with the practical skills of finding and presenting information; it also equips you with the independent skills you need to complete your dissertation.

In addition, you will choose five courses from a list of options (each 20 credits). These enable you to work with increasing independence on advanced scholarship and prepare you for the final stage of the Masters, the dissertation (60 credits).

Learning outcomes

Students who follow this programme will gain:

an advanced knowledge of the archaeology/art and history of specific regions and periods of classical civilisation
an opportunity to study and analyse the literary significance of Greek and Latin texts and develop knowledge of current interpretation of them
an ability to comment in a detailed manner on passages from a selection of Greek and Latin
a developed knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages

Career opportunities

Designed to appeal to a broad range of students, this degree can form the stepping stone to many career options, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. You’ll also have a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work.

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This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman/early Christian period through their material remains. Read more

Programme description

This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman/early Christian period through their material remains.

The programme focuses on the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined: not just the archaeology of Greece and Rome but also areas of the Near East and north-western Europe.

Should your interests lie in a field that overlaps a related subject area, you’ll appreciate our interdisciplinary approach, which allows you to draw on the experience of staff throughout the School.

By choosing this degree, you’ll have access to the expertise of our academics who are all passionate about the classical period and its art, social history and archaeology.

By choosing courses of interest to them, each student’s programme will be different, and a further element of personalisation is provided in the choice of dissertation topic.

Classical Archaeology students also attend the weekly Classics Research Seminars, and form their own subsection of a lively graduate community in Classics.

Programme structure

We offer a modular range of courses, which has been designed to reflect the research interests of our lecturers and help you develop a particular topic of interest for your dissertation.

There is one required training course in classical research methods and skills that runs across the two teaching semester (20 credits). This course is specially designed for classicists and aims to introduce you to areas of the discipline beyond your own specialities and to help you with the practical skills of finding and presenting information; it also equips you with the independent skills you need to complete your dissertation.

In addition, you will choose five courses from a list of options (each 20 credits). These enable you to work with increasing independence on advanced scholarship and prepare you for the final stage of the Masters, the dissertation (60 credits). At least three of your five options courses should be selected from the core Classical Archaeology modules but Greek or Latin or Ancient History courses can also be taken.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

provide students with the intellectual background, training and support necessary for the conduct and critical assessment of research in Classical Art and Archaeology
provide students with advanced knowledge of and competency in a specific area of Classics
familiarise students with various methods used in the study of Classical Art and Archaeology and enable them to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged
equip students with knowledge of Greek and/or Roman artefacts and their interpretation through study of original objects and monuments and careful analysis of secondary literature
develop and test the ability of students to formulate and sustain a substantial piece of research in Classical Art and Archaeology

Career opportunities

After graduating, you will have the knowledge and skills in research methodologies that will put you in a good position to pursue doctoral research in classics or a related field, and ultimately an academic career.

Museum work, cultural heritage and education also present a range of professional options that require a degree such as this.

The learning, organisational and leadership skills you gain from your studies will give you a vital edge in impressing any potential employer.

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The MSc by Research in Classics is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Classics is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

Classics at Edinburgh continues a tradition that goes back to the University’s foundation in 1583.

We now boast one of the most significant clusters of scholars in the United Kingdom working in all the areas of the discipline.

We are happy to supervise across the full range of our research interests in:

Greek and Latin language, literature and thought
Greek and Roman history from classical Greece to late antiquity
classical Greek and Roman art and archaeology

We are able to supervise in related areas such as Persian history and reception studies.

Training and support

You will be assigned two supervisors who will provide expert academic guidance on your chosen research topic. You will meet regularly to discuss your progress and research plans, as well as drafts of your thesis/dissertation chapters, conference papers and potential articles.

In addition to individual supervision, you will also have access to research training and postgraduate seminars.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students are able to use two further large School study and resource rooms, which are open to all staff and students. There is access to lockers equipped with laptop charging facilities as well as standard lockers.

The building is wireless enabled and includes state of the art teaching rooms, meeting rooms, a common room, a refreshment area, and open social/breakout areas.

Programme structure

A long dissertation of 30,000 words is the sole form of assessment, but you will also attend compulsory training courses and may attend other relevant courses (especially languages).

Career opportunities

The programme’s focus on research under supervision makes this degree suitable for those contemplating doctoral study, here or elsewhere, and many who take this degree follow that route.

But undertaking a substantial and independent research and writing project is equally an excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.

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Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names. Read more

Training and support

Research and field collection in Scottish Ethnology encompasses the areas of oral narrative, song and instrumental music, material culture, social organisation, custom and belief, and place names.

Both oral and written sources are emphasised and Scotland offers excellent opportunities for fieldwork in Scots and Gaelic.

We use a combination of traditional and innovative methods to impart research training.

You will be encouraged to make direct contact with original sources and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

Research training and expert research supervision are provided.

Facilities

The School of Scottish Studies Archives includes over 12,000 hours of sound recordings, an extensive photographic and video collection, manuscripts, linguistic and place-name surveys, and donated collections such as:

the John Levy Archive of religious music
the Burton-Manning Collection of Appalachian oral tradition
the Will Forret and Gus MacDonald Collections of Scottish music
the Edgar Ashton Folk Revival Collection

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Teaching on this programme comes from three subject areas brought together under the new Centre of Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS). Read more

Programme description

Teaching on this programme comes from three subject areas brought together under the new Centre of Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS).

It offers the opportunity for regional and disciplinary specialisation depending on your own research interests and aims to introduce and prepare you to train for doctoral research in this field of study.

This programme takes advantage of Edinburgh’s remarkably rich scholarly expertise and offers an exceptional range of linguistic and disciplinary expertise in the study of the long late antiquity, embracing Arabic, archaeology, art history, classical languages and literature, history and theology.

Courses range from the Latin west to the Islamic near east, from literature through political, social, and religious history to art and archaeology. Linguistic training is a vital part of the programme, with courses available in four relevant languages.

Programme structure

The programme comprises a range of seminars, language classes and tutorials, which will include seminar discussion and debate, presentation to peers, directed and independent reading, as well as interactive language teaching.

The core course Approaches to the Long Late Antiquity will provide specialist methodological, theoretical and cross-disciplinary training. There will also be a compulsory language option in Classical Greek, Latin or Arabic.

Option courses may include:

Byzantine Archaeology: the Archaeology of the Byzantine Empire and its Neighbours AD 600–1,000
Constantinople, the City of a World’s Desire 300–600
Contacts and Conflicts Between East and West 600–900: the Pirenne Thesis re-examined
Greek Text Seminar
Latin Text Seminar Late Antique Visual Culture
Martyrdom and Voluntary Death in the Ancient World
Mosques, Palaces and Gardens in the Golden Age of Islam
Persian Painting
Roman Archaeology
The Fall of Rome
Rome Across Time and Space: Visual Culture and Cultural Exchange 300–1300
The Seven Ecumenical Councils 325–787
The Umayyad Empire: the Islamic World in its Late Antique Context

Learning outcomes

The programme emphasises acquisition of essential language skills for original research and close work with key historical and/or literary sources of evidence and grounding in the issues surrounding them.

You will gain an appreciation of the associated material cultures, including issues surrounding its recovery, survival and curation, which will prepare you for future academic research and prospective careers in aspects of museums and heritage management.

Career opportunities

This MSc is designed to provide excellent preparation for doctoral study, whether at Edinburgh or elsewhere. Alternatively the transferable skills gained in this programme will stand you in good stead to enter a wide range of professional careers.

Graduates of related programmes have gone on to careers including heritage and conservation, librarianship and secondary school teaching. Other students have pursued PhD study at a variety of universities.

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This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies
Option courses may include:

Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
The Supernatural World
Material Culture in Scotland
Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
the work itself
an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.

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This programme will give a comprehensive grounding in the theory and practice of phonetics. Students will learn the core phonetic topics of speech production, speech acoustics, and speech perception, and will learn how phonetics relates to many other language-related disciplines. Read more

Programme description

This programme will give a comprehensive grounding in the theory and practice of phonetics. Students will learn the core phonetic topics of speech production, speech acoustics, and speech perception, and will learn how phonetics relates to many other language-related disciplines.

The programme has a strong practical emphasis. It is designed primarily for graduates wishing to continue studying phonetics at PhD level, and for those wishing to use phonetics as a tool for investigation in related fields, e.g. historical linguistics, phonology, developmental linguistics, psychology, speech technology, etc.

The taught MSc in Phonetics will provide students with an intensive grounding in phonetics and related disciplines, its methodologies, research questions, and techniques of research.

Programme structure

Students will take options from a wide range of courses offered in Linguistics & English Language and related subject areas, and will write a dissertation project.

All students will be required to take two core courses in Phonetics and one core course in Statistics. Those students who do not have a strong background in phonetics and phonology may also be required to take an introductory course in Phonology & Phonetics.

Courses will include lectures, tutorials, and lab practicals.

Assessment is by coursework, project, and/or exams and a dissertation project.

At the dissertation stage, students are assigned a supervisor with whom they meet to plan their reading and to discuss their work.

Learning outcomes

The taught MSc in Phonetics will give students all of the intellectual and practical skills to engage in phonetics research, either for its own sake, or as part of research in another sub-area of linguistics, speech technology, or speech pathology.

Students graduating from our programme will understand basic anatomy and physiology of speaking and hearing, phonetic typology, current theories of phonetics and its relationship to phonology and other parts of grammar, and how to test these theories using empirical data.

We offer a strong focus on practical skills: students will learn how to elicit and collect phonetic data, the mechanisms involved in recording sound, how to measure and analyse acoustic and articulatory components of speech, how to create and analyse perceptual experiments, as well as core elements of scripting and statistical analysis.

Career opportunities

This course is primarily as a conversion course for students looking to do serious postgraduate work in phonetics, speech pathology, speech processing, forensic linguistics or related fields.

Students will also receive training in practical skills, e.g. statistics and computational techniques, which could be relevant for a variety of different fields.

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This MSc gives students all of the intellectual and practical skills to engage in linguistics research, either for its own sake, or as part of cross-disciplinary research. Read more

Programme description

This MSc gives students all of the intellectual and practical skills to engage in linguistics research, either for its own sake, or as part of cross-disciplinary research.

Students graduating from our programme will understand how to analyse key data in syntax, semantics, phonology, and morphology, how to theorise such data, and how to exploit empirical methods to test their theories.

The key aims of the programme are to:

provide specialist knowledge within the fields of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics
integrate relevant knowledge in those fields
establish a foundation for advanced research within phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics
provide a comprehensive understanding of the basic principles of research in theoretical and descriptive linguistics
develop the students’ analytical skills in an interdisciplinary context

We offer a strong focus on theoretical understanding: students will learn how to analyse data in the context of current theoretical understanding of linguistic structure at all levels, drawing on the expertise of the department, which is particularly strong in theory development, and will be well placed to compare and evaluate competing proposals, both from within the same theoretical model, and from competing models. Additionally, students will acquire the necessary data-elicitation skills, and skills in naturally occurring data in corpora.

All of these skills provide a firm foundation for further PhD study, either in Linguistics or in a related discipline that makes heavy use of core Linguistics (e.g. Developmental Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, etc.).

The programme is best suited to applicants whose academic background is in Linguistics, English Language, Philology or Cognitive Science.

Programme structure

The programme (a total of 180 credit points) requires students without a background in Linguistics to take the following five core courses totalling 50 credits:

Introduction to Morphology
Introduction to Phonology
Introduction to Semantics
Introduction to Syntax

Students with a background in Linguistics may be exempted from any or all of the courses at the Programme Director’s discretion.

Students will also need to choose, under the guidance of the programme director, additional course options (totalling 70 credits for students with no background) from an approved list of level 11 courses; students who are exempted from any of the courses listed will have to choose courses to ensure that their total number of credits excluding the dissertation comes to 120.

All students are expected to take Introduction to Language Research.

It is possible for students to take up to 20 credits of their optional courses from other MSc options offered within the School subject to the Programme Director’s approval.

All students will be required to write a dissertation of approximately 8,000-10,000 words.

Learning outcomes

Students graduating from this new programme will understand how contemporary research approaches the study of language.

Students will acquire and enhance the following professional/subject-specific/practical skills:

-general analytical (ability to construct, re-construct, critically evaluate an argument)
-organisational (ability to complete a project, setting up research goals, identifying necessary means and ways to completion)
-team- or group-work (presentations, in-class discussions)
-critical thinking (ability to select and evaluate the relevant data, such as experimental evidence or evidence from secondary sources)
-writing (how to convey purpose, motivation, method, results, and interpretation in written form)

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