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Masters Degrees in Social Work, Ireland

We have 14 Masters Degrees in Social Work, Ireland

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Social work is a challenging and a rewarding activity and requires a personal commitment to the ideals and values of the social work profession. Read more
Social work is a challenging and a rewarding activity and requires a personal commitment to the ideals and values of the social work profession. Those considering social work as a career option should be aware of its ethical and value dimensions and, in particular, the commitment of practitioners to the promotion of social justice.

The Master in Social Work course offers a route to a professional qualification in social work for applicants with a primary degree in the Social Sciences or equivalent. It combines an academic postgraduate award with the National Qualification in Social Work (NQSW). The professional qualification is awarded by the National Social Work Qualifications Board and the academic qualification is awarded by the University of Dublin.

This is a two year full time programme consisting of 16 weeks full-time academic attendance and 14 weeks full-time fieldwork placement in the first year, and 14 weeks full-time academic attendance and 14 weeks full-time field work placement in second year.

The programme is geared towards an international perspective and the student group can avail of placement opportunities abroad including Canada, England, South Africa and the USA.

Admission Requirements

Applicants should hold a level 8 primary social science degree (second-class honors or higher), or equivalent, and a minimum of 6 months relevant practice experience. There are up to 25 places on the course each year. All applicants are advised to read the following documentation which provides an overview of entry and course requirements to the Masters in social Work. M.S.W. Guidelines

All applications for the Masters in Social Work must include the following documents:

A breakdown and description of relevant work experience to date which indicates the total number of hours or weeks worked. The minimum number of hours applicants must have is 850.
Students are not required to provide 2 academic references instead they must provide one academic reference and one reference from their practice experience.
Students must provide a personal statement of no less than 500 words and no more than 1000 words.

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This new one-year online programme aims to provide graduates from all disciplines with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the need for effective implementable social policies. Read more
This new one-year online programme aims to provide graduates from all disciplines with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the need for effective implementable social policies. This programme considers prevalent contemporary societal challenges and examines the complex inter-relationships between social security, health, crime, family violence, inequality and discrimination. Students completing this course will gain a deeper understanding of the challenges facing policy-makers in attempting to be part of the solution. Students will complete modules on Criminology, Family and Society, Contemporary Social Debates, as well as introductions to Social Policy, Disability Studies and Social Work.

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CORU was established as Ireland’s multi profession regulator under The Health and Social Care Professionals Act (2005). CORU is made up of the Health and Social Care Professionals Council, and Registration Boards for each of the professions (currently 15) named in the HSCP Act. Read more

CORU was established as Ireland’s multi profession regulator under The Health and Social Care Professionals Act (2005). CORU is made up of the Health and Social Care Professionals Council, and Registration Boards for each of the professions (currently 15) named in the HSCP Act. The primary remit of CORU is to protect the public by promoting high standards of professional conduct, education, training, and competence (CORU, August 2016).

The Social Care Workers Registration Board (SCWB) was formed in March 2017 to undertake the required preparatory work to allow professional registration of qualified social care practitioners, currently scheduled to commence in 2020. As part of the pre-registration process CORU is engaging with practitioners and all parties involved in the education, training and employment of social care workers. Public consultation topics to date include Standards of Proficiency for Social Care Workers (SCWRB, May 2017) and Criteria for Education and Training Programmes (SCWRB, May 2017).

This study will explore the perspectives of Irish social care students in relation to the role and requirements of CORU registration and the implications for their profession and their professional practice. There appears to be no research to date which addresses social care students’ knowledge, understanding and perspectives on what CORU registration will mean for individuals and the wider profession. The input of students into the consultation process about the future of their profession would seem to be essential if the final agreed standards of proficiency and content of education and training programmes is to reflect and take on board the valuable insight and feedback from those currently undertaking professional training. This research aims to address the current gap in the literature by exploring the perspectives of social care students and presenting evidence on student perspectives for inclusion in the CORU consultation process.

Methodology proposed

A mixed methods approach. Stage one to consist of a survey of final year level 7 and level 8 social care students at three Institutes of Technology in Ireland. Stage two to explore issues arising at stage one in more depth. This will consist of semi-structured qualitative interviews with level 7 and level 8 social care students from the same three Institutes.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Deliverables:

Peer -reviewed journal publications and conference presentations. A contribution to ensuring that student perspectives are included in the CORU consultation process. These will be invaluable as educational providers make adjustments to align current educational provision with regulatory requirements.

Strategic impact:

Evidence based research on the content and criteria for education and training programmes in professional social care



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The M.Sc. in Applied Social Research is a taught Masters programme which can be completed on a one year, full-time or two year, part-time basis. Read more
The M.Sc. in Applied Social Research is a taught Masters programme which can be completed on a one year, full-time or two year, part-time basis. It is designed for graduates in the social sciences who want to develop their research skills and gain employment in the area of research. This Masters is equally suited to those who wish to build research skills for application in their current work environments. The course also provides a strong foundation for further post-graduate study, particularly for PhD research.

Using a combination of lectures, workshops and practical assignments, this M.Sc. programme trains graduates to:

Design and conduct primary social research using both quantitative and qualitative research methods;
Analyse the research data collected using a variety of computer programmes and;
Write and present research findings to a variety of audiences.
Initiated in 1997, the M.Sc. in Applied Social Research has established an excellent reputation in training students in applied research skills. Graduates of the M.Sc. in Applied Social Research typically gain employment in research institutes or consultancies, government departments, semi-state agencies, the NGO sector, and in a range of policy environments. Others go on to complete further post-graduate study.

The M.Sc. programme consists of three integrated modules: Qualitative Research Methods, Quantitative Research Methods, and Research Design, Accessing Resources and Research Ethics. Students also complete an eight-week work placement where they get the opportunity to work alongside experienced researchers/research teams within their host institutions. Students already in relevant employment can complete their work placement in that setting. Exemptions from the work placement may be granted at the discretion of the Course Director in exceptional cases.

A 20,000 word research dissertation is submitted by all students at the end of August (of Year 1 for full-time students and Year 2 for part-time students). This applied research project is initiated following the completion of all course assignments.

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There is a separate entry on admission to the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare. The programme is run on an in-service basis over one academic year, entailing attendance at an induction course and nine block weeks in Trinity College as well as the completion of course-related assignments in the workplace. Read more
There is a separate entry on admission to the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare.

The programme is run on an in-service basis over one academic year, entailing attendance at an induction course and nine block weeks in Trinity College as well as the completion of course-related assignments in the workplace. The multidisciplinary in-take comprises experienced and senior personnel from a range of relevant disciplines, for example, social work, public health nursing, education, community based and residential child care, psychology, An Garda Siochana, youth and project work. The course is designed to strengthen the capacity of the health, social service, education and criminal justice systems to identify and respond to the needs of vulnerable and abused children and their families. It is organised in close collaboration with the Department of Health and Children and the Health Services Executive. Candidates who successfully complete the Diploma course and meet the eligibility criteria for the M.Sc. in Child Protection and Welfare (see earlier entry under Taught Masters Programmes) may proceed to a second year to complete the Masters course.

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Overview. Read more

Overview

The MA in Community and Youth Work integrates advanced study in challenging issues facing society today with accredited professional education for key roles in community development, youth work, and associated equality, human rights, international development, local development, local authority, national institutions, and international agency work. The programme provides an opportunity to engage in education and training in a dialogical environment, combining research and praxis for action, policy influence and advocacy, and participation in shaping society and facilitating young people to reach their potential.

Professional Endorsement:

The MA in Community and Youth Work [incorporating the Postgraduate Diploma in Community and Youth Work (PDCYW)] is endorsed by the North South Education and Training Standards Board as a professional qualification in Youth Work and by the All Ireland Endorsement Body for Community Work as a professional qualification in Community Work.

Commences

September

Course Structure

The programme in line with all postgraduate professional qualifications takes place over two years fulltime or three years part time in service. Students undertake a full time professional fieldwork placement lasting fourteen weeks in each year.

Duration: 3 years part-time in service



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Overview. Read more

Overview

The MA in Community and Youth Work integrates advanced study in challenging issues facing society today with accredited professional education for key roles in community development, youth work, and associated equality, human rights, international development, local development, local authority, national institutions, and international agency work. The programme provides an opportunity to engage in education and training in a dialogical environment, combining research and praxis for action, policy influence and advocacy, and participation in shaping society and facilitating young people to reach their potential.

Professional Endorsement:

The MA in Community and Youth Work [incorporating the Postgraduate Diploma in Community and Youth Work (PDCYW) is endorsed by the North South Education and Training Standards Board as a professional qualification in Youth Work and by the All Ireland Endorsement Body for Community Work as a professional qualification in Community Work.

Commences

September

Course Structure

The programme, in line with all postgraduate professional qualifications takes place over two years fulltime or three years part time in service. Students undertake a full time professional fieldwork placement lasting fourteen weeks in each year.

Duration: 2 years Full-time



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This course has been designed to offer a broad critical understanding of how society attempts to prevent or respond to problems associated with the use of licit and illicit drugs, as well as a more specific opportunity to develop research, management and policy-making skills in this area. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a broad critical understanding of how society attempts to prevent or respond to problems associated with the use of licit and illicit drugs, as well as a more specific opportunity to develop research, management and policy-making skills in this area.

The course is aimed primarily at those who hold management or policy-making positions in any of the human service organisations which deal with drug and alcohol problems, but it also seeks to attract professionals who might play a leadership role in addictions work within their own professions.

Candidates from the first category might include: middle-ranking or senior civil servants or health board officials; directors or senior workers from voluntary drug and alcohol services; senior officials from the Probation and Welfare Service, the Prison Service or the Garda Siochana; members of Local Drugs Tasks Forces. Candidates from the second category might include: family doctors, community pharmacists, teachers, social workers, public health nurses, and other community care personnel. Candidates must have current or recent experience of either direct service provision, administration or policymaking relevant to the addictions field.

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There is a separate entry on admission to the P.Grad.Dip. in Child Protection and Welfare. Students interested in registering for the M.Sc. Read more
There is a separate entry on admission to the P.Grad.Dip. in Child Protection and Welfare.

Students interested in registering for the M.Sc. programme must initially register for the Postgraduate Diploma (see separate entry under Postgraduate Diplomas). Admission to the second year of this two-year part-time in-service M.Sc. programme is confined to candidates who achieve an upper second-class grade in the Postgraduate Diploma and whose research proposal for their M.Sc. dissertation is accepted. The second year comprises a series of lectures/seminars on organisational change and development, evaluation research methodology and related issues, entailing attendance at College approximately two days per month over the academic year. There is also regular contact with the student's assigned academic supervisor.

Please note there is no online application. Applicants must submit a M.Sc. Dissertation Research Proposal to Laura Cusack

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The aims of the project relate to developing an understanding of the experiences of young people exiting care through the conceptual/theoretical frameworks of youth transitions (see Henderson et al, 2007) and social exclusion (e.g. Read more

The aims of the project relate to developing an understanding of the experiences of young people exiting care through the conceptual/theoretical frameworks of youth transitions (see Henderson et al, 2007) and social exclusion (e.g. MacDonald, 2008). The research would potentially examine the factors that promote or inhibit the transitions (e.g. education; employment; housing; etc.) of young people exiting care. Given that this group have experienced restricted forms of social participation and involvement whilst in care (see Stein, 2006 & 2015), this research would provide a useful means of examining issues of youth transitions with this specific context. In particular, the study, following current debates within youth transitions studies (see Heinz, 2009), would aim to analyse the intersection between structural contexts, institutional frameworks and young peoples’ choice/agency as they progress from care. Equally, the research would be valuable in providing a space for the voices of a particularly marginalised and underrepresented group to be heard.

Methodology proposed

It is anticipated that the study will adopt a primarily qualitative approach, and will utilise semi-structured interviews as the chief method of data collection. This approach is emphasised as the research privileges the views and directs experiences of those involved in the process of exiting care in order to inform an understanding of key issues of relevance (see Parry & Weatherhead, 2014).

Intended participants are young adults that have made the transition from care to adulthood. It is also possible that relevant staff/practitioners working in this area may be included as participants; for example, social care practitioners, aftercare workers, social workers, etc.

Given the potential sensitivities and vulnerabilities of some of the participants and issues the research may work with, strict ethical protocols will be followed in relation to ensuring participation is voluntary and participants are protected from and safeguarded against harm.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

It is anticipated that the research would make a meaningful contribution, via conference presentations and publications, to our understanding of significant social issues by aligning theoretical ideas with empirical evidence. It would also be hoped that the study could provide substantive evidence to support recommendations for future practice and policy in relation to the provision of relevant services relating to residential care and aftercare.



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Interested individuals are encouraged to make an informal approach to the Department to discuss their proposal and establish an initial fit between their interests and the Department’s research priorities and expertise. Read more
Interested individuals are encouraged to make an informal approach to the Department to discuss their proposal and establish an initial fit between their interests and the Department’s research priorities and expertise. Formally, an applicant wishing to undertake a research degree should submit a research proposal in writing of 3,000–4,000 words and consult with the Department on the general suitability of the research topic, and on the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

The research proposal should provide the following information:
- Introduction to the central research topic that the student proposes to investigate
- Reference to the key debates and issues relevant to the research
- An indication the body of literature that the research will analyse; the main data that will be collected and/or analysed and the methods that will be used
- An outline of the potential significance of the proposed research for the field under investigation

Closing date
Research applications are generally accepted at any time

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To identify and critique how positive relationships with children in the EY are supported and nurtured. To identify good practice and make recommendations arising out of the project findings. Read more
  • To identify and critique how positive relationships with children in the EY are supported and nurtured
  • To identify good practice and make recommendations arising out of the project findings.

Methodology proposed

  • Identify & critique relevant literature
  • Survey
  • Interviews with pedagogical leaders, managers, key workers and parents
  • Focus groups
  • Observation of key worker interactions (with relevant ethical approval)

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Custom and practice in early years’ settings has tended to place the practitioner as educational manager or carer of a small group of children. The key person approach seeks to create a triangle of trust that the educator and parents build to support the child in the EY setting. (Elfer, 2007)

In line with our Strategic Plan (2014-18) this project has the potential of serving the local Early Years community by identifying good local practice. Dissemination of the recommendations and the outcomes could for the basis for critical reflective engagement CPD opportunities to be hosted by the Department.

This research project will also increase the research profile of the Dept. and contribute to the newly validated Master of Arts in Leadership in Early Childhood Education and Care.



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