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Keele University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture

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The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Read more

Overview

The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Arguably, nowhere are these developments more evident than in contemporary Europe.

On the one hand, European integration has undoubtedly challenged the role and powers of the nation state. While nation states remain in control of many aspects of domestic politics and policy, more and more policies are being shaped by decisions made at the European Union level. While these trends raise all sorts of questions about issues of sovereignty, democratic accountability, representation and efficiency, they also open up new opportunities for the nation states to cooperate more closely, and for the EU itself to develop further as a regional and global actor.

On the other hand, developments within nation states have challenged the ways political decisions are made and how citizens are linked with this decision-making. Traditional communities have become less cohesive, political loyalties have waned, and trust in democratic institutions has declined. At the same time, however, we have also witnessed the rise of new values, identities and actors. Together, these developments are putting pressure on longstanding patterns and processes of representation, political intermediation and decision-making and are challenging the traditional way of conducting politics.

This course is unique in the UK in that it examines developments within Europe through an interdisciplinary lens, combining political science and international relations perspectives with historical and cultural ones. This broad outlook is made possible by the range of expertise of the teaching staff at Keele and by SPIRE’s research strengths.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanpoliticsandculture/

Course Aims

The aims of this Masters course are to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to think critically about and develop an understanding of the political and cultural dynamics of contemporary Europe, viewed in a global, regional and national context.

In addition, the course aims to assist students in developing a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to their intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare students for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and non-governmental organizations, the European institutions, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management Reform
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

It is also possible to take a modern foreign language (other than English) as one of the optional modules. Language modules run over both semesters. Languages currently available are:

* French (beginners, intermediate, advanced, post A-level 1 or post A-level 2 level)
* German (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Spanish (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Japanese (beginners, intermediate or advanced level)
* Russian (beginners or intermediate level)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

American Studies

American Studies is a multidisciplinary department devoted to the analysis of the United States from the foundations of the republic to the present day. As a long-established centre of excellence in research and teaching, we aim to offer a supportive and lively environment for pursuing top-quality postgraduate courses.

American Studies at Keele enjoys an outstanding national and international reputation. At every level of the postgraduate programme our aim is to give both clear expectations and supportive guidance to enable you to achieve your goal.

Our tutors are all active in research, and our teaching reflects our specialist strengths. There is considerable cross-fertilization of ideas within the department, and consequently an interest in multidisciplinary work. In US History and Politics, tutors (Chris Bailey, Jon Herbert, Jon Parker, Laura Sandy and Axel Schafer) specialize in the history of the Civil War era and the American South, Cold War society, religion and politics, intellectual history, the politics of the environment, the US Congress, the American presidency, the politics of education, state and local government, and electoral politics.

In American Literature and Culture, tutors, (Ian Bell, Oliver Harris, James Peacock and Tim Lustig) have research interests in nineteenth- and twentieth-century, in contemporary fiction, relations between literature and science, African American literature, film noir, cultural theory and cultural memory, Anglo-American modernism, trauma theory, and the Beat generation.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

English

The MRes in English offers internationally recognised supervision in clearly defined pathways, with many different possibilities within each. They are:

- Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Writing (Contemporary British Fiction; Realism to Modernism: British Fiction 1880-1930; Postcolonial Fiction; Popular Fiction)

- Literature and Film (Postmodernism: Fiction, Film and Theory; Shakespeare; Gothic literature; Novels)

- Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (Writing and Culture in Early Modern Britain, Shakespearean Performance and Theatrical Repertories, Erotic Bodies, Sex in the City, Hamlet and Revenge, the Court Masque, Gender and Tragedy, Caroline Drama, Early Travel Writing, Puritan tradition, Jonsonian Theatre)

- Romanticism and the Long Nineteenth Century

- Literary Theory

- Material Culture

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Victorian Studies at Keele celebrated its 40th Birthday in 2008. It has now developed into a fully-fledged masters research preparation programme. Read more
Victorian Studies at Keele celebrated its 40th Birthday in 2008. It has now developed into a fully-fledged masters research preparation programme. Taught by internationally recognised figures in the field, it conforms, broadly, to the structure of Keele's MRes Humanities, while reflecting the distinctive interdisciplinary aims of the field by bringing together Victorian literature (poetry, novel and related prose), social and intellectual history, the history of science, the history of print culture, and frameworks for analysing the 'afterlives' of Victorian texts and cultural forms.

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The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice. Read more

Overview

The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice.

All students:
- follow a full research training programme
- take dedicated masters modules designed to deepen their understanding of issues in literature and theory
- choose an elective module from a variety of offerings, including modules from the MA in Creative Writing or from those offered as part of our English and American Literatures research-led undergraduate teaching
- work with a research-active supervisor to develop and pursue a dissertation topic of their own choosing

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/englishliteratures/

Course Aims

The Masters programme aims to enable students to:
- Engage in wide and varied reading among the regional and global varieties of literature and literary criticism.

- Think both critically and creatively about literature in English.

- Assess the form and meaning of literary and filmic texts.

- Develop their understanding of the characteristics of key literary genres (prose fiction, poetry, and drama) and periods (post-1500), and of the principles of canonisation that elevate and marginalise texts and their authors.

- Understand, evaluate, and apply to literary texts a range of critical ideas and theories relevant to textual criticism at Masters level.

- Communicate ideas and arguments with clarity and care in a number of different forms—including essays, oral presentations, reflective diaries—using appropriate language and techniques of presentation.

- Work both constructively and critically, by themselves and as part of a team, to deliver specific projects.

- Reflect productively on their strengths, weaknesses, and methods of learning.

- Develop research skills commensurate with postgraduate study in the field of English Literary Studies.

Teaching & Assessment

The function of the assessments listed in the table above is to test students’ achievement of the learning outcomes of the English Literatures Programme. For example:

- Essays test the quality and application of subject knowledge. They allow students to demonstrate their ability to carry out bibliographic research and to communicate their ideas effectively in writing in an appropriate scholarly style using appropriate systems of referencing.

- Critical Analyses of other scholars’ work test students’ ability to identify and summarise the key points of a text and to evaluate the quality of arguments and the evidence used to support them. Critical analyses also assess students’ knowledge of research methodologies and their ability to make critical judgements about the appropriateness of different approaches.

- Annotated Bibliographies test students’ ability to analyse and evaluate critically a range of secondary and source materials with a view towards specific areas of research.

- Project Outlines test students’ ability to plan, prepare, and structure a viable research project. They also test the students’ knowledge of relevant and important areas of research within English literary studies, and to assess the originality and impact of certain areas of research to the field.

- Reflective Study Diaries test students’ ability to engage self-reflexively with their study and practice within their field. They encourage students to develop a critical engagement with their modes and practices of study, learning and development of research topics.

- Short research papers test student’s knowledge of different research methodologies. They also enable students to demonstrate their ability to formulate research questions and to answer them using an appropriate strategy.

- Oral presentations, either by individual students or in groups, assess students’ subject knowledge and understanding. Where applicable, they also test their ability to work effectively as members of a team, to communicate what they know orally and visually, and to reflect on these processes as part of their own personal development.

- Dissertations test students’ ability to carry out independent research and communicate findings in an extended piece of written work following recognised academic standards of presentation.

Marks are awarded for summative assessments designed to assess students’ achievement of learning outcomes. Students are also assessed formatively to enable them to monitor their own progress and to assist staff in identifying and addressing any specific learning needs. Formative assessment is not formally marked. Feedback, including guidance on how students can improve the quality of their work, is also provided on all summative assessments and more informally in the course of tutorial and seminar discussions.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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