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Linguistics & Classics×

Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics

We have 464 Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics

Masters degrees in Linguistics & Classics study the workings of modern and ancient languages. They develop a scientific understanding of linguistic theory as well as an appreciation for the relationships between language and culture.

Though associated with the humanities, these programmes are often quite scientific. They trace the evolution of languages and linguistic groups over time, examining their operation through grammar and vocabulary and considering the psychological significance of language use.

Note that degrees in this discipline are focussed on languages, rather than more general topics in history, literature and culture. There is some overlap, but students looking to study a Masters in subjects such as Ancient Greek or Roman history should search instead within History & Archaeology.

Why study a Masters in Linguistics & Classics?

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You will combine advanced study in historical and modern aspects of English language and English linguistics. This programme provides career opportunities in research, teaching, publishing and lexicography among others. Read more
You will combine advanced study in historical and modern aspects of English language and English linguistics. This programme provides career opportunities in research, teaching, publishing and lexicography among others. It is a research training Masters in line with Arts & Humanities Research Council practice and is an accredited part of the training programme of the Economic & Social Research Council Scottish Doctoral Training Centre.

Why this programme

-You will have access to Glasgow’s Special Collections, which has a large collection of medieval and renaissance manuscripts and early printed books.
-You will also have access to professional standard equipment for the analysis of speech data in the University’s Phonetics Lab.

Programme structure

You will learn through a combination of lectures, regular supervisions, formative essay writing and attendance at supplementary classes and seminars. Assessment includes a portfolio of essays.

You will undertake a number of core courses in historical and modern English language and English linguistics, including
-Phonetics and phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Lexicography, lexicology and semantics
-Discourse analysis and grammar
-English historical linguistics

You can also take courses on offer in some MLitt programmes in the College of Arts, for example,Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Classics.

You will take courses in research skills and methods. The second half of the programme is dedicated to your individual dissertation work, under the guidance of an assigned supervisor.

Please note that the availability of Core Courses depends on staff availability in any session; the availability of Option Courses depends on student take-up and staff availability in any session.

Core and optional courses

The components covered in Semester 1 provide a high level overview of core topics in English Language and English Linguistics. You will study current issues in these fields, which will provide the basis for independent empirical research in your chosen specified areas in Semester 2.
-Phonetics and Phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Discourse Studies
-English Historical Linguistics
-Early English Textual Studies

Dissertation

From April to September, students work on a short dissertation (15,000 words) linking directly to work undertaken in Semester 2 with their supervisors. The Dissertation can be an end in itself, but it is envisaged that it can also act as a pilot-study for, or a component part of, a subsequent doctoral thesis.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include teaching, publishing, digital analysis, journalism and lexicography. You can take advantage of opportunities to establish or advance your career as a writer or editor, or to work in museums, schools or academia. Other graduates have used their specialist knowledge to gain positions in the media or in business.

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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You’ll study modern languages in the context of the history and current theory of translation. You’ll learn how to use the standard strategies, procedures and techniques of translators, as well as enhancing your interpretative and analytical skills. Read more
You’ll study modern languages in the context of the history and current theory of translation. You’ll learn how to use the standard strategies, procedures and techniques of translators, as well as enhancing your interpretative and analytical skills.

We’ll help you develop your ability to translate from at least one language (current translation options are: from English into Arabic, Chinese, Polish and Italian or translation from Czech, Dutch, French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish into English).

Careers

You’ll develop the skills to work in translation, culture and communication internationally
or in the UK. Recent graduates have gone on to work for employers such as SDL, Transact,
The Big Word, Kaplan, the University of Leeds, the State University – Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Centre for French & Francophone Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University and as International Projects Director at a South Yorkshire College.

You may also choose to follow in the footsteps of students who have continued to PhD and have been awarded highly prestigious grants for PhD study such as Wolfson and WRoCAH scholarships.

Core modules

Concepts and Approaches in Translation; Translation Technologies; Translation Skills Modules; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

A range including: Approaches to Translation Genres; Localisation for Linguists; Language in Context; Film Translation of Literary Classics; Concepts and Approaches in Intercultural Communication; International Management; International Project Management; Enhanced Languages; Critical Reading and Writing at MA Level; Theory and Practice of Subtitling 1.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through lectures, seminars, small-group work and workshops. You’ll be assessed by essays, presentations, practical translation technologies projects, translation assignments, a translation exam and a dissertation.

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You’ll learn the theory and practice of screen translation, and gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to work in this specialised area. Read more

About the course

You’ll learn the theory and practice of screen translation, and gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to work in this specialised area. By studying the theory and working on practical subtitling projects, you’ll find out how the profession works and develop an awareness of the linguistic and cultural issues involved.

We’ll help you develop your ability to translate from at least one language (current translation options are: from English into Arabic, Chinese, Polish and Italian or translation from Czech, Dutch, French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish into English).

Your career

Our reputation for excellence means your MA will be highly respected by employers. You’ll develop the skills to work in translation, culture and communication internationally or in the UK. Recent graduates have gone on to work for employers such as SDL, Transact, The Big Word, Kaplan, the University of Leeds, the State University – Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Centre for French and Francophone Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University and as International Projects Director at a South Yorkshire College.

You may also choose to follow in the footsteps of students who have continued to PhD and have been awarded highly prestigious grants for PhD study such as Wolfson and WRoCAH scholarships.

About us

We constantly review and revise our degrees to make sure you keep on top of the latest developments in the field. You’ll learn academic theory and practical skills – and how to relate the two.

Sheffield is at the forefront of modern languages research. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us among the top ten Russell Group universities for impact in this field. Recent projects include e-learning and knowledge exchange with industry, and three initiatives looking at language teaching and learning.

Our facilities

You can practise your English, French, German, Italian or Spanish with native speakers at our Modern Languages Teaching Centre. Our specially designed building has modern spaces for teaching and research. We’re right next to the other arts and humanities departments, and there are lots of opportunities to share ideas.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Subtitling; Advanced Translation of a Language; Subtitling Project; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Film Translation of Literary Classics; Concepts and Approaches in Intercultural Communication; Critical Reading and Writing at MA Level; Approaches to Translation Genres; Language in Context; Intercultural Communication; International Project Management; Localisation for Linguists; International Management; Localisation
for Linguists.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through lectures, seminars, small-group work and workshops. You’ll be assessed by essays, presentations, practical subtitling projects, translation assignments, a translation exam and a dissertation.

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The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest. Read more
The MA in Linguistics aims to give you a general foundation in the central areas of modern linguistics, while at the same time allowing you to develop your own particular areas of interest.

Overview

The MA in Linguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in linguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in linguistic analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in linguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in linguistics

Course structure

The Autumn term comprises four modules in core areas of linguistics. In the Spring term you will choose two modules from a range of options, and begin a further core module on key ideas in linguistics which you will complete in the Summer term. The programme is completed with a research dissertation.

The modules in the Autumn term assume no prior knowledge and provide introductions to the core areas. The modules in the Spring term provide preparation for the research area in which you will complete your dissertation.

Autumn Term
Students take modules worth 40 credits in Autumn Term. The typical Autumn Term modules are:
-Language variation and change (10 credits)
-Semantics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits)
-Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules of your choice. Your options may include:
-Articulatory and impressionistic phonetics (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Phonological variation and change (20 credits)
-Second Language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Semantic theory (20 credits)
-Syntactic theory (20 credits)
-The phonetics of talk-in-interaction (20 credits)
-Topics in language variation and change (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

If you have covered substantial parts of the taught MA programme in your undergraduate degree, please talk to us about whether one of our specialist degree programmes may be more appropriate.

Spring and Summer Terms
In the second half of the Spring term and first half of the Summer term you will take a further core module:
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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The MA in Sociolinguistics will enable you to perform original research in the field of sociolinguistics by giving you a practical training in techniques and methodologies used in sociolinguistic analysis. Read more
The MA in Sociolinguistics will enable you to perform original research in the field of sociolinguistics by giving you a practical training in techniques and methodologies used in sociolinguistic analysis. You will also have the opportunity to develop your interest in areas such as the interface between variation and phonological and syntactic theory and empirical methods in the study of contemporary and historical data.

Overview

The MA in Sociolinguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in sociolinguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in sociolinguistic analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in sociolinguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in sociolinguistics

Course structure

Autumn Term
Students take modules worth 40 credits in the Autumn Term. The typical Autumn term modules are:
-Language variation and change (10 credits)
-Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the second term you will take two 20-credit modules, typically:
-Topics in language variation and change (20 credits)
-Phonological variation and change (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (80 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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As a student on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology, you will study the sounds and sound patterns of the languages of the world from cognitive and social angles, combining theory and data. Read more
As a student on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology, you will study the sounds and sound patterns of the languages of the world from cognitive and social angles, combining theory and data. You will be guided by academics who are recognized experts in their field, with specialisms in language change, acquisition, prosody, spoken interaction and sociophonetics.

Overview

Why do the sounds of languages change over time? How do we learn the phonologies of our first and second languages? Why do we have different accents? What information do fine details of everyday speech convey?

These are some of the many questions that you can pursue on our MA in Phonetics and Phonology. This MA programme is designed to familiarise you with a broad range of topics within phonetics and phonology and give you the necessary skills to develop your own research in these fields. You will learn how to collect and analyse phonetic and phonological data, and how to use it to answer theoretical questions.

You will be taught by a diverse group of researchers drawing on traditional and time-tested methods of analysis as well as cutting-edge technological advances. Our own research combines a focus on careful data analysis with a strong interest in theoretical questions. We hope to instill the same attention to theoretical and empirical detail in our students.

Aims
Our MA in Phonetics and Phonology will:
-Deepen your knowledge of phonetics and phonology
-Give you practical training in using auditory and instrumental techniques in phonetic analysis, as well as a range of computational methods
-Provide you with a strong background in quantitative and qualitative data analysis
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Train you to carry out original research in phonetics and phonology

Teaching and assessment

Teaching methods
We aim to give you practical training in the skills that are essential for phoneticians and phonologists as well as a firm grounding in theory. Our teaching methods reflect these goals: you will attend a variety of lab sessions, ear training classes and discussion groups besides more conventional lectures and seminars. You will also work closely with a supervisor who will help you develop your own research programme.

We encourage our students to be an active part of the research community here at York. You will have the opportunity to interact with researchers from within and outside the department, and to attend departmental colloquia where you can broaden your view of phonetics, phonology and linguistics in general.

Assessment
This MA programme comprises an overall 180 credits. A large part of this is made up by the dissertation, which is worth 80 credits. As a result, the decisive factor in determining the outcome of the MA is the dissertation.

For the taught modules, assessment is typically by an exam, a dossier of exercises or a short essay for the Autumn Term Modules, and by a 5,000 word essay or equivalent for the Spring Term Modules.

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The MA in Comparative Syntax and Semantics will allow students to develop their own areas of interest and expertise in generative syntax and/or formal semantics. Read more
The MA in Comparative Syntax and Semantics will allow students to develop their own areas of interest and expertise in generative syntax and/or formal semantics.

Overview

The MA in Comparative Syntax & Semantics is aimed at students who have enough background in both syntax and semantics to know that they wish to specialise in those areas.

The programme focuses on the cross-linguistic perspective, allowing students to strengthen their knowledge of formal syntax and formal semantics.

Course structure

Autumn Term
In the Autumn Term students will take 40 credits in Syntax and Semantics modules, typically:
-Issues at the syntax and semantics interface (20 credits)
-Comparative syntax and syntactic typology (20 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term students will take two 20-credit modules in Syntax and Semantics, typically:
-Advanced comparative syntactic or semantic typology (20 credits)
-Advanced topics at the interfaces of syntax (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (80 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

Assessment

Autumn and Spring Terms
Each module will be assessed by written assignments, usually a 5,000 word essay or equivalent.

Dissertation
The course culminates in a sustained period of independent research and the production of a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. You can see more detail on the programme and the department in the current postgraduate handbook.

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The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. Read more
The MA in Psycholinguistics will provide you with a general background in psycholinguistics while giving you a practical training in the techniques and methodologies associated with the field of study. You will have the opportunity to develop your interest in areas such as bilingualism, syntactic processing in special populations and early phonetic and phonological development.

Overview

The MA in Psycholinguistics will:
-Impart a general foundation and background in psycholinguistics
-Give you a practical training in techniques used in psycholinguistics, including statistical methods
-Enable you to apply your skills and knowledge to linguistic data
-Introduce you to research questions and methodologies in psycholinguistics
-Enable you to perform original research in psycholinguistics

Course structure

Autumn Term
There are two different routes in the Autumn Term, depending on your prior background. Students with no prior background in Linguistics or Psycholinguistics take the modules in Route A, below. Students who already have some background in these subjects take Route B. We will help you to determine which route you should take, when you apply.

Route A
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
-Language acquisition (10 credits)
-Psycholinguistics (10 credits)
-Syntax (10 credits) OR Phonetics and phonology (10 credits)

Route B
-Quantitative methods (10 credits)
AND 30 further credits from among the modules below and the modules in Route A:
-Advanced comparative syntactic or semantic typology (20 credits)
-Advanced phonology (10 credits)
-Advanced phonetics (10 credits)
-Emergence of structure from use (10 credits)
-Phonological development (20 credits)
-Directed readings in phonological development (10 credits)

Spring Term
In the Spring Term you will take two 20-credit modules from a range of options. Options may include:
-Topics in phonological development (20 credits)
-Bilingualism (20 credits)
-Learning mechanisms (20 credits)
-Second language phonology (20 credits)
-Second language syntax (20 credits)
-Psycholinguistic approaches to second language acquisition (20 credits)

Note that module offerings may vary from year to year. Not every module is offered every year.

Spring and Summer Terms
-Key ideas in linguistics (20 credits)

Summer Term and Summer vacation
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All terms
-Research training seminar (20 credits)

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MA in Linguistics by Research is available as a 1-year full-time and 2-year part-time qualification. The MA in Linguistics by Research is a research qualification open only to candidates who already have a sound grasp of linguistics and some specialised knowledge in the sub-field in which they intend to work. Read more
MA in Linguistics by Research is available as a 1-year full-time and 2-year part-time qualification.

Overview

The MA in Linguistics by Research is a research qualification open only to candidates who already have a sound grasp of linguistics and some specialised knowledge in the sub-field in which they intend to work. It should contain an original contribution to knowledge or understanding and should demonstrate mastery of the appropriate research methodology, literature and scholarly apparatus.

Programme

On this MA programme, you will complete research training with all other masters students in the department. Students also attend First-year doctoral seminar along with PhD students. This seminar will form the core of your training. It is a series of weekly meetings, running over three terms, at which beginning PhD students discuss the stages of research.

You will be assigned a supervisor who may also recommend that you attend certain taught Masters modules.

Assessment

Unlike the taught MA degrees, this degree does not involve assessed course work. Like the other research degrees it is examined by a specialist external examiner. The degree includes training in research methods, and such attendance at courses and production of written work as may be deemed necessary by the student’s supervisor.

You will be required to complete a dissertation of 20,000-25,000 words, which is submitted in September. The dissertation for this MA is longer than for the other programmes.

Normally you will not be required to present yourself for an oral examination, although you may be required to do so if requested by the examiners.

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Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. Read more

Our Ancient History MA offers you the opportunity to study Greek, Roman and near-Eastern history at an advanced level at the same time as learning and refining the techniques and skills that will enable you to analyse and interpret a variety of historical sources. This is an intercollegiate course that draws on the strengths of King’s, UCL and Royal Holloway and the Institute of Classical Studies. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Ancient History MA course is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the course combines the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

The course consists of a required module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two to four optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last of these will provide you with concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. You will also study texts in the original languages as well as in translation. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from our master's courses in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other master's courses at King's. 

If you have ambitions to take your study of ancient history further, there are modules on this course that you will find especially valuable: Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography. These will advance your technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence. You can also choose to take modules in Greek and Latin languages at beginners or intermediate level.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Our Department also regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This course offers the advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

 Assessment

We will assess your modules through a combination of coursework, essays and examinations, depending on your module choices. Typically, we assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or a 3-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000 words of coursework or a combination of coursework and examination, but this may vary. The dissertation is a 12,000-word essay.



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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.



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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. Read more

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy, papyrology.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK.
  • Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our Late Antique and Byzantine Studies MA covers an exciting and varied field of study spanning the history and culture of the Eastern Mediterranean world during the period that begins with the foundation of Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 330 and ends with the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453. As well as exploring the history of region through a variety of themes – history, literature, material culture, philosophy and theology – the course will also help you to develop proficiency in vital research skills, including the use of ancient languages (Medieval Greek or Latin), palaeography, epigraphy and papyrology.

This course is ideal if you have previous training in a related subject in the humanities.

Course purpose

For students whose previous training has been in a related subject in the humanities. To give a grounding in the subject, normally with a language-training element in medieval Greek or Latin.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will give you six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of self-study.

If you are a part-time student, we will give you two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of self-study.

For your dissertation, we will give five hours of supervision each year, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of self-study.

Assessment

We will assess you through a combination of coursework and examinations. Typically, we will assess 20-credit modules through a 5,000-word essay or three-hour examination, and 40-credit modules through approximately 10,000-words of coursework, or a combination of coursework and examination. You will take 180 credits of modules over your programme.

Your dissertation will be a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Some of our graduates continue their research in our department and elsewhere in the UK, EU and US. Others transfer the skills and knowledge they develop to careers in teaching, cultural management, general management, civil service and banking. 



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This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. Read more

This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. You’ll also work with students specialising in a wide range of languages to produce multilingual translation projects.

You can specialise in translation between English and one or two languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. In addition, you’ll be able to choose from optional modules informed by the research of our experts on topics such as audiovisual translations, machine translation and genre analysis.

You’ll be taught by both leading researchers and contracted practitioners through our Centre for Translation Studies, to equip you with a good knowledge base and practical skills to launch an exciting career.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. A core module will run throughout the year developing your skills through multilingual group projects, which also give you valuable experience of translation project management.

You’ll study another core module introducing you to approaches and research methods in translation studies, then choose optional modules to build your specialist written translation skills between English and one or two languages of your choice. You could also choose from any of the research-led optional modules exploring topics such as audio-visual translation or genre analysis.

Throughout the year, you’ll be sharpening your skills and developing your theoretical and practical understanding of translation. You’ll showcase this in your summer project, which you’ll hand in by the end of the course in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period. If you take the PGDip, you’ll study the same content but without completing the summer project.

Compulsory modules:

  • Computer-Assisted Translation 45 credits
  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. If completing the MSc you’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Applied Translation Studies equips you with valuable skills that are increasingly important in a globalised world. You’ll also develop advanced IT, research, analysis and communication skills that are very attractive to employers across different industries.

Many of our students go straight into practice with their translation skills, whether they work in large organisations, small or medium-sized language service providers or as freelance translators. Others pursue related careers such as project management or administrative roles in language services. They work in organisations such as the UN and affiliated organisations, the European Parliament and European Commission, commercial enterprises and NGOs.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



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