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Linguistics & Classics×

Masters Degrees in Linguistics & Classics, Italy

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The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that places you in a strong position for further study for a PhD, or for careers outside academia that require research skills. Read more
The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that places you in a strong position for further study for a PhD, or for careers outside academia that require research skills.

The major civilisations of the ancient world still shape global culture today, with the Roman Empire spanning Europe, Africa and Asia. Our MA in Ancient History enables you to gain an advanced understanding of ancient culture, whether you focus on literature, thought, art or religion, and includes your second term spent in Rome, the heart of the Roman Empire.

A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially its capital city, through its novel Spring Term component taught at Kent’s Rome centre in collaboration with the American University of Rome. This allows you to gain direct access to Roman sites, museums and architecture, in order to see how the Roman Empire has shaped the city to this day. There is also a version of this programme that allows you to study at Canterbury only.

The programme allows you to develop your research skills and to become by the end of the degree an independent researcher, well equipped for future work for a PhD or to undertake research outside academia. The programme begins by focusing on research skills, which you study alongside either an option module or a language module (in ancient Greek or Latin). For the Spring Term, you choose two option modules that reflect the research interests of staff within the Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)
CL715 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL716 - Early Greek Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL723 - Early Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL724 - Early Latin Prose in the Original (15 credits)
CL820 - The Political, Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World:An (30 credits)
CL823 - Sexuality, Secrecy and Sin:Ancient Christianity and the World of Late A (30 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are chosen, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (http://www.aur.edu), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city alters brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

Term 1 (Canterbury):
Compulsory modules:

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:

CL828 - Rome: The Imperial City

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Rome: Writing the city

This upper level Classics course will examine depictions of the city of Rome in classical literature. It will examine the fabric of the city and the idea of Rome as a symbol of civilization. The buildings and public spaces of Rome were the backdrop for performance, spectacle, ceremony and daily and these activities generated meaning and symbolism. For the Romans specific locations were connected to history, myth and collective memory and were protected by the genius loci. Amongst others, the following authors will be studied: Cicero, Livy, Lucan, Ovid, Propertius, Tacitus, Virgil. All texts will be studied in translation.

Etruscan Art and Archaeology

This is an upper level course studying the art and archaeology of the Etruscans from their emergence at the beginning of the first millennium BCE until their absorption by the Romans. The course will take full advantage of the rich museum collections of Etruscan material in Rome and will include a field trip to the sites of Cerveterii and Tarquinia. The course will look at the origins of the Etruscans, their art and material culture, their interactions with other groups and their eventual absorption by the Romans.

Global Heritage

This upper level seminar course examines global heritage concerns looking in particular at how the past conditions the present and influences identity. Lectures and seminars will be built around four topics: the role of international organizations, heritage and memory, heritage and economic development and contemporary issues in global heritage. Each topic unit will be completed by a seminar where students will present case studies that illustrate the issues raised.

Term 3: Dissertation

CL897 - Dissertation
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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Learning outcomes -. This Second Cycle Degree Programme will provide advanced linguistic and cultural knowledge, analytical skills in the chosen foreign language as well as the necessary ability to interact with multidisciplinary and multicultural research groups. Read more
Learning outcomes -

This Second Cycle Degree Programme will provide advanced linguistic and cultural knowledge, analytical skills in the chosen foreign language as well as the necessary ability to interact with multidisciplinary and multicultural research groups.

According to their plan of study, students will acquire specific know-how in the historic, diachronic evolution of the language they choose, in the issues and tools concerning the teaching of Italian language, in the experimental phonetics and physics of acoustic (XML language, heuristic methods and accessibility indicators), in the linguistic tools to analyze language disorders and deafness, in the analysis of language and in the English language, culture and literature.

Languages available:

Albanian, Arabic, Czech, English, Hebrew, French, German, modern Greek, Italian Sign Language (LIS), Polish, Portuguese and Brazilian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish.

Curricula available -

• English Linguistics
• Language Sciences
• Language Sciences (in English)

Occupational profiles -

Second-cycle graduates may hold positions of high responsibility in linguistic education, international co-operation and international institutions, public utility services related to cross-cultural communication. Graduates may also deal with advance research on speech and languages at TAL research institutes and laboratories, carry out coordination activities in lifelong language learning programmes and in welcoming and Italian training of foreign students in schools, provide specialised consulting for multimedia publishing and communication, teach Italian to foreigners in Italian Cultural Institutes abroad, provide specialised consulting and collaboration within the medical research and finally work as communication assistants for the deaf and as experts of Italian Sign Language (LIS).

Attendance - Open attendance

Examination assessment and graduation -

Educational activities include classroom teaching, workshops and internships, in order to acquire wide-ranging skills that can be readily transferable into the world of work.

Knowledge gained by students will be assessed through written and oral exams during their entire university career.

The final exam consists in writing a thesis, which must possess the characters of originality, exhaustive documentation and scientific investigation and which will be discussed with a committee of university professors and experts.

Access to further studies -

Specialist Master’s Programmes (1st and 2nd level) and Research Doctorates

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Rome - Ancient and Modern is a unique programme that enables you to engage with the city of Rome as contemporary city with major archaeological, artistic, and historic significance. Read more
Rome - Ancient and Modern is a unique programme that enables you to engage with the city of Rome as contemporary city with major archaeological, artistic, and historic significance.

Students will be equipped to study the early modern art and architecture of the city, while at the same time be well equipped to engage with the remains from antiquity. There is no other programme that offers this combination and the opportunity to study on-site in Rome with the archaeology, the paintings, and the sculpture right in front of you.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (https://www.aur.edu/), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

For the term spent in Rome, you study the monuments and artefacts of the city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums. University of Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

Autumn term in Canterbury
- Research Methods in Ancient History (30 credits)
- Introduction to Research in History & Philosophy of Art (30 credits)

Spring term in Rome
- Rome –The Imperial City (30 credits)
- Discovering Rome in Rome (30 credits)
- Summer term through to end of August in Canterbury Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

All assessment is by coursework, involving a variety of written work, essays, a literature review, and a 15,000-word dissertation; and oral presentations, including a guided itinerary through Rome.

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