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Brunel University London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Law

We have 5 Brunel University London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Law

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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Read less
The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights. Read more

About the course

The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights.

This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs.

Furthermore, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM law course has proven to be of great interest to overseas candidates.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

Students receive a thorough grounding in the legal concepts and principles operating in the areas of law chosen.

They are given the opportunity to gain an understanding of areas of social and criminal justice policy where relevant and are introduced
to areas of controversy in their selected areas of law and socio-legal studies.

The Brunel Law School’s Masters of Law programme is designed to flexible enabling students to either broaden their proficiency in a range of areas or gain in-depth specialist knowledge of a particular subject of interest.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

EU Competition Law
International Criminal Law
International Criminal Justice
Corporate Law I
Corporate Law II
International Human Rights and Islamic Law
Theory of International Financial Regulation
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law
Privacy and Data Protection
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration
Philosophical Foundations of IP
Media Law and Regulation
Internet Law I -Substantive Legal Issues
Public International Law
European System of Human Rights Protection
Foundations of International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Multiculturalism and Human Rights
Patent Law and Practice
Trade Marks and Allied Rights
International Trade Law
International Environmental Law
Comparative Criminal Justice
Comparative Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law
Theory and Practice of International Human Rights
Practice of International Financial Regulation
Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
Human Rights of Women
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Americas, Africa, Asia
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights
Managing Intellectual Property
International Intellectual Property Law
EU Intellectual Property Law

Teaching

The classes are taught to groups of approximately 30 students. Tutors use a variety of teaching methods to deliver their modules. Lectures provide a structure for the module and give an overview of the subject matter. They will introduce students to new topics relevant to their modules.

Some classes will take the form of a lecture, others will be taught seminar style. Some may use a mixture of teaching methods (eg lecture, research, case law and problem methods), in order to promote a personalised learning that considers the individual student’s interests, needs and abilities. We believe that it is part of student experience to be exposed to different teaching styles.

There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over one of the teaching terms.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by:

- participating in research centre activities and research trips
- contributing to newsletters
- making oral presentations
- attending law film screenings
- participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible Start Times and Learning Options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
Brunel Law School benefits from very active research centres, which have hosted a large number of research seminars and workshops in the last few years. Many of these events focus on a wide range of issues and they tackle the latest debates in the industry with a number of highly respected guests. Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking, and it is important to us that all our staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE).  In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-Curricular Activities
Brunel Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
Brunel Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

The Graduate School
Brunel Graduate School offers postgraduates additional features for study and the opportunity to meet fellow postgraduate students from across the University, so you will have the opportunity to meet others studying for their master of laws degrees and socialise with fellow postgraduate students.

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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation of the growing discipline of financial regulations and corporate law in the international context. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation of the growing discipline of financial regulations and corporate law in the international context.

The programme focusses on the conceptual and theoretical aspects of substantive law and regulation in the field; the procedural mechanisms for the application of law; the challenges faced with the evolution of principles, rules and procedures; and the wider impact that regulations have on the wider society.

Beyond the conceptual and theoretical focus, the course also covers the practical aspects of financial regulation in domestic and international context. Brunel is one of the only law schools in the UK to offer this innovative programme.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in financial services industry, law practice and the academia or continue into research.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of corporate law and financial regulations.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a successful career in financial services industry, law practice and the academia.

The International Financial Regulations and Corporate Law programme provides students with the knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in these areas of law, to be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

The programme is designed to give as much flexibility as possible, in order to provide students to tailor their learning to their interests.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

Theory of International Financial Regulation (15 credits)1
Corporate Law I (15 credits) 1
Corporate Law II (15 credits) 2

Term II
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 1
Practice of International Financial Regulation (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I
EU Competition Law (15 credits) 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law (15 credits) 2
Privacy and Data Protection (15 credits) 2

Term II
International Trade Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits) 2

The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Dissertation

From the end of February, students will work on a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic in the field of their study. The dissertation is due at the end of the summer. This will provide students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of a particular area of interest. The dissertation has a value of 60 credits.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings, as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and have additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host seminars and workshops, which help to support students' learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights, and it is important to us that all staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE). In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers a comprehenseive scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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