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Social Work×

Masters Degrees in Youth Work, Ireland

We have 3 Masters Degrees in Youth Work, Ireland

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Overview. Read more

Overview

The MA in Community and Youth Work integrates advanced study in challenging issues facing society today with accredited professional education for key roles in community development, youth work, and associated equality, human rights, international development, local development, local authority, national institutions, and international agency work. The programme provides an opportunity to engage in education and training in a dialogical environment, combining research and praxis for action, policy influence and advocacy, and participation in shaping society and facilitating young people to reach their potential.

Professional Endorsement:

The MA in Community and Youth Work [incorporating the Postgraduate Diploma in Community and Youth Work (PDCYW)] is endorsed by the North South Education and Training Standards Board as a professional qualification in Youth Work and by the All Ireland Endorsement Body for Community Work as a professional qualification in Community Work.

Commences

September

Course Structure

The programme in line with all postgraduate professional qualifications takes place over two years fulltime or three years part time in service. Students undertake a full time professional fieldwork placement lasting fourteen weeks in each year.

Duration: 3 years part-time in service



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Overview. Read more

Overview

The MA in Community and Youth Work integrates advanced study in challenging issues facing society today with accredited professional education for key roles in community development, youth work, and associated equality, human rights, international development, local development, local authority, national institutions, and international agency work. The programme provides an opportunity to engage in education and training in a dialogical environment, combining research and praxis for action, policy influence and advocacy, and participation in shaping society and facilitating young people to reach their potential.

Professional Endorsement:

The MA in Community and Youth Work [incorporating the Postgraduate Diploma in Community and Youth Work (PDCYW) is endorsed by the North South Education and Training Standards Board as a professional qualification in Youth Work and by the All Ireland Endorsement Body for Community Work as a professional qualification in Community Work.

Commences

September

Course Structure

The programme, in line with all postgraduate professional qualifications takes place over two years fulltime or three years part time in service. Students undertake a full time professional fieldwork placement lasting fourteen weeks in each year.

Duration: 2 years Full-time



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The aims of the project relate to developing an understanding of the experiences of young people exiting care through the conceptual/theoretical frameworks of youth transitions (see Henderson et al, 2007) and social exclusion (e.g. Read more

The aims of the project relate to developing an understanding of the experiences of young people exiting care through the conceptual/theoretical frameworks of youth transitions (see Henderson et al, 2007) and social exclusion (e.g. MacDonald, 2008). The research would potentially examine the factors that promote or inhibit the transitions (e.g. education; employment; housing; etc.) of young people exiting care. Given that this group have experienced restricted forms of social participation and involvement whilst in care (see Stein, 2006 & 2015), this research would provide a useful means of examining issues of youth transitions with this specific context. In particular, the study, following current debates within youth transitions studies (see Heinz, 2009), would aim to analyse the intersection between structural contexts, institutional frameworks and young peoples’ choice/agency as they progress from care. Equally, the research would be valuable in providing a space for the voices of a particularly marginalised and underrepresented group to be heard.

Methodology proposed

It is anticipated that the study will adopt a primarily qualitative approach, and will utilise semi-structured interviews as the chief method of data collection. This approach is emphasised as the research privileges the views and directs experiences of those involved in the process of exiting care in order to inform an understanding of key issues of relevance (see Parry & Weatherhead, 2014).

Intended participants are young adults that have made the transition from care to adulthood. It is also possible that relevant staff/practitioners working in this area may be included as participants; for example, social care practitioners, aftercare workers, social workers, etc.

Given the potential sensitivities and vulnerabilities of some of the participants and issues the research may work with, strict ethical protocols will be followed in relation to ensuring participation is voluntary and participants are protected from and safeguarded against harm.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

It is anticipated that the research would make a meaningful contribution, via conference presentations and publications, to our understanding of significant social issues by aligning theoretical ideas with empirical evidence. It would also be hoped that the study could provide substantive evidence to support recommendations for future practice and policy in relation to the provision of relevant services relating to residential care and aftercare.



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