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Politics & Government×

Masters Degrees in International Politics, Ireland

We have 14 Masters Degrees in International Politics, Ireland

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The objective of the course is to develop students' knowledge of international politics with a comprehensive empirical approach to understanding many prominent problems in contemporary world politics, especially topics where domestic and international politics cannot be understood in isolation from each other. Read more
The objective of the course is to develop students' knowledge of international politics with a comprehensive empirical approach to understanding many prominent problems in contemporary world politics, especially topics where domestic and international politics cannot be understood in isolation from each other. These topics include democratisation, international cooperation, development and foreign aid, international conflict as well as the politics of many environmental issues and their implications for the politics of developing countries. Students will also receive training in research methods.

This course aims to provide students with the necessary skills for a range of research-related careers in the fields of applied policy research, business, government, law, media, international aid, and international governmental and non-governmental organizations. It also will provide a solid foundation for progress to research PhDs.

The course is of twelve months duration, on a full time basis. Teachings starts in September and the M.Sc. concludes with the submission of a dissertation the following August.

The M.Sc. course consists of the following modules: International Politics, Democratisation, Development Policy, Principles of Research Design, International Environmental Policy, International Political Economy, International Organisation, International Conflict and Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods. In addition, students will complete a dissertaion of approximately 10,000 words in length. Students who fail to achieve a satisfactory mark for the dissertation element may be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Political Science.

Admission Requirements

Candidates should normally have achieved an upper second class honour degree, or higher from an established university. GPA scores of at least 3.3 out of 4, or equivalent, will be expected from international applicants. A background in a social science will be an advantage but not a necessity. Applications are expected from candidates with a single or joint honours degree in Political Science, Economics, European Studies, History, Sociology, Business and Law.

Applicants must, in addition to the College requirement to provide academic transcripts and two letters of recommendation, provide a motivation letter and one piece of written work (for example an undergraduate dissertation or essay).

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Overview. Read more

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to protect vulnerable groups, including minorities, migrants and peoples with disabilities. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and politics, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Work placement opportunities are available as part of the programme with partner civil society organisations including the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, Transparency International, the Irish Penal Reform Trust, Trócaire and Oxfam.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations and workshops. Students will also benefit from guest lectures delivered by international speakers. The programme is very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the fields of international law and human rights, and to non-law graduates who are interested in questions of social justice and in acquiring legal tools and skills for future careers.

 “The LLM in International Justice is an excellent programme for anyone with an interest in the areas of justice and human

rights. The modules are engaging and extremely interesting, and are delivered in small classroom settings by lecturers who are genuinely interested in their students. Although the LLM has a strong legal component, is it extremely accessible to non-law graduates, of which I am one. I would highly recommend the programme, and indeed Maynooth

University, to anyone with an interest in this area of study.”

Jean Molloy, LLM (International Justice)

 

Commences

September

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total: 35 credits of coursework in Year 1, 30 credits of coursework in Year 2 and a 25 credit dissertation.

Professional Development and Public International law are compulsory modules. Outside od these compulsory elements, students may choose any combinational of modules they wish.

Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.

Course duration: 2 years Part-time

More detail in Course Finder...

Duration: 2 years Part-time



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Overview. Read more

Overview

The LLM (International Justice) provides students with critical insights into the international legal system and how it operates to promote and secure justice. It analyses how the international legal order works and how it seeks to address social inequalities and protect vulnerable, marginalised and oppressed groups. The programme draws on law and other disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and political science, to provide students with a comprehensive examination of the challenges facing international justice mechanisms today.

Work placement opportunities are available as part the programme with partner civil society organisations including the Irish Council for Civil Liberties, Transparency International, the Irish Penal Reform Trust, Trócaire and Oxfam.

Teaching is delivered by means of small class lectures, in-class simulations and workshops. Students will also benefit from guest lectures delivered by international speakers.The programme is very attractive to law graduates who wish to specialise in the fields of international law and human rights, and to non-law graduates who are interested in questions of social justice and in acquiring legal tools and skills for future career options.

The LLM in International Justice is an excellent programme for anyone with an interest in the areas of justice and human

rights. The modules are engaging and extremely interesting, and are delivered in small classroom settings by lecturers

who are genuinely interested in their students. Although the LLM has a strong legal component, is it extremely

accessible to non-law graduates, of which I am one. I would highly recommend the programme, and indeed Maynooth

University, to anyone with an interest in this area of study.''

 Jean Molloy, LLM (International Justice)

Commences

September

Course Structure

Students must complete 90 credits in total, completing 35 taught credits in semester 1 and 30 credits in semester 2. A 25 credit dissertation is completed during the summer. professional Development and Public International Law are compulsory modules. Outside of these compulsory elements, students may choose any combination of modules they wish.

Not all modules offered will run every year; offerings are dependent upon demand and other potential constraints.

Course Duration: 1 year Full-time

More details in Course Finder...

Duration: 1 year Full-time



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International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. Read more
International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. The course combines perspectives from international relations, ethics and conflict resolution to reflect critically upon the wide range of social, political and economic issues associated with peace and political violence. A week-long Mediation Summer School provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in the area of conflict resolution and mediation. There is also the option to participate in various field trips in Ireland and abroad. Students are required to take the two core modules as well as four modules from the list of modules. A sufficient number of optional modules must be taken to fulfil credit requirements. A. Core Modules The Politics of Peace and Conflict Research Methods B. Students must take four modules from the following list of options: International Politics Ethics in International Affairs Conflict Resolution and Nonviolence Armed Conflict, Peace-building and Development The United Nations and Peacekeeping Human Rights in Theory and Practice Gender, War and Peace Northern Ireland: Conflict, Religion and the Politics of Peace The Politics of the Idea of Europe Race and Ethnicity, Theoretical Concepts Ethnic Conflict, Peace and the State NGOs in Theory and Practice: Internship Module Some changes to the structure and content of this course may be made during 2012-13. Prospective candidates should contact the Executive Officer for information on new developments. Teaching takes place in Dublin over two terms. A one term, non-degree course is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study. There is also the option of attending single modules. Modules from the M.Phil. in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies and the M.Phil. in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation are open to students on the M.Phil. in International Peace Studies. Students seeking to be assessed for their work on a module in either of the two other courses must first secure the permission of the relevant course coordinators. Dissertation: A research dissertation (15,000 – 20,000 words) to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff and to be submitted by 16 August.

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The Master in Development Practice (MDP) is a world leading and uniquely innovative programme that blends science and social science to further international development. Read more

The Master in Development Practice (MDP) is a world leading and uniquely innovative programme that blends science and social science to further international development. It is part of a global network with a Secretariat at the Earth Institute, Columbia University in New York (and was the only programme to receive seed funding in Europe in the first round). In the programme, students are exposed to leading edge scientific and social science techniques and researchers in order to develop international development solutions. The MDP is part of the only global educational network of its kind, involving 30 universities across all continents. In it, students receive leading edge transdisciplinary training in four “pillars”- health, natural, social, management sciences and mdpglobal.org.

The MDP is led by the Trinity College Dublin (TCD) School of Natural Science in collaboration with leading scientific researchers, and national and international organisations with specialist skills. The goal is to produce rounded development practitioners with a deep understanding of scientific methods and techniques to reduce global poverty, in addition to extensive on-the-ground training in developing country contexts, and in international organizations.

The MDP has innovative elements that distinguish it from any other M.Sc. in Ireland. This innovative course utilises a modular structure to develop student capabilities to understand theories, practices, and languages of different specialities. Students develop deep analytical and practical skills across four core pillars of the programme.

Specialist skills are formed across a range of areas including research design, methodology, and methods (with training in cutting edge scientific quantitative, qualitative, and digital tools and techniques, sustainable agriculture and hand use; Development economics; Health; Gender; Climate change and Climate justice; Science, technology and sustainable development; Impact measurement; Post-conflict situations; Governance and politics; Globalisation and African development; smart cities and sustainable urbanism. Students also produce a dissertation drawing upon research conducted during fieldwork modules. These have attracted attention from policy-makers, such as the Minister of Education in Rwanda.

It combines a range of teaching and learning approaches both in the seminar room and in the field. Students engage in a minimum of sixteen class-room based modules and three work-based placements to gain hands-on practical experience during the programme. In year one, students undertake two placements. Firstly, students complete a research project with an Irish Based International Development Non-Governmental Organisation. Secondly, they spend up to three months completing cross-disciplinary fieldwork in a developing location. To date, students have undertaken fieldwork in Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Brazil., Malawi, India, USA, Vietnam and Madagascar.

In year two students undertake internships in leading international organisations. To date, students have taken placements with UN Women, WHO, FAO, OECD, World Bank, UNESCAP, and a multitude of other international organisations.

Students have the opportunity to collaborate in a global community through their participation in the Global Classroom, a web-based capability, managed by the Earth Institute, to bring students and teachers from across world together to engage in collective classes and educational innovation.

Students engage with leading experts, practitioners, and academics both in the classroom and in the field. The MDP is delivered by TCD in collaboration with a number of key partners, including The Mary Robinson Climate Justice Foundation, and a wide number of national and international organisations with specialist skills in development practice.

You can find further information on fees, visas and scholarship information here: http://naturalscience.tcd.ie/postgraduate/dev-pract/further-info.php



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A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. Read more
A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. The second term includes a residential Spring School in Dublin. For the remainder of the programme, including the summer dissertation period, April-September students may be based in either Belfast or Dublin depending on their research interests. A one term (twelve week) programme is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study.
Course Description:
This innovative cross-border programme allows M.Phil. students to take a broader joint course Master in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, or a specialist option for either a Master in Conflict Resolution or a Master in Reconciliation Studies. The Conflict Resolution specialism develops skills in conflict analysis and conflict intervention for both established practitioners and those seeking to develop new expertise in conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation. The Reconciliation specialism offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of political conflict, drawing on social research, politics, theology and ethics. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts, and the role of religion in such conflicts and in peacebuilding and reconciliation. Case studies typically include: Northern Ireland; South Africa; Zimbabwe; Rwanda; El Salvador; Guatemala; Israel/Palestine; and Sri Lanka. The programme equips graduates for work with local and international organisations, and provides transferable skills for a wide variety of careers, including mediation, diplomacy, policy, advocacy, journalism, teaching and Ph.D. research.

Students are required to take a 10 ECTS core module in Research Skills, a further 50 ECTS of taught modules, and a 30 ECTS research dissertation. In the Conflict Resolution specialism, students are required to take the core module, Conflict Analysis and Models of Intervention. In the Reconciliation specialism, students are required to take the core module, Dynamics of Reconciliation. Optional modules worth 10 ECTS include: Conflict Resolution Skills, Conflict Transformation, Conflict Resolution Lessons from Comparative Peace Processes, Social Research for Transformation, Reconciliation in Northern Ireland, Theology of Reconciliation, Community Learning and Reflective Practice in Northern Ireland, and Post-Conflict Justice and Truth Commissions. Optional modules worth 5 ECTS include: Guided Research Project and South Africa: The Ethics of Truth and Reconciliation. Modules are generally assessed on written work of 3,000-5,000 words, to be submitted according to the internal deadlines distributed at the beginning of each academic year, with final submission date by 1 May. Subject to satisfactory performance in the written work, students may proceed to the submission of the dissertation. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment. The 30 ECTS dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words, and to be submitted by 1 August. The dissertation is required for all M.Phil. students.

Further details on the specialist tracks are available on the School website http://www.tcd.ie/ise/resolution/

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Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments. The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. Read more

Overview

Societies such as Ireland are adjusting very rapidly to change in the external and internal environments.

The aim of this MA is to interrogate the social, political, economic and cultural dimensions of the internet in contemporary societies. From work to leisure, from education to politics, the internet provides a platform for new forms of interaction, engagement and socialisation. This exciting new MA will build upon the theoretical and methodological strengths of the Department of Sociology, with additional options offered by the Departments of Law and Media in Maynooth.

Course Structure

The taught programme is built around three components: a core theoretical module, substantive courses, and methods courses. Modules include the political economy and cultures of the internet, information technology and privacy law and advanced digital research methods. Beyond this, the researching and writing of a thesis constitutes 30 credits. Each module comprises on average 12 two hour seminars.

Career Options

The aim of the MA in Sociology (Internet and Society) programme is to prepare students for both academic and non-academic positions which support social behaviour online, including on social media and in large transnational online communities. Graduates of this course will be able to interface with programmers and designers and with those working on the deep statistical analysis of user data. There is a demand for digitally literate graduates who understand the social, cultural, political, legal and business aspects of transnational online users and communities. Graduates will be able to develop, execute and report on internet based research projects for a range of public and private sector employers. They may also wish to use their new skills to progress to PhD studies.

How to Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHY56 MA Sociology (Internet and Society)

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:
Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide a copy of their birth certificate or valid passport, two academic references and official transcripts. A personal statement is required. This should include any information that you consider relevant to your interest and ability in the MA in Sociology.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. Read more
This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. The programme grows out of and addresses the needs and experiences of people in Northern Ireland. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts and the role of religion in such conflicts. It is designed to address the challenge of developing a fuller, more complex and more systematic understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to reconciliation. Thirty years of violence have taught people some costly wisdom about reconciliation, which needs both to be consolidated and further applied in Northern Ireland and to be offered to others who have experienced similar conflicts. Reciprocally, the Reconciliation Studies programme will also be probing conflicts around the world for lessons to be applied in Northern Ireland and more widely. The programme also includes a one-week Spring School in Dublin.

Students take at least five of the eight courses offered and are assessed on four of them. The courses include Dynamics of Reconciliation; Theology of Reconciliation; Conflict Transformation; Northern Ireland – Conflict and Reconciliation; Social Research Methods; Resources of Reconciliation in World Religions; When the Fighting Stops: Transitional Justice and Truth Commissions; and Conflict and Collective Identity: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Religion. Students also participate in a one-week Spring School in Dublin, which varies in content from year to year. In addition seminars will be organised in support of the programme.

Assessment: The assessment consists of four 5,000-6,000 word essays: students submit an essay on the first course ‘Dynamics of Reconciliation’, at least one from courses 2, 3 or 4, and two others – to be completed by 1st May, and an 18,000-20,000 word dissertation to be completed by 15th September.

All students are registered on a common Masters programme and follow the same assessment procedures for the four essays required. Subject to satisfactory performance in the four essays, students may proceed to submission of a dissertation for the M.Phil. degree. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment.

Admission Requirement:
Applicants should normally have an honors degree at second-class level or above. Students not meeting these criteria may exceptionally be considered at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

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