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Computer Science×

Masters Degrees in Human-Computer Interaction

We have 47 Masters Degrees in Human-Computer Interaction

Masters degrees in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) equip postgraduates with the skills to design and optimise the interactions between computer systems and their human users.

Taught MSc courses are typical for this field, though research-centred MRes and MPhil programmes are also available at some institutions. Entry requirements normally include an undergraduate degree in a suitable subject, such as Computer Science.

Why study a Masters in Human-Computer Interaction?

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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30 credit core modules, four 15 credit optional modules and a 60 credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30 credit core modules and four 15 credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30 credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules
-Interaction Science
-Interaction Design

Optional modules
-Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
-Affective Interaction
-Future Interfaces
-Human Factors for Digital Health
-Persuasive Games
-Physical Computing and Prototyping
-Socio-technical Systems

Dissertation/report
The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning
Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability
This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly indsutry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computing and Future Interaction Technologies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Research Masters in Future Interaction Technologies and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) teaches graduate students to go beyond simply building new software and hardware, to evaluating how they would be used, and how they can be improved.

The MRes is taught by the Future Interaction Technology (FIT) Lab, within the Computer Science. The FIT Lab’s mission is to explore and apply Advanced Computer Science to make interaction technologies dependable, enjoyable and effective. Interaction technologies include mobile devices, the Web, Web 2.0, implants, home TVs, microwave cookers, ticket machines, navigational aids, etc. Furthermore, we aim to work on grand challenges, like improving safety in healthcare, or developing technology to reach the millions and help us live more effective and sustainable lives.

Our Research Masters programme in Future Interaction Technologies mainly concludes of a large individual research project worth 120 credits. Inclusive of this 120 credits is training and experience provided by our Lab & Field Research Methods module. You will spend around 8 months preparing for and working on this extensive project, which provides key experience in performing research-oriented projects. As the MRes has a research focus, you will spend more independent research time building a strong knowledge of research literature and striving to make a novel contribution to the HCI community.

Taught Component

In addition to the research project, you can choose from a range of modules that provide skills and development training in different areas during your studies on the Computing and Future Interaction Technologies MRes.

Modules available currently include:

Human Computer Interaction Project

Development (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Lab & Field Work (compulsory)

Interaction Technologies: Seminars & Readings (compulsory)

Research Methodology (compulsory)

Mobile Interaction Design

Interactive Systems Design

Interaction Technologies: Information Retrieval

Interaction Technologies: Hardware & Devices

The MRes in Computing & Future Interaction Technologies is ideally suited for continued academic research, but also provides the necessary skills and key experience to apply research methods in HCI practitioner positions in industry.



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This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career. Read more
This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career.

Who is it for?

This course is for people who share our ethos of wanting to design technology that meets user needs - interactive systems that are useful, easy-to-use and engaging. It is for people who get frustrated when they interact with unnecessarily complicated Websites, mobile apps or other interactive systems and think 'I want to be able to improve this.' It is for people that want to design technology based on an understanding of users' needs and to ensure that the products they and others design meet those needs. We welcome students who share this user-centred ethos.

Objectives

This course will equip you with the latest academic research, theories and techniques in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), User Experience (UX), usability and Interaction Design and encourages you to think about design in new ways - recognising that there are many 'right' ways to design interactive systems.

You will gain a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge, along with the necessary skills and experience to create engaging user experiences. You will study modules that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process; from understanding user needs, to designing interactive systems that meet those needs, to evaluating the usability of those (and existing systems) through user research.

Placements

You will have the option to undertake a six month UX internship, after the taught part of the course has finished.

All internships are paid and provide valuable work experience, enhancing employability. As an internship student you can apply the HCI/UX knowledge and skills you have developed on the course in real-world projects and build a UX work portfolio. This supports you in standing out in the job market. You will also get the opportunity to conduct your independent research project on a topic of interest to both you and the internship company. This helps ensure the practical importance of the research.

Previous internships include positions at:
-London UX agencies (e.g Webcredible, Foolproof, Bunnyfoot)
-The BBC
-The Telegraph
-Nature.com

Academic facilities

You will benefit from the use of the City Interaction Lab - a combined commercial and research lab, where we have undertaken UX consultancy for prestigious companies including Virgin Atlantic. The lab is fitted with the latest technologies including a usability testing suite, mobile testing station, eye-tracker, interactive tabletop, brain interaction technology, 3D printer and more. We employ student consultants on some projects, providing the opportunity to work on real client projects.

Teaching and learning

The course is delivered by distinguished academics from City University London's Centre for HCI Design, who all have a passion for user-centred design. Industry professionals also participate in teaching and learning - by giving guest lectures, running practitioner tutorials and even by providing feedback on students' design outputs and input into module content, ensuring that students learn the knowledge and skills most valued by industry.

Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. It is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Examinations (which focus on applying HCI theory in realistic situations).
-Coursework (which range from written reports and essays, to posters, presentations and design documentation - e.g. wireframe prototypes). A range of both group and individual courseworks are set during the course. Group courseworks are often centred around realistic design projects.
-Independent research project (dissertation). The independent project allows students to conduct original research on an HCI topic of their choice.
-Each of these account for around one-third of the total course assessment. However, the exact balance varies according to the chosen elective module.

Modules

You will study seven core modules and one elective module that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process. Modules are delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. These include sessions delivered by guest lecturers from industry. Full-time students spend eight hours/week in lectures and four hours/week in seminars/tutorials. Part-time students spend half this time in classes. Overall workload is around 36 hours/week for full-time and 18 hours/week for part-time students.

You will also undertake an independent Research Project, for which our module on Research Methods and Professional Issues will prepare you.

A series of optional, but recommended, practitioner tutorials supplement the taught modules. These include talks, workshops and field trips. Previous tutorials have featured HCI/UX practitioners from prestigious companies including Foolproof, Futureheads and eBay.

Taught Core Modules
-Interaction design (15 credits)
-Creativity in design (15 credits)
-Information architecture (15 credits)
.-Evaluating interactive systems (15 credits)
-Inclusive design (15 credits)
-Cognition and technologies (15 credits)
-Research, methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Taught Elective modules
-Web applications development (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Telemedicine (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course empowers students to succeed in a variety of User Experience (UX) roles in leading digital agencies, business consultancies, IT companies and commercial/government organisations.

Roles include:
-UX Designer/Consultant
-User Researcher
-Information Architect
-Accessibility Specialist.

There is an increasing need for specialists with a deep knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction design. As the industry continues to expand, there is no better time to become a Master in this field. The course is also an excellent starting point for those wanting to pursue a PhD in HCI.

Our course is highly respected by industry, with exceptional employability; Over 90% of students are employed within six months of graduating (City Graduate Destinations), in prestigious companies including Samsung, Tesco, Thomson Reuters and Google.

The median annual salary for our recent graduates is £34,000 per year (City Graduate Destinations).

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Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. Read more
Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. This course is ideal if you have existing programming skills and want to understand software users and work with them to create positive user experiences. The MRes Interaction Design course will help you stand out from other graduates by providing you with the skills and theoretical understanding needed to create successful products in industry or go on to further postgraduate study in a Interaction Design/User Experience/HCI related research field. There is a vibrant international research community developing new methods and theories that underpin this discipline within the broad field of HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) and more specific Interaction Design (IxD ) and User Experience (UxD) areas.

INDUSTRY LINKS

As part of the course you will have opportunities to work with external partners. At UCLan we work with a range on businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We aim to provide a challenging and stimulating environment in which you can develop and learn new skills. As an MRes student you will be supported in exploring your full potential through taught modules and an extended project. Teaching is done in small groups with plenty of opportunities for practical work, networking with students and staff, and to get involved with research activities.

Assessment methods will include individual and group assignments, presentation and seminars.

FACILITIES

The course is delivered in the Computing and Technology Building at the City Campus in Preston at which students have access to the latest technology, and can study in a supportive environment. Facilities include a purpose built Human-Computer Interaction Suite which is used for the evaluation of software products.

OPPORTUNITIES

The goal of the course is to guide you, depending on your interests, to either go out into Industry or to progress to an academic research career. We aim to produce Interaction Design practitioners who understand how to create excellent interaction designs for a range of different scenarios.

Placement opportunities are available as an option for students who want to gain some work experience as part of the course.

We also aim to give you a thorough grounding in the Interaction Design research area so you are ready to start a PhD. After completing the MRes there will be opportunities for students to continue to MPhil or PhD study.

Our alumni have gone on to work a range of destinations including UX specialists, the BBC, and Tata.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Interaction Design is a branch of Computing concerned with how users interact with computer systems. This includes the roles of users in analysis, design and evaluation of systems, as well as methods for the system developer to create usable and useful interactive products for people, and extends to consideration of social aspects of computer use. In fact it is often more helpful to regard the computer program and its users as each being a component of a system. Many systems fail because of problems with the user interaction, rather than problems with the underlying code. This is because the human is the most complex component of the system, and the least well understood.

This course is suitable for:
-Those who wish to enter a career in Interaction Design or User Experience Design
-Those who wish to enhance their appeal to employers and stand out from other computing graduates.
-Those who wish to go on to study at PhD level
-Those in employment who wish to use the MRes project to develop a product for their employer and develop personally

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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The degree is taught by one of the UK’s most successful HCI groups with an unrivalled multi-disciplinary background in research, practice and graduate education. Read more
The degree is taught by one of the UK’s most successful HCI groups with an unrivalled multi-disciplinary background in research, practice and graduate education.

Computational devices are everywhere: at work, at home and in transit; on our desks, on our laps, in our hands. The challenges of sustainable healthcare, transport, resource delivery and emergency management all depend on development of interactive computing technologies: technologies that will only succeed if they are matched to human, social and economic needs.

Why study Computer Science with us?

- The majority of our Masters graduates move directly into computer science careers in software development or consultancy.
- We have a fully-supported professional placement programme.

What will I learn?

In this postgraduate course you will learn how to design, build and evaluate interactive systems that are fit for people; you will learn to appreciate the multi-disciplinary nature of HCI in which new understandings of human psychology, communication and social relations underpin design innovation.

As well as gaining exposure to the latest ideas in this area and developing the confidence that you can manage yourself -- and others -- in the execution of a large and complex project, you will be able to build a career path that leads equally well into industry and/or into academia.

Visit the Department of Computer Science (http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/) for further information on the department.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/msc-human-computer-interaction/

Career opportunities

Employment opportunities are extensive, and our Masters graduates have moved into computing careers in the leading computer companies, major international banks, communication companies, government agencies and educational establishments.

These companies include:

- Web Usability Partnership
- Imagination Technologies
- Nomura
- Goldman Sachs
- OC Robotics
- Nokia
- PayPal
- PriceWaterhouseCooper

About the department

The new Department of Computer Science began life in August 2001, emerging from the Computing Group of the Department of Mathematical Sciences. It is a research-led department with a strong record in interdisciplinary research and postgraduate teaching.

MSc
Our Masters programmes are designed to give you a wide range of knowledge so that you can build a career in the fast-moving industry of computing. The programmes are taught by recognised experts in each field, offering you, the student, a cutting-edge experience and a qualification which is both academic and commercially relevant. You will be exposed to the latest science and technology in your chosen specialist area, to complement previously-gained knowledge and skills from your undergraduate degree.

MPhil/PhD
The Department supports a strategic range of computer science research at PhD level and beyond. Our main research interests include Human Computer Interaction, Visual Computing, Mathematical Foundations, and Intelligent Systems. Research is pursued both in fundamental theoretical development and a range of application areas.

EngD in Digital Media
The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) in Digital Media is an alternative to the traditional PhD for students who want a career in industry. A four-year programme combines PhD-level research projects with taught courses, and students spend about 75% of their time working directly with a company.

Facilities and equipment
LAN and WAN, state-of-the-art HCI laboratory, audio laboratory.

International and industrial links
The Department has active collaborations with academics in leading universities in Europe, Australasia, the USA and Japan. Strong links with industry, e.g. HP labs, Airbus, Qinetiq, Westland, Toshiba and Vodafone.

Careers information
High employment records for undergraduate and postgraduate students. Good links with employers

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/comp-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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How can we model human task performance? How do our brains combine visual and auditory information? What is the ideal interface for a tired air traffic controller?. Read more
How can we model human task performance? How do our brains combine visual and auditory information? What is the ideal interface for a tired air traffic controller?

The Master's degree programme in Human-Machine Communication (HMC) focuses on Cognitive Science and its applications. By knowing more about cognition you can for example improve the communication between humans and complex computer systems, use language and speech technology or develop simulation models of users. HMC provides you with insights into human cognition and teaches you to use this knowledge in applied settings, such as tutoring systems, speech technology and human-computer interaction.

Two questions form the basis for this programme:
* How does human cognition work?
* How can we use this knowledge in applied settings?

To answer these questions, you have to know how humans perform specific tasks and how this performance limits and affect task performance. How do humans acquire new skills and how do they learn to adapt to a new task? It is important to know in which way information is transferred; the most natural way of human communication is language. But what about machines? Maybe keyboards, choice menus or multi-touch are more suitable.

This programme is unique in combining:
*Artificial Intelligence
*Cognitive Psychology
*Language & Speech Technology

Why in Groningen?

This programme is unique in its combination of:
- Artificial intelligence
- Cognitive psychology
- Language & speech technology

Job perspectives

Once you have obtained your Master's degree, you can then use your skills in industrial research & development departments or usability labs, where you make sure that knowledge about human thinking and acting is used as early as possible in the design process.

In companies where computer software and new media applications are made, user interface design experts, usability testers and interaction designers are needed. If you have specialized in the field of speech and language technology, you can for instance get a job at a telecommunication company.

You could also choose to get a job at a research institute where you work as a researcher. This can be done at a university (PhD studentship) or at a research institute like TNO. About 50% of our students choose a career as a scientist, mostly as PhD student.

Job examples

- Work for a telecommunication company
- Interaction designer
- Usability tester
- PhD research position

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This. MSc Computer Games Systems. course develops the high-level skills required to create new computer games for the leisure and education industries. Read more

This MSc Computer Games Systems course develops the high-level skills required to create new computer games for the leisure and education industries. It gives students the chance to learn a variety of software engineering techniques for games, ranging from low-level programming languages for fast games to high-level and computer network environments for distributed games.

Coupled with the strength of our teaching and facilities, is the direct relevance of the course content. You will have the chance to learn a range of software engineering techniques for games, ranging from low-level programming languages for fast games to high-level and computer network environments for distributed games. This will enable you to build and develop your specialist knowledge in the area(s) of gaming that excite your interest.

The taught part of the course will give you the high quality academic knowledge in games prototyping, artificial intelligence and 3D algorithms that is now in demand within the global games industry.

Modules:

  • 3D games algorithms
  • Advanced software engineering
  • Applied artificial intelligence
  • Computer games development
  • Major project
  • Research methods
  • Mobile interactive systems

COME VISIT US ON OUR NEXT OPEN DAY!

Visit us on campus throughout the year, find and register for our next open event on http://www.ntu.ac.uk/pgevents.



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Your programme of study. If you are from a computing background or you have a degree and a lot of skills within computing already this programme is a great way to quickly advance your skills in a highly employable range of careers that show no signs of stopping. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are from a computing background or you have a degree and a lot of skills within computing already this programme is a great way to quickly advance your skills in a highly employable range of careers that show no signs of stopping. You learn all the most employable skills such as programming and web development, scripting and database design for the internet, IOT and cloud based software production, user centred design and agile practices and software engineering. All businesses are rapidly evolving to ensure that the latest thinking in website design and company databases fit together as much as possible. You could be building a great ecommerce site one day and problem solving user experience the next day with the scope of this degree.

Information Technology gives you a great range of skills if you are a natural problem solver, designer and you like a challenge. It offers you technical skills in various languages and it allows you to understand the human side at the receiving end of that technical work to give you a toolkit of experience which will make you highly sought after.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Systems Analysis and Design

Web Application and Development

Information and Security

Database Systems and Big Data

Semester 2

Human Computer Interaction

Advanced Web Application Development

Enterprise Computing and Business

Semester 3

Project in IT

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/133/information-technology/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • This programme gives you sufficient skills and knowledge to decide which areas you want to work in after graduating
  • You learn skills which are in high demand and high growth internationally so you can work overseas
  • You can align your IT skills to a particular vocational area you have already studied or you are interested in
  • IT can be very well paid when you acquire expertise

Where you study

  • Online
  • 12 Months
  • Full Time
  • September or January start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

You may also be interested in:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/1085/information-technology/



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This broad-ranging course concentrates on the latest tools, techniques and practices of information systems management. Read more

About the course

This broad-ranging course concentrates on the latest tools, techniques and practices of information systems management. Covering object-orientated programming, computer systems and networking, advanced database design, web systems, technology change management and integration, an much more, the course exposes you to the most recent developments in both the theory and the practice of modern information systems.

The Computing MSc, Information Systems Management MSc, Information Systems Management MSc and Information Technology MSc are very closely linked with a common first semester, giving you the option of changing between these courses before the Christmas vacation.

Course Structure

Modules

First semester (October - January)

• Object-Orientated Programming
• Database Systems and Design
• Computer Systems and Networks
• Systems Analysis and Design

Second semester (February to May)

• Research Methods, Professionalism and Ethics
• Management of Information Systems
• E-Commerce Systems
• Human Factors in Systems Design

Third Semester (June to September)

During your final semester you will work on your project/ dissertation, chosen by you and agreed by your project supervisor. Part-time students normally choose to work on their project over an entire academic year.

Optional placement
We offer a great opportunity to boost your career prospects through an optional one year placement as part of your postgraduate studies. We have a dedicated Placement Unit which will help you obtain this. Once on your placement you will be supported by your Visiting Tutor to ensure that you gain maximum benefit from the experience. Placements begin after the taught component of the course has been completed - usually around June - and last for one year. When you return from your work placement you will begin your project.

Teaching and assessment

The course can be studied either full-time over one year or part-time for two–six years, beginning in September each year (a January start date may also be available).

There will be two- or three-week vacations at Christmas and New Year (December/January) and Easter (March/April), and some students also take a brief break in June or July before completing their dissertation.

Teaching will include formal lectures, tutorials and laboratories. You will also be expected to undertake independent study and research to support your assignments and dissertation. Assessment will be by various group and individual methods including exams, projects, presentations, written essays and reports.

You will normally be expected to attend a two-week induction in September, to prepare you for modules taught in semester one.

Contact and learning hours

Full-time students will normally attend around 12 hours of timetabled taught sessions per week, and can expect to undertake around 24 further hours of self-directed independent study and research to support your assignments and dissertation

Academic expertise

The Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility is internationally recognised for its applied research expertise. In a world where individuals, businesses and governments increasingly depend on information and communication technologies, this acclaimed research centre is looked to for authoritative advice on their social, organisational and ethical impacts. Our experts collaborate with a range of worldwide partners assessing implications and shaping codes of practice.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

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This exciting. MRes Computer Science. course is designed to give you the opportunity to develop research skills in a computing area that meets your interests and career development needs. Read more

This exciting MRes Computer Science course is designed to give you the opportunity to develop research skills in a computing area that meets your interests and career development needs. It allows you to combine material from any of our taught Masters courses in the computing suite with an extended research project over a one-year period.

Current demands are greater than ever for individuals to attain postgraduate levels of qualification in an increasingly competitive jobs market. As a result, the MRes Computer Science has been designed to meet the needs of students and employers, providing superior qualified graduates to national and international employers.

The MRes is divided into a taught element (60 credit points) and a laboratory-based research project (120 credit points).

This MSc Computer Science course offers the chance to study a range of topics in the computer science area, including principles of system design, software engineering, enterprise computing, computing architecture and applications of artificial intelligence. You will also have the opportunity to undertake an individual project, based on subjects that interest you, as well as research at the University or your industrial experience if you do a placement.

Demand for high-level software engineering skills continues to rise. Employers are finding it increasingly hard to recruit suitably qualified programmers and software technologists and so, with its emphasis on the application of the latest research ideas, the course will give you the skills to enjoy a highly rewarding career in the cutting-edge computing industry.

The MSc is divided into 60 credit point taught modules and the research project is worth 60 credit points.

Modules

  • Major Project
  • Research Methods
  • Advanced Software Engineering
  • Systems Analysis and Design
  • Service-oriented Cloud Technologies
  • Applied Artificial Intelligence
  • Mobile Interactive Systems
  • Internet Programming
  • 3D Games Algorithms
  • Computer Forensics
  • Robotics and Cybernetics
  • Computer Security
  • Embedded Systems
  • Mobile Networks
  • Network and Cloud Security
  • Wireless Communications

COME VISIT US ON OUR NEXT OPEN DAY!

Visit us on campus throughout the year, find and register for our next open event on http://www.ntu.ac.uk/pgevents.



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This course is intended for postgraduate students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It will equip you with the necessary theory, practical knowledge and skills required to design, evaluate and implement interactive computing systems. Read more
This course is intended for postgraduate students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It will equip you with the necessary theory, practical knowledge and skills required to design, evaluate and implement interactive computing systems.

As computing applications become ever more pervasive, it is widely recognised by industry that the success or failure of this technology is very considerably influenced by the "human factor".

It is increasingly considered essential that end users - as well as wider stakeholders - are accounted for in the design process. In recent years, attempts to understand the complexities of user-system interactions associated with modern computer systems have led to the emergence of the discipline of interactive systems design.

The course is intended for students from a wide range of backgrounds, including those with first degrees in Computer Science, or many other areas such as Pure/Social Science (e.g. Psychology) or Engineering. If you are interested in designing interactive systems, then this course is aimed at you.

It will also appeal to prospective or current software engineers who wish to build upon their previously acquired skills and knowledge, as well as those of you who are looking for a strong basis for PhD research.

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The discipline of Human Computer Interaction is about many things. It is about the interface that a system provides (and, therefore, is the most important and most complex component of most systems) but it is also about so much more. Read more
The discipline of Human Computer Interaction is about many things: It is about the interface that a system provides (and, therefore, is the most important and most complex component of most systems) but it is also about so much more. We need to understand the people that use the systems and their abilities and constraints. We need to understand how to build systems that really work and also how to evaluate them. We also need to be able to think creatively in order to build innovative solutions to new problems and emerging applications and domains - to be able to solve the problems of tomorrow’s world rather than just those of today.

This course covers the underpinning theories, methodologies and practices of HCI. It includes specialist modules in application domains. Through course and project work your degree is intimately integrated into the research of the University’s HCI centre.

Breakdown of course

This is a one year, full-time course. In the first 8 months, students will spend half of their time studying taught modules. Here we will cover the core principles, theories, methodologies and application areas of the discipline. There will also be an opportunity to take optional modules in areas such as Computer Security, Robotics or Nature Inspired Computation.

The other half of your time will be spent on two mini-projects. Here you will work one-to-one with one of our research-active staff to explore an area in great depth – analyzing the problem and existing solutions, developing new ideas and building or evaluating prototype systems. Here you will develop your skills in analysis, research, technology and also in presenting and explaining your work clearly and effectively.

The final four months will be spent extending the work of one of your mini-projects, again with expert one-to-one supervision.

About the School of Computer Science

The School of Computer Science at University of Birmingham has consistently been ranked in the Top 10 in UK league tables and has regularly achieved high satisfaction scores in National Student Surveys. 95% of our students go into graduate employment (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2014/15), and our School is ranked 8th nationally for research quality in the '2014 Research Excellence Framework'.
Our work is regularly presented in international conferences and journals, indicating the high standards we achieve in research. In 2008, the UK Funding Councils undertook a national assessment of the quality of research at British universities, the RAE. Among 81 submissions nationally for computer science, the School is equal 7th in the proportion of 4* awards, for research quality that is world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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