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Languages, Literature & Cu…×

Trinity College Dublin, Full Time Masters Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture

We have 13 Trinity College Dublin, Full Time Masters Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture

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This is an interdisciplinary course which provides an overview of European intellectual and cultural history, looking at Europe and its history from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Read more
This is an interdisciplinary course which provides an overview of European intellectual and cultural history, looking at Europe and its history from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It focuses on constructions and representations of identity, the emergence of the idea of Europe, political symbolism and nationalism, symbolic geographies and so on. The course builds on the inclusive, interdisciplinary approach of Trinity's undergraduate European Studies programme, but with a higher level of intellectual sophistication and breadth.

Course Content

The course consists of a compulsory two-semester module (carrying 20 ECTS credits), a number of optional one-semester modules (two per semester taken, each carrying 10 credits), and a dissertation (worth 30 credits). Each taught course module runs for an 11 week period within the 12-week semester, and meets once a week for a two-hour lecture or seminar. Teaching is spread over 22 weeks from September to the following April.

The compulsory (core) module, 'Europe and its Other(s): Ideas, identities and symbolic geographies in Europe', introduces a number of theoretical approaches to European intellectual, cultural and political history. Four optional single-semester modules are chosen from the lists below; these encourage students to apply and develop these approaches, with a focus both on distinct national or regional cultures and histories on the one hand, and/or specific issues and problems in European history and culture(s) on the other. A student may apply to the Course Committee, through the Course Director, for permission to take a relevant taught course module in another M.Phil. programme offered by the University. Not more than two modules from outside the European Studies M.Phil., and not more than one module from outside the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies, will normally be permitted.


Core component: 'Europe and its Other(s): Ideas, identities and symbolic geographies in Europe' (two semesters, 20 credits)

Optional modules

Figurations of European National Identities

Cultures of Memory and Identity in Central Europe

Representations of the Other Europe: Cinema in Communist and Post-Communist Central and Eastern Europe

Spain's European Identity

Intellectuals and Commitment


Optional modules available in other SLLCS programmes (subject to availability):

Literature and Exile

Moving between Cultures (second part)

The Aesthetics of Response: Ekphrasis and the Sublime


Optional modules available in graduate programmes in other schools (subject to availability):

Classics and European Identity (Department of Classics)

Government Institutions (Department of Political Science)

Government and Politics of the EU in conjunction with EU Policies (Department of Political Science)

Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe (Department of History)

History, Memory and Commemoration (Department of History)

Gender, Identity and Authority in Eighteenth Century France (Department of History)

Assessment

Assessment is by a submitted essay (3500-5000 words) in each course; each optional module will account for 10% of the overall programme mark. Students who meet the requirements and decide that they wish to continue for a research degree will be facilitated in registering in the September when they have submitted their M.Phil. dissertation, thus creating the possibility of moving straight on to the PhD register.

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The MPhil in Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship will enable entrants who have previously explored an area of creative study and practice (music, media, theatre, design, fashion, computer games, or interactive digital media) to develop a creative idea into an entrepreneurial project. Read more
The MPhil in Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship will enable entrants who have previously explored an area of creative study and practice (music, media, theatre, design, fashion, computer games, or interactive digital media) to develop a creative idea into an entrepreneurial project. The entrepreneurial activity may relate directly to a 'product' or 'process' arising from the student's creative engagement or to a form of 'expertise' or 'consultancy'. The programme will also equip students, who wish to work within existing organisations with the infrastructure and environment for setting up new creative businesses, with the capacity to flourish in a variety of creative entrepreneurial contexts.

Programme Content:

The programme consists of three mandatory taught modules and two optional modules chosen within a specialist creative practice strand. Students are expected to attend all taught components of the programme.

Students will take three compulsory modules: the core modules, History of Creative Industries, Theories and of Creative Practice, and Entrepreneurial Thinking/Modelling

In addition students will take two optional modules. The options available each year will vary. Those on offer in any given year will be divided into three strands and students will be asked to choose two optional modules from each strand. Students will have to choose modules within their specialist strand that do not conflict with the timetabling of other programme modules.

Students will also engage in a project/dissertation on an approved topic relating to the course.

The School will require part-time students taking the course over two years to take a minimum of 60 taught credits in their first year and they must be available for timetabled classes.

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Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. Read more

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. It is methodological by nature and multidisciplinary in scope involving the investigation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of information in electronic form.

Digital humanists do not only create digital artefacts, but study how these media affect and are transforming the disciplines in which they are used. The computational tools and methods used in Digital Humanities cut across disciplinary practice to provide shared focal points, such as the preservation and curation of digital data, the aesthetics of the digital (from individual objects to entire worlds), as well as the creation of the born-digital.

Why Take this Course?

This M.Phil. provides a platform for a technically innovative research path within the humanities giving students the opportunity to engage with a new and dynamic area of research. It provides them with the technologies, methodologies, and theories for digitally-mediated humanities providing a framework for new and bold research questions to be asked that would have been all but inconceivable a generation ago.

Course Outcomes

Those who complete this course will have highly specialised IT skills combined with an advanced understanding of how these skills can be applied to a wide variety of digital objects (text, image, audio, and video). It will also provide students with the theories and perspectives central to the field, including the aesthetics implicit in digital creation and migration, best practice in terms of the standards used for a number of data formats, as well as the growing concerns of digital curation and preservation. Through the internship programme students will get real world experience working with cultural heritage partners or digital humanities projects. Moreover, several modules will integrate content from these partners in their learning outcomes, providing opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge issues and technologies.

What's on the course?

This MPhil consists of three core modules and three optional modules. There is also a dissertation module in which a research topic is chosen in agreement with your supervisor.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities
Web Technologies
Internship at cultural heritage institution, library, or project
Optional modules (for the 2012-13 academic year):
Cyberculture/Popular Culture
Computational Theories of Grammar and Meaning
Corpus Linguistics
From Metadata to Linked Data
Programming for Digital Media (Full year module)
Contextual Media (Full year module)
Visualising the Past
Heritage Visualisation in Action
NB: Some optional modules require prerequisites

How is it taught and examined?

The taught component of the course begins in September and ends in April. Contact hours depend on the modules you take. Theory-based modules meet for two hours a week (such as 'Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities' and 'Cyberculture/Popular Culture'); practice based modules (such as 'Web Technologies' and 'Digital Scholarly Editing') typically meet for three hours a week to include lab time. Modules are assessed through a combination of essays, in-class presentations, assignments, and projects (either individual or group), depending on the module. There are no examinations. The supervised dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words is submitted by 31 August.

Applicants should have a good honours degree (at least an upper second, GPA of at least 3.3) in any of the disciplines of the humanities. The admissions process will be carried out in two stages. In stage I candidates will apply online and have the opportunity of submitting a sample of their own critical writing (3,000-5,000 words) and a cover letter. Those candidates passing this initial assessment will go onto to stage II that will take the form of interviews (either in person, telephone, video, or skype) which will be arranged by a member of the admissions subcommittee. Taken together, these stages will allow the admissions committee to assess the candidates' general suitability for postgraduate work as well as clarifying my query re on line application]

Applications are also welcome from professionals in the library and cultural heritage sectors. Those already in employment may opt to take the degree over two years: the first year all coursework is taken and the second year the dissertation is written.

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The course is aimed at experienced teachers of English as a foreign or second language worldwide. Read more
The course is aimed at experienced teachers of English as a foreign or second language worldwide. The programme gives practising teachers the opportunity to explore current issues in ELT, and to deepen their understanding of the theoretical and practical concerns that underlie their teaching.The programme benefits in particular from CLCS's involvement in the development and implementation of two Council of Europe tools that are important in the current debate about language learning, teaching and assessment world-wide: the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages and the European Language Portfolio. Students take six modules and undertake a research project leading to a 15,000 word dissertation. Four core modules are mandatory and two are elective options.

Core modules include:

Describing English Grammar
Language Testing
Pedagogical Grammar of English
Second Language Curriculum Planning and Implementation

The elective modules may include:

History and Globalisation of English
Corpus Linguistics
Technology, Language, and Communication
Language Variation and Change
Linguistic Pragmatics
Bilingualism and the Maintenance of Irish
Second Language Teaching
Multilingualism

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The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. Read more
The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. From the outset, questions of history, theory and context are brought to bear on issues of close analysis and interpretation. Elective modules in Screenwriting, Creative Documentary Practice and Editing allow students to balance film theory with practice. At every step of the way your progress will be informed by an emphasis on independent study and critical thinking. In addition, the course aims to develop the key transferable skills required for postgraduate study. These include dissertation preparation, time management and oral and written presentation.


The course consists of six taught modules and a Dissertation module that includes Research Methodologies.

Dissertation and Research Methodologies
This module prepares students for the formal processes of research and writing at M.Phil. level. Classes will cover library use, archival skills, electronic resources, use of Endnote, research skills, note taking, writing and oral presentation and power-point techniques. Students will write a dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words on an approved topic to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff.

In addition, students choose six of the elective modules listed below:

Aesthetics of Digital Cinema
This course traces the history of the development of the digital image with specific reference to its application to filmmaking. We will look at the analogue origins of the digital image and discuss the aesthetic implications of the shift to digital film. Further we will discuss developing models of criticism and their application to the digital cinematic image. We will be drawing examples from Western (Hollywood, Danish, British) cinemas and non-Western (Iranian) cinemas as well as from other outputs, such as YouTube.

Cinema and Ireland

This course will explore the history of Irish cinema from the 1930s to the present. It will also cover such areas as state film production policies, film censorship, and the history of Irish film distribution and exhibition. In addition, it will trace how British and American cinemas have represented Ireland and the Irish, and it will examine representations of political violence, history, gender and the cinema of the Celtic Tiger years, as well as current trends in Irish film production.

Current Trends in European Cinema
This course will look at and examine the changes taking place in cinema in Europe in the latter part of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This was a period that saw enormous transformation throughout the continent - both East and West - when the post World War II political dispensation collapsed and Cold War divisions crumbled. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent overthrow of the remaining Stalinist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe, the emergence of the European Union as a transnational political entity in 1992, and the globalisation of the world economy all impacted on the way in which films were made and the type of themes they explored and topics they tackled.

Cult Cinema
This module will examine a number of films that have acquired 'cult status' for a variety of reasons. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which these films have circulated in popular and academic discourses and the various attempts to identify 'cult' qualities and qualifying practices.

Melodrama
This module will consider a wide range of variations on the ‘melodramatic mode’, including examples from early cinema, classical Hollywood cinema, as well as current American and European cinema.Â

Editing
This module will introduce students to the craft of editing, giving students an understanding of the essential technical and creative skills involved: how a scene is assembled and seamlessly put together, cutting dialogue, creating tension and drama using editing, using pacing, editing to rhythm, cutting to music and beats. It will also provide students with a through knowledge of the editing software, Final Cut Pro X, covering all aspects of the software, from capture and system-settings, editing tools and shortcuts, to effects, transitions and colour correction. The overall aim is to give students the knowledge, tools and confidence to complete their own work to a professional standard.

Creative Documentary Practice
The aim of this module is expose students to the possibilities of creative documentary film making with a strong emphasis on learning thorough practical application. The module will take a critical look at current practices in the genre with an emphasis both on the techniques of documentary filmmaking and the practicalities of how films are made.

Screenwriting
This module will introduce students to the techniques and conventions of screenwriting. Class exercises will involve the analysis of screenplays and short films, and the course will cover both the conventional three-act structure and other models of screenwriting.

Please note: all modules are subject to change and/or availability. Students must take three modules in Michaelmas term and three modules in Hilary term, subject to timetabling.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and dissertation:

Each module will be assessed by a combination of written and/or practice based assignments as appropriate and class participation. Total ECTS: 60
Dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words and Research Methodologies assessment. Total ECTS: 30
Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma in Film Theory and History may be awarded in certain circumstances on the basis of coursework alone (60 ECTS). Entry is the same as for the M.Phil. programme.

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Over the last few decades the scholarly fields of American Literature, American Studies and Postcolonial Studies have undergone radical transformations. Read more
Over the last few decades the scholarly fields of American Literature, American Studies and Postcolonial Studies have undergone radical transformations. Their core concepts - including identity, race, citizenship, hybridity, and nationhood - have been challenged and redefined in fundamental ways both by creative writers and by theorists. This course - the first of its kind in Ireland and one of only a small number of similar courses in these islands - reflects on those changes and provides an exciting new postgraduate course of study for high calibre students.

This course provides an opportunity to engage in an advanced and detailed way with the literatures of the Americas. It stimulates fresh analyses of a wide range of literatures in English and in translation into English, by canonical, mainstream, avant-garde and marginal writers, and opens up research opportunities in this dynamic field. Students interact with texts in various genres and from different periods in their development of a complex sense of the literatures of the Americas, and the course promotes inter-disciplinarity as a key feature of its pedagogical approach. While the degree is complete in itself, the supervised dissertation of up to 20,000 words helps to lay a foundation for doctoral research in Postcolonial and/or American literary studies.

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This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. Read more
This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. At the same time texts that do not seem to belong to traditional canons increasingly attract critical attention, and have come to be taught at university level alongside more canonical texts. In this light the course will cover such popular genres as adventure fiction, children's literature, horror, detective fiction, romance, pornography and science fiction, as well as offering an advanced introduction to such topics as the bestseller, genre theory, print culture and readership.

The course comprises two elements:

A core course meeting twice a week for 2 hours over 2 terms
Option courses meeting once a week for 2 hours - students take one per term

This creates a total of 6 contact hours per week. Students are also expected to spend a substantial amount of time in library research. Assessment is a combination of four 5,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation to be supervised by a member of staff.

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This course is designed to provide an understanding of Comparative Literature as a subject of study and a critical practice. The core modules provide the theoretical and methodological basis for comparing texts of various genres and artefacts of different media at an advanced level. Read more
This course is designed to provide an understanding of Comparative Literature as a subject of study and a critical practice. The core modules provide the theoretical and methodological basis for comparing texts of various genres and artefacts of different media at an advanced level. Optional modules enable the further development of these competencies and offer opportunities to develop and apply this knowledge and these skills to a range of primary texts from a wide range of languages, cultures, epochs and other contexts.

The course consists of two core modules taken by all students (Theory and Methodology and Moving between Cultures), two options from the range offered in a given year, and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words whose theme and approach should be comparativist.

In order to be awarded the degree of M.Phil. in Comparative Literature candidates must satisfy the Court of Examiners by obtaining an overall pass in both the following components:

the assessment work for core course 1, core course 2, options 1 and 2 (combined)
the dissertation

The two core modules each contribute 20% of the overall assessment, the options each contribute 10% and the dissertation 40%.

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The M.Phil. course builds on the material presented in the Postgraduate Diploma in Old Irish. Applicants will therefore normally have successfully completed the latter course, though persons with equivalent competence in Old Irish but who have not successfully completed the diploma are also eligible to apply. Read more
The M.Phil. course builds on the material presented in the Postgraduate Diploma in Old Irish. Applicants will therefore normally have successfully completed the latter course, though persons with equivalent competence in Old Irish but who have not successfully completed the diploma are also eligible to apply. All candidates undertake core courses in Old Irish prose, Old Irish poetry, Primitive and Archaic Irish, Early Irish law and Middle Irish. In addition students attend a series of guest lectures organised by the department, and all undertake a dissertation of 20,000 words.

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There is widespread interest in literary translation as a form of literary study, and as a discipline that extends the reading and writing skills obtained in an Arts degree. Read more
There is widespread interest in literary translation as a form of literary study, and as a discipline that extends the reading and writing skills obtained in an Arts degree. Trinity College builds on its large and successful language teaching experience in creating a programme specifically designed for the production and study of literary translations.

The course brings together in an interdisciplinary framework, the expertise to create a unique programme for practitioners, future practitioners and students of the art of translation. The target language is English, but the following source languages are also available: French, Italian, Spanish, German, Russian, Czech and Polish. Where requested, we will try to provide support in other languages. The programme is taught by experienced lecturers, several of whom have published translated books, and by guest translators. It features a seminar in which students present and discuss their own work.

A graduate of the course will be well equipped to undertake literary, cultural, academic or philosophical translation, and will be qualified for employment in any area demanding intercultural awareness and excellent writing and analytical skills. The aim is to each translation as an art, and to form professionals who will have learned to work in an ethos of mutual intellectual and linguistic exchange.

The M.Phil combines two core courses, which address theoretical, linguistic and practical issues common to all, or most translation situations. It also provides a selection of specialized options, which include courses on the practical issues of literary translation and the comparative approach.

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This course is intended to provide graduates in related disciplines with a solid grounding in Old Irish language and literature. Read more
This course is intended to provide graduates in related disciplines with a solid grounding in Old Irish language and literature. Applications are normally accepted only from persons with a good honors degree in a cognate subject such as Modern Irish or another Celtic language, medieval languages, literature or history, archaeology.

The course commences with an introduction to Old Irish, proceeds on to Old Irish literature, including readings in lyrical verse, and also covers Old Irish glosses and saga literature.

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This course explores the relationship between textual and visual forms of apprehension and expression in the modern world and their impact on European culture post-1900. Read more
This course explores the relationship between textual and visual forms of apprehension and expression in the modern world and their impact on European culture post-1900. The focus of the core module is on the graphic arts (poster, postage stamp, typography), photography and cinema, and on contemporary digital-based media. Various theoretical approaches will be explored in relation to the word/image problematic which will be situated in a number of European cultural traditions. Course options focus on specific media (photography, cinema) or themes (the city, avant-gardes).

The aim of the course is to bring students to a high level of theoretical and practical awareness of the text-image relation in cultural expression, equip them to analyse and evaluate the various forms text/image interaction takes, and to provide them with a training that will enrich their practice in other areas of study or professional engagement.

The course consists of one core module stretching over two semesters and four one-semester modules (from a choice of 5 or 6). The first core module focuses on Word/Image relations in graphic design, ranging from posters and postage stamps to typography and logotype. The second core semester focus on word/image relations in photography, cinema and the digital media. The one-term options, two of which are followed each semester, include Text and Photography, Figuring European National Identities, Figurations of the European City, the Russian Avant-Garde and East European Cinema. A dissertation on a subject of the student's choice is prepared over the summer months.

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Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. Read more
Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. It addresses chronologies, genres, modes of criticism, publishing trends and the full apparatus of literary investigation across four centuries, while addressing the unique power dynamics that arise from adult authors writing for child readers. It is particularly concerned with multidisciplinary study because of the unique integration of words and images through the medium of picture books and graphic novels, and because its readership is more likely than any other to be 'technological natives' to have grown up taking multimedia approaches to texts for granted. Complete in itself, the course may also serve as preparation for those intending to proceed to further research in the field. Unique opportunities exist to work with the Pollard Collection, the bequest of more than 10,000 children's books left to the College by Mary 'Paul' Pollard, one time keeper of Early Printed Books, in 2005.

Course Content:

There are three elements:

i) Perspectives and case studies in children's literature (core module),

ii) Optional modules:
The child and Victorian literature,
Tolkien: books for children and children's literature,
Historical novels,
Young Adult fiction,
'Be Merry and Wise': the rise of children's literature.

Students choose one optional module in Michaelmas term and a second in Hilary term. Some of the options are shared with the MPhil in Popular Literature.

iii) Dissertation

Assessment is through four 5,000-7,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation.

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